A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
De-Fen Mou
Graduate student
Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Davie Florida USA
defenmou@ufl.edu

My research interest is primarily in the insect-pathogen-plant interactions. My doctoral research is focusing on the vector of palm infecting phytoplasma disease, Lethal Bronzing Disease. Knowing the vector is essential to develop effective disease management strategy.
Alla Madich
Mrs
Genetics
University of Cambidge
Cambridge UK United Kingdom
am2557@gen.cam.ac.uk
Fly Facility
Transgenic technique
Bahareh Mohebbi
Molecular Immunology
Molecular Immunology Research Center
Tehran Tehran Iran
baharsp943@yahoo.com

I worked on cancer, Msc, transplantation,microfluidics, CRISPR, miRNAs, fibrosis, animal modeling, conditined media and exosomes, and EMT and MET.
Pornphawit Mo-mai
Immunology
Mahidol University
Bangkok Central of Thailand Thailand
pornphawitmomai@gmail.com

CD4 T cell engineered to resist HIV infection
Lauren Mee
Department of Evolution, Ecology and Behaviour
Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
l.mee@liverpool.ac.uk

Using comparative bioinformatics to tease out the relationships between sociality, immunity and the microbiome across multiple origins of sociality in Hymenoptera (mostly bees and wasps).
Alvaro Molina-Cruz
Dr
CV
LMVR
NIAID/NIH
Rockville Maryland United States
amolina-cruz@niaid.nih.gov
Mosquito Immunity and Vector Competence
My goal is to identify the mosquito and parasite factors that determine malaria transmission and the design of new transmission blocking strategies. Through the creative use of genetics, molecular biology and functional genetics I have carried out the identification of a P. falciparum gene (Pfs47) that allows the parasite to evade the mosquito immune system. I have also obtained evidence that Pfs47 is important for the adaptation of P. falciparum to anophelines in different regions of the world. My work has provided important insights that could help to understand better the globalization of P. falciparum
Farkhanda manzoor
prof
CV
Zoology
Lahore College for Women University, Lahore
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
drfarkhanda786@gmail.com
Entomology research lab
Taxonomy, biology and integrated management (control) of urban insect pests such as termites, mosquitoes, cockroaches, ants etc. She has introduced termite baiting in Pakistan and has been working with resistance to insecticides against mosquitoes, cockroaches and flies.
Lolita Mathew
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
Pest Management and Biocontrol Research
U.S. Arid Land Agricultural Research Center : USDA ARS - Maricopa
Maricopa AZ United States
Lolita.mathew@ars.usda.gov
Jeff Fabrick Lab
I am broadly interested in understanding how insect pests evolve resistance to Bt crops. Specifically, I use tools related to molecular genetics, cell biology, and Next Gen. Sequencing analysis to compare between resistant and susceptible populations of pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton.
Megan Meuti
Assistant Professor
Entomology
The Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
meuti.1@osu.edu
Meuti Lab
I study the molecular regulation of seasonal responses in insects. I am specifically interested in knowing how temperate insects are able to measure day lengths to determine when it is summer and they should quickly grow, develop and reproduce, and when it is winter and they should avert their resources to surviving a prolonged period without food, water and combat temperature stresses. My PhD work has suggested that the Northern House Mosquito, Culex pipiens, uses its circadian clock genes to measure daylength and appropriately coordinate its seasonal responses. Now we are working to connect the clock to the hormonal regulators of
Farkhanda Manzoor
prof
CV
zoology
Lahore college for women university, Lahore
LAHORE PUNJAB Pakistan
doc_farkhanda@yahoo.com
Entomology Research Lab
She is known for her research on Taxonomy, biology and integrated management (control) of urban insect pests such as termites, mosquitoes, cockroaches, ants etc. She has introduced termite baiting in Pakistan and has been working with resistance to insecticides against mosquitoes, cockroaches and flies.
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
Maciej Maselko
Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St. Paul MN USA
mmaselko@umn.edu

I am developing Synthetic Incompatibility; an approach for engineering species-like barriers in sexually reproductive organisms. Synthetic Incompatibility has applications for transgene biocontainment in plants engineered to produce high-value compounds and for controlling pest species such as mosquitoes and invasive fish.
Atif Manzoor
Assistant Professor (IPFP, HEC)
Agricultural Biotechnology Division
National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Pujnab Pakistan
atif1903@yahoo.com

