A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Russell Groves
Professor and Extension Specialist
CV
Entomology
University of Wisconsin
Madison Wisconsin USA
rgroves@wisc.edu
Vegetable Crop Entomology
Our program is centered on the ecology and management of insects of commercial and fresh market vegetable crops
Rajal Debnath
INSECT MICROBE INTERACTION, PHYTOBIOME
CV
BIOTECHNOLOGY
CENTRAL SILK BOARD, MINISTRY OF TEXTILES, GOVT. OF INDIA
BANGALORE KARNATAKA INDIA
rajal.debnath@gmail.com

Insect-plant interactions mediated by microbes (Impact of host plant range on the microbial community in Antheraea assamensis Helfer and Samia ricini Donovan), functional ecology of gut micorbiome in insects fitness and disease resistance.
Tejas Rao
Entomology and Plant Pathology
University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Knoxville TN USA
treajo3@gmail.com
Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes Lab
Insect physiology with a focus on Bacillus thuringiensis as a control method for insect pests.
Rajendhran Rajakumar
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Genetics
Harvard Medical School
Boston MA USA
rajee_rajakumar@hms.harvard.edu
Perrimon Lab
I received my Ph.D. in Biology at McGill University in the lab of Ehab Abouheif studying the developmental basis of caste evolution in ants at the level of genes, hormones, and epigenetics. I was then a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Martin J. Cohn at the University of Florida, where I used skates and sharks to investigate the evolutionary and developmental origins of key vertebrate traits. As a post-doc in the Perrimon lab, I am utilizing Drosophila genetics to address some of the elusive mechanistic questions that I have generated over the years with non-model organisms. With ants as
Alejandra Boronat
Section on Sensory Coding and Neural Ensembles
National Instute of Child and Human Development, NIH
Bethesda MD  USA
alexboronat@gmail.com

Since 2017 I have been working as a postdoctoral fellow in Mark Stopfer´s laboratory at the National Institutes of Health, where I study neural processing of gustatory information in the moth, Manduca sexta. My long-term research interests involve a comprehensive understanding of how neural circuits underlie perception and behavior, how different aspects of normal sensory processing are established during development, and how the environment influences these processes.
Doron Zaada
CV
Entomology
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Rehovot Israel Israel
Doron.zaada@mail.huji.ac.il
Insect genetics group
The development of a novel genetic sexing strain for the Asian tiger mosquito, enabling high throughput elimination of females in early embryonic stages.
Jackson Champer
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Computational Biology and Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Cornell University
Ithaca NY United States
jc3248@cornell.edu
Messer and Clark Labs
Gene drive - experiments and modeling
Claudia Paiz
CV
Center for Biotechnology Studies
Universidad del Valle de Guatemala
Guatemala Guatemala Guatemala
cmpaiz@uvg.edu.gt
Center for Biotechnology Studies-mosquitoes lab
Our laboratory , headed by Dra. Pamela Pennington, has been working with the Sterile Insect technique for Anopheles albimanus since 2016. We are a small research laboratory, currently running projects financed by the the International Atomic Energy Agency and by Open Philantropy through CDC foundation. We are targeting several spermatogenesis genes to produce a sterile males of An. albimanus using interference RNA (RNAi). Additionally we are targeting sex biased or sex specific genes with the aim of eliminate females from SIT production.
Aude Benlali
CV
SymbioTIC
UMR PIMIT, CNRS 9192, INSERM 1187, IRD 249.
Ste Clotilde Reunion France
aude.benlali@gmail.com
SymbioTIC
I have been previously working with D. melanogaster as a model to study eye’s development in Jessica Treisman’s lab, NYU, where I generated EMS mutants, characterized complementation groups and eventually mapped mutations by plasmid transformation (1–3). I then became a teacher for several years before going back to science working on zoonoses, especially on the dynamics of zoonotic pathogens shed by bats (4, 5). I have more recently joined a company, SymbioTIC, that is developing mosquito lines for the control of Aedes albopictus through Wolbachia-mediated Cytoplasmic Incompatibility. My supervisors are Pablo Tortosa and Patrick Mavingui. We have constructed a genetic
Claudineia Costa
CV
Entomology
University of California
Riverside California USA
claudinp@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
I received my Ph.D. at the University of São Paulo in Brazil studying the dynamic population of orchid bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) in different areas in the Atlantic Forest. I am an expert in molecular biology and has worked with bees for over ten years. I have experience in Developmental Biology, focusing my research on honeybee and in the mechanisms that regulate metamorphosis in bees. In the Woodard lab, I am currently studying the mechanisms controlling larval development and ultimate body size, which are crucial for two of the organization principles of bumblebee societies: worker division of labor and caste
Eileen Knorr
Dr.
Bioresources
Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME
Gießen Hesse Germany
eileen.knorr@ime.fraunhofer.de

