Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Rocio Elisa Yanes Ruano
CV
MOSCAMED
Guatemala Department of Agriculture
San Miguel Petapa Guatemala Guatemala
reyr66@gmail.com
San miguel Petapa Facilities
Anastrepha Ludens Ceratitis Capitata
Jennina Taylor-Wells
Research Scientist
Research and Development
Oxitec Ltd
Abingdon Oxfordshire England, United Kingdom
jennina.taylor-wells@oxitec.com
Oxitec Ltd
My research focus encompasses the design and creation of transgenic mosquitoes for novel vector control strategies. I am interested in novel molecular biology developments for the improved design of plasmids for insect transformation, research developments in transformation efficiency and new technologies relating to insect mass rearing.
Junesun Yoon
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
june.yoon@uky.edu
Palli Lab at U of Kentucky
RNA interference (RNAi) is a useful reverse genetic tools for investigating the gene function. Moreover, RNAi also has potential practical applications in many fields including medicine and agriculture. The variability in RNAi efficacy among insect species limits the range of its application. I am trying to understand the mechanism of RNA interference in insects to facilitate the use of RNAi to control pests. I study coleopteran insects to understand how/why RNAi works well as successful RNAi models and lepidopteran insects to investigate the barriers for efficient RNAi.
Xiudao Yu
Dr.
Citrus Research and Education Center
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL United States
yuxiudao@163.com

Insect molecular biology; Transgenic plants for insect management
Ibrahim Elsheshney
Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Economic Entomology
Plant Protection (Economic Entomology)
Tanta University, Egypt
Tanta Gharbeya Egypt
ishento@yahoo.com

• Investigating innovative methods of insect pest control such as CRISPR, RNAi, Bt … etc. • Studying insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry in -omics levels. • Exploring insect resistance, immunological and development. • Understanding Ecological and multi-trophic interactions (plant-pathogen-insect-symbionts-natural enemies) in the ecosystem and microbial Ecology of insects. • IPM and Biological control of Horticulture and vegetable Insect Pests • Nanotechnology applications in pest control
Erin Scully
Research Molecular Biologist
USDA-ARS
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit
Manhattan Kansas United States
Erin.Scully@ars.usda.gov

My research focuses on the functional genomics of sensory systems of stored product insects.
Timothy Ajiboye
Mr
Field Genebank
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology(NACGRAB), Moor Plantation, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo state Nigeria
ajiboyefemi2002@yahoo.com
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology
Molecular Characterization of Cereal stem borers. Control of cereal stemborers using host plant resistance. Conservation of Insects, Tree crops, and other Field genetic Resources.
Steve Young
School of Integrative Plant Science
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
sly27@cornell.edu

Invasive pests
Olawale Adeyinka
Molecular Biology, CEMB
University of Punjab, Pakistan
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
adeyinka.olawale@gmail.com
Seed Biotechnology
to develop a biotechnology technique that would be efficient to transform Africa indigenous crop against insect pest
Nilay Yapici
Assistant Professor, Nancy and Peter Meinig Family Investigator
CV
Department of Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University
Ithaca  NY  USA
ny96@cornell.edu
Yapici Lab
Neural circuits that regulate behavioral states, decision making, motivation and food intake.
Yoshinori Tomoyasu
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
Miami University
Oxford OH USA
tomoyay@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu lab
My research interests revolve around understanding the molecular basis underlying morphological evolution. We use insect wings as a model, and investigate the emergence and divergence of this evolutionary critical structure, that has made insects one of the most successful group of animals on this planet. We also study the systemic aspect of RNA interference (RNAi) in insects. RNAi, in which dsRNA suppresses the translation of homologous mRNA, is a highly conserved cellular defense mechanism. In some organisms, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically from cell to cell, a phenomenon termed ‘systemic RNAi’. Understanding systemic RNAi will be crucial for the
Era Vaidya
Dr
Biotic Stress Resistance
National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
New Delhi New Delhi India
vaidya.era@gmail.com

I am working on using RNA silencing strategies for control of Helicoverpa armigera, which a polyphagous pest of many crop plants
Misato Miyakawa
Dr.
Center for Bioscience Research and Education, Laboratory of Environmental Physiology
Utsunomiya University
Utsunomiya Tochigi Japan
misatorus@gmail.com

