PhiC31

Chemical and Light Inducible Recombinases

In a recent Nature Communications publication Weinberg et al., (2019) report developing and testing a repertoire of inducible site-specific recombinases capable of being activated by different inducers such as small molecules, light, and temperature.   While developed and tested in mammalian cells and transgenic mice, they will be widely useful in insect systems.

Parallel Cloning by Site Specific Recombination

Blanco-Redondo and Langenhan (2018) report recently in G3 valuable improvements in the  φC31 system that enable the simultaneous targeted integration of two transgenes into distinct landing sites using a single source of  φC31 recombinase. The development of modern genetic engineering […]

Short Course on Insect Genetic Technologies – August 2015

The Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is offering a short course on insect genetic technologies August 17-21, 2015. Today there are myriad technologies for modifying genomes. Technologies are emerging rapidly and it is a challenge for investigators to keep […]

Anopheles gambiae Transgenesis Tool Box – Major Additions

Volohonsky et. al. (2015) in a just-published paper in G3 entitled  “Tools for Anopheles gambiae transgenesis”  describe a wealth of new tools for creating transgenic An. gambiae. There has been a protocol for Anopheles gambiae transgenesis for over 15 years, […]

A Stable, Replaceable, Highly Efficient Transgene Expression System

Long et. al. in Scientific Reports describe a system for creating stable sites in the genome of Bombyx mori that allow for site-specific recombination-mediated integration of transgenes. Transposons are essential platforms for many insect genetic technologies and are typically used […]

New ΦC31 Resources

A rapid method for generating and finding ΦC31 landing sites (attP) with the desired expression characteristics as well as a new method for creating transgene arrays in vivo was recently described by Knapp et al (2015). Albeit these methods were […]

The Fly Facility at the University of Cambridge Department of Genetics

The Department of Genetics at the University of Cambridge is primarily located in a large Edwardian building close to the centre of town. The department has a long and distinguished history of Drosophila research beginning with John Thoday’s evolutionary genetics […]

φC31 in Anopheles gambiae: A How-To

In terms of genetic engineering of insects, the current most commonly used technique for germline transformation involves the use of mobile transposable genetic elements, which are simply inefficient, have limited carrying capacities, and integrate randomly into genomes resulting in insertional […]