My basic research interests are the proteomic and transcriptomic studies of parasitoid venoms and isolation of bioactive genes present in the venom glands.
Johan Ariff Mohtar
Mr
CV
Department of Chemical Engineering Technology (Industrial Biotechnology)
Universiti Malaysia Perlis
Kampus UniCiti Alam, Sungai Chuchuh, Padang Besar Perlis Malaysia
joarach82@gmail.com
Tissue Culture and Biomolecular Laboratory
For the past two years, I have been engaging in the spider silk research for tissue engineering application. Spider silk gland from the basal lineage of spider species provides a promising platform as a potential bioreactor for recombinant protein production. I am pursuing a PhD study in the effort of developing transgenic social spiders for such purpose
Gajalakshmi Muthu
CV
of Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
Bangalore  karanataka India
gajalakshmiagri@gmail.com

Molecular Entomology, Insecticide Resistance, Taxonomy
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Misato Miyakawa
Dr.
Center for Bioscience Research and Education, Laboratory of Environmental Physiology
Utsunomiya University
Utsunomiya Tochigi Japan
misatorus@gmail.com

Invasive ants
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
Ines Elena Martin-Martin
Postdoc Visiting Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratoy of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/National Institutes of Health
Rockville Maryland United States
ines.martin-martin@nih.gov

My research focuses on the study of insect's salivary proteins and their relationship with blood-feeding process and transmission of vector-borne pathogens.
sharrine marra
CV
Entomology
Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso
Rondonópolis Mato Grosso Brazil
sharrine.oliveira@hotmail.com

Insecticide resistence; biotecnology; entomology
Elisabeth Marchal
Biology - research group of Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
KU Leuven
Leuven Vl-Brabant Belgium
elisabeth.marchal@bio.kuleuven.be

Regulation of lipophilic hormone biosynthesis, ecdysteroids, juvenile hormones. Signal transduction of JH, 20E, cross-talk and interaction with insulin like peptides. Neuropeptides and their GPCRs.
Mohammad Asaduzzaman Miah
PhD Scholar
CV
Insect Molecular Biology, College of Plant Protection
Nanjing Agricultural University
Nanjing Jiangsu China
2014202051@njau.edu.cn
Insect Physiology and Molecular Biology
Molecular mechanism of Insecticide resistance, Functional expression (invitro) of metabolic (detoxification) enzymes ( the genes of CYP450 families) which responsible for insecticide resistance as well as to find out the activities of metabolites (Chemicals/insecticides) in insect body.
Wendy Moore
Assistant Professor, Insect Systematics and Curator
Department of Entomology
University of Arizona
Tucson Arizona United States
wmoore@email.arizona.edu

Dr. Wendy Moore and her lab members investigate the evolution and ecology of terrestrial arthropods. Specific projects focus on arthropod systematics. We use molecular genetic techniques and morphological methods to infer robust phylogenetic frameworks to identify and describe natural groups of terrestrial arthropods, to study their diversification and patterns of distribution, and to elucidate their ecological roles and to assess the impact of key innovations on their evolutionary histories.
Conor McMeniman
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
cmcmeni1@jhu.edu

My group studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving mosquito attraction to humans, and the impact of pathogen infection on mosquito olfactory perception and behavior.
Osama Bin manzoor
Entomology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan  Hubei  China
osmamanzoor11@hotmail.com

RNAi is a important tool to combat Insect Pests
Anyi Mazo-Vargas
PhD student
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY US
am2622@cornell.edu
Laboratory of evolution of animal color patterns
I work with wing color patterns in butterflies to answer questions related to the evolution of gene regulation and developmental re-patterning. In my project I am using a mix of old school methods as: in-situ hybridization, antibody stains, drug treatments; and new genomics techniques as: ATAC-seq, RNA-seq and CRISPR-Cas9.
Richard Meisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Biochemistry
University of Houston
Houston TX United States
rpmeisel@uh.edu

Evolutionary genomics of sex chromosomes, sex determination, and sexual dimorphism in flies.
Ademir Martins
PhD
CV
Laficave
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ)
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
ademirjr@ioc.fiocruz.br
Lab of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors
Insecticide resistance mechanisms in insects of medical importance
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Angela Meccariello
Ph.D. student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Naples 'Federico II'
Naples Italy Italy
angela.meccariello@unina.it
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Genetics and transcriptomics of sex determination in pest insects: Aedes albopictus Ceratitis capitata Phlebotomus perniciosus
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Sarah Maguire
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Belle Mead NJ United States
smaguire@Princeton.edu