Invasive ants
Muhammad Asif Qayyoum
Dr.
CV
ENTOMOLOGY DEPARTMENT
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (PAK.)
University of Kentucky (USA)
FAISALABAD PUNJAB PAKISTAN
asifqayyoum@gmail.com
MUHAMMAD ASIF QAYYOUM
Soil/manure inhabiting mites taxonomy of mites parasitic mites
Ali Afify
CV
Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins Medical School
Baltimore Maryland USA
ali.afify@jhmi.edu

I am currently investigating the response profile of Anopheles gambiae to pheromones and repellents both at the receptor and glomerulus level.
Sheng Yang
Dr.
CV
School of Biological & Biomedical Sciences
Durham University (UK)
Iowa State University (USA)
Ames Iowa USA
yunfeiyangaini@126.com
Post-doc Research Associate
(1) Bt toxin engineering for novel hemipteran gut target sites Bt toxins have been successfully used in various transgenic crops for almost 20 years to manage lepidopteran and coleopteran pests. However, this strategy has not been used in the management of aphids and other hemipterans due to their low susceptibility to Bt toxins, potentially arising from a lack of binding to the hemipteran gut. To circumvent this limitation in pea aphids, peach-potato aphids and soybean aphids, a phage display library was screened in vivo against the aphid guts to identify candidate gut-binding peptides to add to a Bt toxin. The in
Camilo Ayra-Pardo
Postdoctoral researcher
Plant Division
CIGB
Havana Havana Cuba
cayrapardo73@gmail.com

My research experience covers the development of applied biotechnological solutions for the control of insect crop pests, as well as, the investigation of molecular aspects of host-pathogen interaction including the molecular mechanisms behind resistance evolution to microbial pesticides.
Azza Elgendy
CV
Entomology Department
Faculty of Science, Cairo University
Giza Non-US/Non-Canadian Egypt
aelgendy@sci.cu.edu.eg

Medical entomology
Meredith Hawley
Research and Development Specialist
Pest Screening
Bayer NA - CropScience Division
Morrisville North Carolina United States of America
meredith.hawley@bayer.com
Research and Development Specialist
Investigating potential traits providing pest resistance in agricultural crops of interest
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Ying Yan
Dr.
Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), Gießen, Germany
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen, Germany
Giessen Hessen Germany
yyan3@ncsu.edu
Dr.Marc Schetelig's lab
Genetic pest management
Vanessa Corby-Harris
Research Physiologist
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center
USDA-ARS
Tucson AZ USA
vanessa.corby@ars.usda.gov
Corby-Harris Lab
Our goal is to increase honey bee health through improved nutrition.
Hongwei Yao
Ph.D.
Institute of Insect Sciences
Zhejiang University
Hangzhou Zhejiang Province China
hwyao@zju.edu.cn

Identification and characterization of insecticide detoxification enzymes and their genes, in particular on the role that esterase(s) play in the detoxification of organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides in rice insect pests
Lien Thi Phuong Nguyen
Ph.D
CV
Insect Ecology Department
Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources
Hanoi Hanoi Vietnam
phuonglientit@gmail.com

My work is focusing on the inventory of hymenopterans and their ecology and behavior, especially wasps of the family Vespidae, bees of the family Apidae and ants of the family Formicidae, concentrating on the conservation of various areas within Vietnam such as limestone forest and mangrove forest.
Lyubov Yarinich
Laboratory of cell division
Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Novosibirsk Novosibirskaya oblast Russian Federation
l.yarinich@mcb.nsc.ru

Drosophila cell lines
Anna Katrina Briley
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence/ University of Florida
Jacksonville Florida US
annakatrinabriley@gmail.com

Testing and Evaluation of novel pesticide products and equipment for military use.
Tabashir Chowdhury
PhD candidate
CV
Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario Canada
tabashir@gmail.com

Genetic basis of behavioural isolation and speciation in Drosophila
Kanapathy Gajapathy
Dr
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northernprovince Sri Lanka
gayan156@gmail.com
zoology laboratory; molecular biology laboratory in University of jaffna
Focusing on evolution and phylogeny of arthropods; specifically spiders and vector species among insects
William Bart Bryant
Research Assistant Professor
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Ks usa
wbb@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel Lab
Currently my research in the Kristin Michel lab focuses on studying the interplay between fecundity and immunity in the malaria vector mosquito.
Santosh sarathy
molecular entomology
NBAIR
Bangalore Karnataka India
santoshsarathy@gmail.com

Expression profiling for insecticide resistance
Atef Sayed
CV
Biological control
Plant Protection Research
Ismailia Ismailia Egypt
atef.mahmoud1@gmail.com