I'm working on the identification and characterization genes involved in the insect development and immunity, analyzing the gene expression of several immune and stress-related genes by using quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR). Another research focus is the development of new long-lasting plant protection methods. A promising new strategy for environmentally-beneficial and highly specific pest control is the use of RNAi by targeting vital genes of pest insects with double stranded RNAs to induce a lethal response.
Esmaeil Amiri
Dr.
Department of Biology
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Greensboro United States USA
e.amiri79@gmail.com
UNCG Social Insect Lab
I have been studying disease ecology of honey bee colonies since I got involve in honey bee science. Specifically, I am interested in interaction and co-evolution between honey bee queens and viruses. I have investigated several transmission pathways, that viruses use to pass the social and individual immunity and infect the queens. In many cases virus infected queens remain functional in the colony and can pass the virus to their progeny throughout produced eggs. I have investigated the vertical transmission of Deformed Wing Virus in honey bee queens and showed the virus can transmit to the next generation along the
Mara Heilig
Graduate Student
Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC United States
mch284@georgetown.edu
Armbruster Lab
I am studying the regulation of photoperiodic diapause in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus. I am particularly interested to understand the mechanism of photoperiodic time measurement in adult female mosquitoes, and how the signal of a short photoperiod is passed on to the next generation (leading to fully developed embryos that enter diapause).
Andrew Paige
CV
Molecular Entomology Laboratory, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
National Institutes of Health
Washington DC United States
andy.paige@nih.gov
Post-baccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award Fellow
Our lab has identified genes encoding salivary proteins specific to disease-transmitting female mosquitoes. I am interested in using precise genetic technologies such as CRISPR-cas9 to create mutant knockouts of these genes with the goals of determining gene function and exploring their potential as candidates for transmission blocking vaccines. We are interested in the creation of stable lines with mutations in these salivary proteins to perform biochemical assays on the adult females. This will allow us to determine the specific function in vector-host-pathogen interactions and their potential for biomedical targets in the development of novel transmission blocking strategies for vector-borne diseases.
Mugenzi Leon
Mr
CV
Biochemistry and mlecular biology
University of Buea
yaounde center Cameroon
mugenzijean007@hotmail.fr
Centre for Research in Infectious diseases
His research interest centres around understanding mechanisms of Insecticide resistance in malaria vectors. His current research is focusing on transcriptional regulation of genes conferring insecticide resistance in Anopheles funestus s.s a major malaria vector in Africa and developing molecular tools to monitor insecticide resistance spread in field mosquitoes
De-Fen Mou
Graduate student
Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Davie Florida USA
defenmou@ufl.edu

My research interest is primarily in the insect-pathogen-plant interactions. My doctoral research is focusing on the vector of palm infecting phytoplasma disease, Lethal Bronzing Disease. Knowing the vector is essential to develop effective disease management strategy.
Sajleen Phagura
Graduate Research Assistant
Molecular Cell and Systems Biology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA USA
sphag001@ucr.edu
Gill Lab
Prior studies in our lab has showed the Cry11A toxin binds to specific receptors that modulate its toxicity (Chen, Aimanova, and Gill, 2017; Lee, Aimanova, and Gill, 2014). However, at low toxin doses in wild-type mosquitoes, and at higher doses in Cry11A-resistant mosquitoes, the larvae are able to overcome these toxin doses. Mechanisms by which these changes occur are not known. Data from other investigations in the lab show that midgut cells can respond by a variety of mechanisms, possibly through changes in transcripts involved in cellular proliferation and differentiation. To fully understand these cellular responses in the
Dorian Jackson
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore MD United States
djack102@jhu.edu
McMeniman Lab
Our lab is interested in the molecular basis of host seeking in both Ae. aegypti and An. gambiae mosquitoes. The lab uses genome editing technology along with GC/MS and two-photon imaging in order to develop a deeper understanding of how volatile compounds are processed by the insect nervous system and how these interactions translate to behavioral responses involved in host seeking.
Keena Curbelo
Biological Research Technician
CV
United States Department of Agriculture
Daniel K Inouye Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center
Hilo Hawaii United States
keena@hawaii.edu
Sim Lab
Our lab utilizes both behavioral assays and genetic techniques to develop new methods of controlling agricultural insect pest species. In addition, we are looking at CRISPR/Cas-9 targeted mutagenisis to gain an understanding of how heritable mutations can supplement SIT release.
Natali Ortiz
I dont have yet
I dont have yet
Bogota Distrito Capital Colombia
naortiz82@gmail.com

I have been working with mosquitoes, ecology and I have s bit experience in vector Control.