I am broadly interested in the biological basis of behavior – especially through neurogenetic and evolutionary perspectives. The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is an ideal model system to study the biological basis of behavior because its attraction to human hosts makes it the number one vector of yellow and Dengue fever, the latter of which affects an estimated 50 million people per year! The goal of my research is to 1) determine the molecular basis of Aedes’s attraction to humans as well as 2) map the neural circuitry underlying Aedes’s attraction and repulsion behavior.
Keshava Mysore
PhD
CV
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine - University of Notre Dame
South Bend Indiana USA
kmysore@iu.edu
Duman-Scheel Lab
I am currently studying functional and developmental neurogenetics of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.
David Majerowicz
Msc., PhD.
Faculdade de Farmacia
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
majerowicz@pharma.ufrj.br

Use of insect as models for lipid metabolsim and obesity; Role of nuclear receptors and hormones in the control of lipid metabolism; Role of nuclear receptors in the Rhodnius prolixus - Trypanossoma cruzi interaction.
John Marshall
MRC Research Fellow
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Imperial College London
London London UK
john.marshall@imperial.ac.uk

My research focuses on the use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. I have worked in a mosquito genetic engineering lab, and have developed mathematical models to describe the spread of anti-malaria genes through mosquito populations. I have also commentated on regulatory issues related to GM mosquitoes capable of spreading across international borders, and conducted the first public attitude survey on perspectives of people in Africa to GM mosquitoes for malaria control. Results from this survey suggested people would be supportive of GM mosquitoes that have been shown to work in confined field trials. This
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Kajan Muneeswaran
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
University of Colombo
Colombo Western province Sri Lanka
kajan.muneeswaran@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
Developing transgenic mosquitoes resistant to all four dengue viral serotypes in Sri Lanka by RNA interference pathway which can be activated by the blood-meal in female mosquitoes to combat against the #1 killer dengue disease which kills more than 200 annually.
Alex Mak
asdf
asdf
Baltimore Maryland USA
almak1@umbc.edu

asdf
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
John Masly
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
University of Oklahoma
Norman OK U.S.A.
masly@ou.edu

The primary goal of the research performed in my lab is to understand the mechanisms that generate biodiversity. We use molecular and genomic technologies to study how genetic change directs the development of differences between species and ultimately gives rise to two important evolutionary processes— speciation and phenotypic evolution. We study four closely related species of fruit flies that belong to the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, which allows us to take advantage of the arsenal of genetic, genomic, and molecular tools available in D. melanogaster. More recently, we have begun to develop North American damselflies in the genus Enallagma as
Mitch McVey
Associate professor
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
mitch.mcvey@tufts.edu
The McVey lab
We use Drosophila to study DNA repair and recombination. We are particularly interested in the mechanisms by which alternative end-joining and recombinational repair of double-strand breaks results in mutagenesis and genome instability.
Subbarayalu Mohankumar
Professor
Plant biotechnology
Tamil Nadu agricultural university
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
Smktnau@gmail.com
Molecular ecology
Molecular ecology of crop- pest interactions, diversity of pollinators , IPM, pest genetics and genomics
CRISTINA MANJON
Postdoctoral Researcher
Insect toxicology and Resistance
Bayer CropScience
Monheim NRW Germany
cristina.manjon@bayer.com
Insect toxicology and Resistance Lab
I am a researcher part of the Resistance Management team working closely with Ralf Nauen at Bayer CropScience. I am interested in the study of the detoxification mechanisms that operate in beneficials as well as in different pest species that develop insecticide resistance. In order to carry out this research we rely on different techniques for genetic profiling (microarrays, RNAseq, real-time PCR, etc.), as well as on gene silencing approaches such as RNA interference (RNAi technology, dsRNA).
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Mauro Mandrioli
Associate Professor in Genetics
Life Sciences
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Interdepartmental Research Centre for Agri-food Biological Resources Improvement and Valorisation (BIOGEST-SITEIA)
Modena Italy Italy
mauro.mandrioli@unimore.it
Digital Agriculture Lab
The mission of the DIGITAG Lab is to favour the adoption of digital tools and data-driven approaches in the agricultural practices. In particular, we are currently working to: i. develop new platforms for the sequencing and annotation of genomes obtained from bacteria of agricultural interest; ii. analyse and map at a chromosomal level genomes of insect of agricultural interest; iii. favour the application of block chains for food traceability to support consumers; iv: study the composition and role of microbiota in insects; v. prototype new insect traps combining 3D printing, laser cutter and engineering. The Digital Agriculture Laboratory (DIGITAG Lab) was
Nancy Moran
Professor
Integrative Biology
University of Texas at Austin
Austin TX USA
nancy.moran@austin.utexas.edu
Nancy Moran
I study biology and evolution of insects especially symbiotic relationships. Main groups of interest are aphids, leafhoppers, and bees.
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Carolyn McBride
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ USA
lmcbride@rockefeller.edu

