Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics, and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant, you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements, and Activities.


 

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Participant Contact Research Focus
Gary Blissard
Professor
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
gwb1@cornell.edu
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
John Belote
Professor
Biology Department
Syracuse University
Syracuse NY USA
jbelote@syr.edu
Belote Lab
In collaboration with the Scott Pitnick lab (Syracuse University) we are studying mechanisms of post-mating sexual selection in a variety of insects, including Drosophila, Tribolium, sepsids and yellow dung flies.
Daniel Bopp
Dr
Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
University of Zurich
Zurich Zurich Switzerland
daniel.bopp@imls.uzh.ch
Evolution of sex determination pathways
We are studying the evolution of sex determining pathways by comparing the pathway in Drosophila melanogaster to those of the housefly Musca domestica and the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. We find that the genes at the end of the Drosophila pathway, doublesex and its direct regulators, transformer and transformer2 are highly conserved and probably part of an ancient module that controls sexual differentiation in holometabolous insects . In contrast, genes upstream at the signaling end of the cascade have largely diverged between the different insect species. We are presently analysing the structure and function of such regulatory genes
Martin Beye
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary Genetics
Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
martin.beye@hhu.de
Honeybee genetics, evolutionary genetics
We would like to understand the genetic basis of sex determination and social behaviors in honeybees. We have developed a method to generate high frequency integrations of the piggyBac Transposon in the honeybee
Robert Brucker
Rowland Junior Fellow
FAS - Rowland Institute
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
bruckerlab@gmail.com
Brucker lab
Microbe-host-envoronment interactions and evolution.
Dr. Jennifer Brisson
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY United States
jbrisso3@bio.rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
genetic mapping and association mapping using Illumina data, as well as Illumina (RNA-Seq) studies; in situ hybridization of RNA to embryos, methyl-Seq
Thierry Brévault
Dr
Entomology
CIRAD
Dakar Dakar Senegal
brevault@cirad.fr

Entomology and Ecology
Dr. Susan Brown
Distinguished Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
sjbrown@ksu.edu
Brown Lab
The Brown lab is using the Irys high-throughput genome mapping platform from BioNano Genomics to improve the Tribolium castaneum genome.
Björn Brembs
Prof. Dr.
Institute of Zoology - Neurogenetics
Universität Regensburg
Regensburg Bavaria Germany
bjoern@brembs.net

We are interested in the neurobiology of spontaneous behavioral choice and operant learning.
Jonathan Bobek
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe Arizona United States
jonathan.bobek@asu.edu
Gro Amdam Lab
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of behavior and physiology in the honeybee, Apis Mellifera. Previously I have studied artificial flower color choice of free-flying honeybee foragers, examining relative expression through microarray. I am currently examining gene candidates which may be involved in the transition from nurse to forager roles.
Hua Bai
Investigator
CV
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Brown University
Providence RI USA
hua_bai@brown.edu

Neuroendocrine regulation of insect development, reproduction, metabolism and aging
Susanta Behura
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
sbehura@nd.edu

My work focuses on insect genetics and genomics. My primary interests are on functional and evolutionary genomics of vector competence of Aedes aegypti to dengue virus infection. Other specific areas of interest are 1) Comparative genomics, 2) Transcriptomics 3) Codon bias and translational selection, 4) Mitochondria and Numt, 5) Transposable elements and repeat sequences, 6) Non-coding RNAs, 7) Genome sequencing and analysis, and genome-wide association studies.
Yehuda Ben-Shahar
Assistant Professor
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis Missouri USA
benshahary@wustl.edu
Ben-Shahar lab at Wash U
We are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity on three major time scales: evolutionary, Developmental and Physiological. We address these questions with the powerful genetic model Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), and the emerging model for complex social behaviors, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Research approaches in the lab include behavior, genetics, genomics, molecular and cellular biology, and neurophysiology.
Leigh Boardman
Dr
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Fl USA
lboardman@ufl.edu

Integrative and comparative biology, genotype-phenotype interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying organismal tolerance to environmental stressors
Laura Boykin
Dr.
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The University of Western Australia
Crawley Western Australia Australia
laura.boykin@uwa.edu.au

I am interested in invasive species (Influenza, Hepatitis C, Carribbean Fruit fly, Whitefly, Asian citrus psyllid, Gypsy moth, Aphid parasitoid, and the Oriental Fruit Fly). My expertise in genomics, phylogentic theory and utilisation of supercomputers has made a substantial contribuion to understanding the evolutionary history of the invasive species. My most influential work has come from contributions (12 publications) to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), the vector of the devastating Cassava Mosaic Viruses.
Guy Bloch
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem - None - Israel
guy.bloch@mail.huji.ac.il
Molecular Sociobiolgy
The main research interests of our group are the evolution and mechanisms underlying sociality and social behavior, we study bees as a model. To study these fascinating and intricate phenomena we integrate analyses at different levels, from molecular to social. In recent years, one of our main research focuses has been the interplay between circadian rhythms and social behavior ("sociochronobiology").
Gregor Bucher
Professor
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
gbucher1@uni-goettingen.de
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
I am interested in the developmental genetics of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum with a focus on the evolution of development. The current topics of the lab are: 1. Large scale RNAi screen "iBeetle" 2. Genetics of insect head development 3. Evolution of neural stem cells of the central complex 4. Pattern formation during meetamorphosis. 5. Development of transgenic tools (misexpression, in vivo imaging, etc).
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
Komal kumar Bollepogu Raja
student
Biochemistry and Molecular biology
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
kbollepo@mtu.edu

Studying complex color patterns in new model organisms
Simon Bullock
Dr
Cell Biology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
sbullock@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk
Mechanisms of cytoplasmic mRNA transport
Our group is interested in how mRNAs and other cargoes are sorted within the cytoplasm by microtubule-based motors. We exploit the genetics of Drosophila melanogaster for part of our work, and have optimised CRISPR/Cas tools for this organism (www.crisprflydesign.org).