Willing to collaborate on : - Genetic and molecular researches and biotechnological and nanotechnology approaches for the management of insect pests. - Improve pest control strategies and programs for major economic pests and crops through new applied research results. - Maximization of biological control and other relevant substitutes within the framework of IPM and environmentally safe methods.
Kalindu Ramyasoma
Post Graduate Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
Faculty of Science, University of Colombo
Colombo 03 Western Province Sri Lanka
kd.ramyasoma@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
My research interest focused to engineering RNA interference based resistant to all Dengue serotypes in Aedes aegypti vector mosquitos using transgenic technology. Genetic manipulation of Aedes mosquitos express RNAi genes in mosquito tissues under control of tissue specific promoters and genes repress or inhibits the expression of dengue viral proteins.
Soren Nylin
Professor
Zoology
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
soren.nylin@zoologi.su.se

Seasonal adaptations, life history, life cycle regulation in butterflies. Insect-plant relationships.
Hasan Basibuyuk
Dr
Biology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Central Anatolia Turkey
hbbuyuk@cumhuriyet.edu.tr
CUMSAG
My main research areas include higher-level phylogeny, functional morphology, and systematics of Hymenoptera. I am interested in phylogeny and taxonomy of Turkish sawflies, in particularly stem borers (Cephidae), and also molecular systematics, evolution, phylogeny and phylogeography of Anatolian biodiversity. My ongoing research projects are on the evolution of mitochondrial genome in Hymenoptera (mostly sawflies) and utility of COI and ITS2 in barcoding of holo-and hemimetabolous insects.
Zengchun Ye
Department of Internal Medicine
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston TEXAS United States
yzchun9@gmail.com

nephrology
sarah boyd
AWP
AWP
beacon NY United States
sarah.hoover.boyd@gmail.com
AWP
This is a sample entry.
JohnsonkeW Kinyua
Dr.
Department of Biochemistry
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
Nairobi Kiambu Kenya
johnsonkinyua@jkuat.ac.ke

Development of transmission blocking vaccines
Paula Roy
PhD Aspirant
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
paularoy@ku.edu

The genetics of the behavior of Drosophila courtship.
Adenike Adeyemo
Dr Mrs
Department of Biology, School of Sciences
Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
Akure,  Ondo State Nigeria
yemonike@yahoo.com
Food Storage Laboratory, Department of Biology
Stored products Entomology, Insect biochemistry with emphasis on mode of action of bio -pesticides in insects
Keshava Mysore
PhD
CV
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine - University of Notre Dame
South Bend Indiana USA
kmysore@iu.edu
Duman-Scheel Lab
I am currently studying functional and developmental neurogenetics of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.
Mubarak Hussain Syed
Dr
University of Oregon
HHMI/Institute for neurobiology
Eugene Oregon United States
mosvey@gmail.com
Doe lab
Drosophila neural Stem cell temporal identity
Ashley Peery
Entomology
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg VA United States
peerya2@vt.edu

As I pursue my PhD I am using comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary changes between species of Anopheles mosquitoes. I have created a chromosome based genome assembly for Anopheles stephensi which has allowed characterization of molecular features including genes, transposable elements, simple repeats and scaffold or matrix associated regions within the genome. I am interested in how molecular features within the genome impact the propensity for the genome to change via chromosomal inversions. The 16 genomes project has also allowed me to characterize the molecular features within the mapped genomes of mosquitoes representing ~100 MY of Anopheles evolution. This
varada abhyankar
MBRl, Department of Zoology
Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune
Pune Maharashtra India
varada.abhyankar@gmail.com
Molecular Biology Research laboratory
Epigenetic and molecular mechanisms involved in immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.
Zhao Chunyue
School of Life Sciences
Peking University
Bejing Beijing China
chunyuezhaopku@163.com

I use fly,cell culture and animal model systems to study cell death mechanisms and related drugs that can rescue or enhance cell death.
niels Wynant
PhD
Biology
Zoological Institute
Leuven Vlaams-Brabant Leuven
niels.wynant@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
Regulation of (systemic) RNA interference (RNAi) in insects
Cain Yam
Drosophila Division
BestGene Inc
Chino Hills CA USA
cain@thebestgene.com
BestGene Inc
Drosophila Microinjection Services
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
John Masly
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
University of Oklahoma
Norman OK U.S.A.
masly@ou.edu

