Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics, and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant, you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements, and Activities.


 

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Participant Contact Research Focus
Gulsaz Shamim
CV
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
gulsazshamim@gmail.com
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
DEEPAK KUMAR SINHA
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology
M.M. University, India
AMBALA HARYANA INDIA
deepak22sinha@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Entomologist
I developed deep interest in insect pest biology with regards to its interaction with host. My research area deals with understanding the molecular basis of insect-plant interactions. In this broad field, I am specially interested in insect pests of crops such as rice and wheat. I have worked on gall midge, aphids and want to focus more on yellow stem borers. I want to understand aspects of virulence of these pests and also investigate into the role of different gut bacteria in virulence.
Giuseppe Saccone
PhD, Assist. Professor
Department of Biology
University Federico II of Naples
Naples Italy Italy
giuseppe.saccone@unina.it
Sex Evo Devo
Evolution of sex determining genes and networks in dipteran species of economic or medical relevance. Molecular entomology and Insect Biotechnology. We have uncovered in the mediterranean fruitly Ceratitis capitata a key epigenetic gene for female sex determination, Cctra(ep), which has an additional autoregulatory function compared to the Drosophila tra orthologue, which lost it. In Ceratitis, as in Drosophila, Cctra(ep) controls the splicing of the downstream doublex and fruitless genes. We and others have found that this evolutionary version of transformer(ep) is a master gene for female sex determination widely conserved in Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera. We have developed a
Jonas Schwirz
Project Group Bioresources
Fraunhofer IME
Giessen Hessen Germany
jonas.schwirz@ime.fraunhofer.de

Drosophila genetics and transgenesis
Dr. Max Scott
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
max_scott@ncsu.edu
Scott Lab
Our main interest is in developing transgenic “male-only” strains of insect pests for genetic control programs. For example, we have developed strains of flies that are pests of livestock (e.g. New World screwworm), which carry genetic systems that cause female lethality unless tetracycline is added to the diet. We are also interested in developing genetic systems for replacing mosquito populations with strains that have a reduced capacity to transmit diseases such as dengue fever. Our applied work is underpinned by fundamental research on the regulation of gene expression in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. For example, we have investigated how
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Dr. Jeffrey Stuart
Professor, Insect Molecular Genetics
faculty
Department of Entomology
Purdue University
West Lafayette IN United States
stuartjj@purdue.edu
Stuart Lab
Dr. Stuart's research is largely focused on the molecular genetics of plant-insect interactions. Currently, it is centered on understanding the mechanisms that allow plant-galling arthropods to create galls on plants and testing the hypothesis that arthropod-produced effector proteins have evolved to create the extended phenotypes we call plant galls. Toward that goal, we have been improving the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), one of the most economically important gall midges, as a genetically tractable experimental organism for studies of plant-insect interactions and arthropod-induced plant-gall formation. Recent efforts have sequenced and assembled the HF genome and ordered approximately 60% of the
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
Alekos Simoni
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London London United Kingdom
a.simoni@imperial.ac.uk

Applying state of the art molecular biology to vector control with the aim of reducing malaria transmission
Qi Su
Ph.D
Department of Entomology
Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
suqicaas@163.com

I am interested in studying the multitrophic interactions between whiteflies, especially the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci, Begomoviruses, especially Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and bacterial endosymbionts that reside within the whiteflies. I am further interested in several aspects of ensosymbiont influence on the whitefly biology and interactions with biotic and abiotic stress.
Jackson Sparks
Postdoctoral Research Entomologist
Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Lab
ARS-USDA
Beltsville MD USA
jackson.sparks@ars.usda.gov

Our research is aimed at characterizing the molecular components of the mosquito chemosensory repertoire. Our mission is to deliver methods to identify novel repellents or repellent blends. We hope to identify all major molecular classes susceptible to repellent effects in order to screen novel compounds or mixtures. The significance of individual chemosensory genes are validated through chemosensory organ expression analyses, genetic manipulation and electrophysiological and behavioral assays.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Paul Shirk
Research Physiologist
CV
Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit
USDA-ARS CMAVE
Gainesville Florida USA
paul.shirk@ars.usda.gov
Shirk Lab
The Shirk lab is currently creating the genetic and microbiological tools necessary to genetically transform obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria particularly Wolbachia. This requires modification and application of transgenic systems utilized in transgenesis of insects. We are also collaborating with other labs to achieve somatic and germline transformation of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, the varroa mite, Varroa destructor, and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella employing piggyBac vectors.
Dayalan Srinivasan
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Rowan University
Glassboro NJ USA
srinivasan@rowan.edu

We use the pea aphid, an insect that displays several polyphenisms, as our model for understanding the genetic, epigenetic cellular basis of phenotypic plasticity as well as its evolution.
Hideki Sezutsu
Head
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
hsezutsu@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research lab
We are developing transgenic silkworms for fundamental research and applications. Our aims are to understand insect functions and evolution, in addition to design the insects for the creation of new insect-industries.
Maria Cristina Silva
PhD.
CV
Biotechniology
Embrapa Genetic Resource and Biotechnology
Brasilia DF BRAZIL
cristina.mattar@embrapa.br
Plant Pest Molecular Interaction
Specialist in plant molecular biology, works in the area of plant biotechnology aimed at resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Undertakes research focusing on the following themes: Evolution of molecules in vitro selection of variants with improved activity, molecular interaction studies aiming to plant pest resistance to insects.
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Alimorad Sarafrazi
Dr
CV
Insect Taxonomy Research Department
Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection
Tehran Tehran/Asia Iran
asarafrazi@yahoo.com
Heteroptera
I'm working on the taxoxnomy of Heteroptera based on morphological and molecular characters. I have also working on the population Genetics of these taxa. Recently I have conducted some works on phyloclimatics of Heteroptera combining the genetic structure and distribution modeling