The molecular, neural, and evolutionary basis of insect behavior
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Assistant professor
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Insect genetic manipulation and gene drive
Sanyuan Ma
State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology
Southwest University
Chongqing Chongqing P. R. China
masanyuan@hotmail.com

Genome editing, CRISPR/Cas9, TALEN, Bombyx mori, Silk gland, Bioreactor, Synthetic bilology.
Micky Mwamuye
Molecular Biology & Bioinformatics Unit/Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab
International Centre of insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Nairobi Kenya
mmwamuye@icipe.org
Postgraduate Student
My current research focus is on the biodiversity of Ticks and tick-borne zoonoses at human-livestock-wildlife interfaces.
Fiona Mumoki
PhD Student
Zoology and Entomology Department, Social Insect Research Group
University of Pretoria
Hatfield, Pretoria Gauteng South Africa
nelimafiona@yahoo.com

I am interested in chemical communication in honeybee reproductive dominance
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
cmerlin@bio.tamu.edu
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Dr. Rakesh Mishra
CV
CCMB
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad Telangana India
mishra@ccmb.res.in
Senior Principal Scientist and Group Leader
We are interested in understanding how non-coding part of the genome, including repetitive sequences, brings about cell type specific is packaging and how once this packaging established it is maintained by epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms. We use Hox gene complexes as loci in model systems, Drosophila and zebrafish, to address theses issues address evolution of complexity in animals. By analyzing the genome organization in the context of nuclear architecture we study the structural basis of cellular memory. We propose that embryonic development is setting up of functional form of genome (epigenome or cell type specific chromatin) starting from the stem cell
Jeffrey Marcus
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg MB Canada
marcus@cc.umanitoba.ca
Evolutionary developmental genetics of butterflies
My research interests focus on the evolution of developmental mechanisms. My laboratory studies the genetic and developmental basis of phenotypic variation, primarily using colour pattern formation in butterflies and moths as a model system. We employ a variety of approaches in our experiments including genomics, molecular phylogenetics, transgenics, immunohistochemistry, and computational biology.
Arnaud Martin
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California Berkley
BERKELEY CA USA
heliconiuswing@gmail.com
Evolution and Development of butterflies and moths
I am a developmental biologist who specializes in evolutionary studies of the genotype-phenotype map, in particular in non-model organisms of ecological interest. I am particularly interested in the generative mechanisms of evolutionary change and use a combination of comparative, genomic and developmental tools in lepidopterans to tackle how the genetic properties of living systems generate variation and biodiversity.
Stephanie Mohr
Director of the DRSC
Genetics
Harvard Medical School
Boston MA USA
stephanie_mohr@hms.harvard.edu
Drosophila RNAi Screening Center & Genome Engineering Production Group
At the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC) and more recently founded Genome Engineering Production Group (GEPG), we focus on the use of and new developments in RNA interference (RNAi), the CRISPR/Cas system, and other functional genomics approaches, including genome engineering. We are a community-focused group dedicated to transferring technologies, know-how and research materials to others for their research. We also have a growing suite of software tools and databases. Our resources are developed primarily for use with Drosophila melanogaster but many of the same approaches, underlying software, research materials, etc. can be used for non-model insects.
David Marcey
Fletcher Jones Professor of Developmental Biology
CV
Biology
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks California USA
marcey@clunet.edu
Marcey Lab
The compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster consists of about 800 ommatidia in a polar arrangement around the dorsoventral (D-V) midline. Each ommatidium consists of eight photoreceptor cells arranged in a trapezoidal fashion with two mirror-symmetric forms, a dorsal form above the D-V midline, and a ventral form below. When differentiation of the ommatidia begins within the epithelium of the third instar larval eye-antennal imaginal disc, each ommatidium is a bilaterally symmetrical cluster of photoreceptor precursors polarized in the anteroposterior axis. These precursors become polarized on the D-V axis by proto-ommatidium rotation. The establishment of polarity along the D-V axis requires
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
kmichel@ksu.edu
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.