Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics, and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant, you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements, and Activities.


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Participant Contact Research Focus
Peter Atkinson
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
David Marcey
Fletcher Jones Professor of Developmental Biology
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks California USA
Marcey Lab
The compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster consists of about 800 ommatidia in a polar arrangement around the dorsoventral (D-V) midline. Each ommatidium consists of eight photoreceptor cells arranged in a trapezoidal fashion with two mirror-symmetric forms, a dorsal form above the D-V midline, and a ventral form below. When differentiation of the ommatidia begins within the epithelium of the third instar larval eye-antennal imaginal disc, each ommatidium is a bilaterally symmetrical cluster of photoreceptor precursors polarized in the anteroposterior axis. These precursors become polarized on the D-V axis by proto-ommatidium rotation. The establishment of polarity along the D-V axis requires
Graham Thompson
Associate Professor
Western University
London Ontario Canada
The Social Biology Group
My lab studies the biological basis of insect social behaviour; how it evolves, how it is maintained and why some species are social while others are not. Much like human societies, eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites show bewildering complexity in how their societies are structured. Yet for insects, this complexity is derived from an economically simple division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive specialists. Studying reproductive division of labour in insects at the level of the gene can provide key insights into how complex social systems evolved from simpler, ancestral ones. Studies on social insects can also help understand
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
philip Ndaloma
Plant and Soil Sciences
Cuttington University
Monrovia Gbarnga  Liberia

Climate change impact on the re-occurrence of army worm
Mahadeva swamy H M
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bengaluru Karnataka INDIA
Bio-Pesticide Lab
Integrated Pest management, Coleoptera and plant parasitic nematodes control, Bacillus thuringiensis, RNAi in insect pest management, Formulation of agrochemicals,
Justin Overcash
Graduate Research Assistant
Texas A&M
College Station Texas USA
Adelman Lab
DNA double stranded break repair, manipulation of the classical non-homologous end joining pathway to achieved desired gene editing, gene drive mechanisms in Aedes aegypti & CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing techniques
Kristina Pilitt
O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland, College Park
Rockville MD USA
Faculty Research Assistant
Molecular genetic studies using piggBac transposon-based gene-, enhancer-, promoter-trapping system transformation vectors for creating transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Genotype analysis and characterization of transgenic mosquito lines using molecular techniques such as splinkerette PCR, inverse PCR and gene expression studies using quantitative RT-PCR.
Gary Blissard
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Hadley Horch
Associate Professor
Biology and Neuroscience
Bowdoin College
Brunswick Maine United States
Horch Lab
The Horch lab uses the cricket model system to examine the molecular neurobiological basis of injury-induced compensatory plasticity. Unlike many neuronal systems, the auditory system of the cricket demonstrates robust neuronal growth in response to deafferentation. Removing one ear induces auditory interneurons to sprout new dendrites, grow abnormally across the mid-line, and form synapses with intact auditory neurons from the opposite ear. Our research aims to unearth the molecular basis of these anatomical changes as well as understand the cellular and funcitonal consequences of this plasticity. We are also attempting to develop transgenic lines with targeted
Derric Nimmo
Product Development Manager
Public Health Research
Abingdon Milton Park United Kingdom

My career has given me a broad background in insect and parasite molecular biology. My PhD. looked for novel mechanisms of drug resistance in Leishmania sp. leading to postdoctoral work that concentrated on the genetic transformation of mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti, An, stephensi and An, gambiae) and the development of site-specific integration systems for genes. I started at Oxitec in 2005 as Head of Public Health Research with the aim of developing new RIDL systems in mosquitoes, supported by a Gates grant of $5 million. From this work we produced the new products in mosquitoes and published this work in Nature
John Tower
Biological Sciences
University of Southern California
Los Angeles California United States
Tower Lab
Gene expression during aging and predictive biomarkers of life span. Sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and p53. MnSOD and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response UPRmt 3D video tracking of flies including GFP
John Belote
Biology Department
Syracuse University
Syracuse NY USA
Belote Lab
In collaboration with the Scott Pitnick lab (Syracuse University) we are studying mechanisms of post-mating sexual selection in a variety of insects, including Drosophila, Tribolium, sepsids and yellow dung flies.
Hongmei Li-Byarlay
NRC Research Fellow
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States

I'm working on insect genomics, stress, and social behavior. My research interests include how genetic or epigenetic marks regulate gene activities in natural conditions as well as different stress conditions, or how they affects social behaviors of insects.
carole long
Chief, Malaria Immunology Section
Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
Rockville MD USA
Malaria Immunology Section
Immunity to malaria parasites including sexuals stages Vaccine development Field studies in Mali Studies of sexual stages of malaria parasites in culture and in the mosquito Mosquito membrane feeding assays and blocking of transmission with drugs or vaccines
Gulsaz Shamim
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
Vandana Hivrale
Dr. Vandana Hivrale
Department of Biochemistry and molecular biology
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Ok, USA
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
Biochemistry and molecular biology
At my institute (Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad), we are attempting to screen of non-host Protease inhibitor /Amylase inhibitor proteins for developing Helicoverpa armigera tolerance in important crop plants like pigeonpea, cotton and tomato. In India, H. armigera is responsible for preharvest losses of pigeonpea, chickpea, cotton, tomato, okra etc and storage pests such as callosobruchus and tribolium spp for post harvest damage. One of the sustainable solutions to this problem is development of insect-resistant transgenic plants using two transgenes (PI/AI), however, effect of such transgene expression in these plants has yet to be investigated.
John Rebers
Department Head
Northern Michigan University
Marquette MI USA

Structure of arthropod cuticular proteins, particularly as related to chitin binding.
George Roderick
Professor and Chair
Environmental Science
UC Berkeley
Berkeley CA USA

Invasive species, population biology, biodiversity, sustainability, biological control, global homogenization