Claudineia Costa
Postdoctoral Student
University of California
Riverside, California USA
Website
claudinp@ucr.edu
CV

Areas of Expertise:
Molecular Biology, Develpmental Biology

Research Organisms:
Bees

 

Research Focus:

I received my Ph.D. at the University of São Paulo in Brazil studying the dynamic population of orchid bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) in different areas in the Atlantic Forest. I am an expert in molecular biology and has worked with bees for over ten years. I have experience in Developmental Biology, focusing my research on honeybee and in the mechanisms that regulate metamorphosis in bees. In the Woodard lab, I am currently studying the mechanisms controlling larval development and ultimate body size, which are crucial for two of the organization principles of bumblebee societies: worker division of labor and caste determination.
Regarding my experimental skills, I have been working extensively with molecular genetics, including developmental biology, and morphology of bees. I have gained expertise in molecular biology, especially RNA interference (RNAi) as well as evaluation of the gene expression, through PCR (RT-PCR) and Real-Time PCR. In my master’s, I focused my research on honeybee Apis mellifera, and I aimed at elucidating the mechanisms that regulate metamorphosis in A. mellifera. I worked with the basic aspects of adult cuticle formation and tanning, performing RNAi-mediated knockdown of genes involved in the complete formation and tanning of the adult cuticle. In my Ph.D., I have been working on the development of a comprehensive understanding of how evolutionary history and life-history traits influence bee population stability in different landscapes. In order to evaluate the dynamic population of orchid bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae: Euglossini) in different areas in the Atlantic Forest, I evaluated the different aspects: ecological and, especially, morphological and genetics by geometric morphometrics and Population Genetics analysis. I also performed a population genomics analysis by NGS.