The primary goal of the research performed in my lab is to understand the mechanisms that generate biodiversity. We use molecular and genomic technologies to study how genetic change directs the development of differences between species and ultimately gives rise to two important evolutionary processes— speciation and phenotypic evolution. We study four closely related species of fruit flies that belong to the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, which allows us to take advantage of the arsenal of genetic, genomic, and molecular tools available in D. melanogaster. More recently, we have begun to develop North American damselflies in the genus Enallagma as
Sonam Vijay
Research Associate
Protein Biochemistry and Structural Biology Lab
National Institute of Malaria Research
New Delhi Delhi INDIA
sonam.vijay@gmail.com
Research Associate
At present we are focusing on global and differential proteome analysis of An. culicifacies sensitive and refractory mosquito species. We are interested to find out those proteins in midgut and salivary glands that may have role in mechanism of refractoriness.
Martin Beye
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary Genetics
Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
martin.beye@hhu.de
Honeybee genetics, evolutionary genetics
We would like to understand the genetic basis of sex determination and social behaviors in honeybees. We have developed a method to generate high frequency integrations of the piggyBac Transposon in the honeybee
David Haymer
Professor
CV
Cell and Molecular Biology
University of Hawaii
Honolulu HI USA
dhaymer@hawaii.edu
Haymer lab
Molecular population genetics, molecular taxonomy of species complexes, Bactrocera dorsal is complex, Tephritidae
Hongmei Li-Byarlay
NRC Research Fellow
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
hlibyar@ncsu.edu

I'm working on insect genomics, stress, and social behavior. My research interests include how genetic or epigenetic marks regulate gene activities in natural conditions as well as different stress conditions, or how they affects social behaviors of insects.
Mitch McVey
Associate professor
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
mitch.mcvey@tufts.edu
The McVey lab
We use Drosophila to study DNA repair and recombination. We are particularly interested in the mechanisms by which alternative end-joining and recombinational repair of double-strand breaks results in mutagenesis and genome instability.
Dr. ATUL KUMAR PANDEY
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
Alexander Silberman Institute of life sciences
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
atulkumarpandey@gmail.com
Sociobiology Lab
Sociobiological, physiological and behavioural studies of sleep and its deprivational consequences
Magali Eychenne
Entomology
INRA
Montpellier cedex 05 Languedoc Roussillon France
magali.eychenne@univ-montp2.fr
DGIMI
Lepidopteran functionnal genomics
Bhaskar Roy
Dr.
CV
BGI- shenzhen , Beijing Research Institute
BGI, Beijing Research Institute
BGI, Beijing Genome Institute
Shenzhen  Shenzhen China
linkbhaskar@gmail.com
BGI
Insect Molecular Biology,Cancer Biology ,
Laura Boykin
Dr.
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The University of Western Australia
Crawley Western Australia Australia
laura.boykin@uwa.edu.au

I am interested in invasive species (Influenza, Hepatitis C, Carribbean Fruit fly, Whitefly, Asian citrus psyllid, Gypsy moth, Aphid parasitoid, and the Oriental Fruit Fly). My expertise in genomics, phylogentic theory and utilisation of supercomputers has made a substantial contribuion to understanding the evolutionary history of the invasive species. My most influential work has come from contributions (12 publications) to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), the vector of the devastating Cassava Mosaic Viruses.
N Wybouw
Entomology
Gent University
Gent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgie
nicky_wybouw@hotmail.com

xenobiotic metabolism of phytophagous arthropods
Hao Yu
plant protection department
Henan Institution of Science and Technology
Xinxiang City Henan Province CHINA
yuhao971222@gmail.com

transgenic technologies for the leafhopper
Gareth Lycett
Vector
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside UK
gareth.lycett@lstmed.ac.uk
Lycett Group
I am a vector molecular biologist whose main interests are focused on functional genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae. The topics explored include cellular and molecular analysis of mosquito/plasmodium interactions, developing tools for conditional expression in transgenic Anophelines, regulation of gene expression in mosquito tissues, and functional genetic analysis of insecticide resistance.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Vett Lloyd
Professor
Biology
Mt. Allison University
Sackville New Brunswick Canada
vlloyd@mta.ca
Lloyd Lab - Mt. Allison
Drosophila: Epigenetics, transgenerational effects, Wolbachia Ticks: Genome structure, population structure, Borrelia, bartonella
Julie Reynolds
Postdoctoral Researcher
Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
reynolds.473@osu.edu
Postdoctoral Researcher
Molecular, Biochemical, and Physiological aspects of diapause.
Micky Mwamuye
Molecular Biology & Bioinformatics Unit/Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab
International Centre of insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Nairobi Kenya
mmwamuye@icipe.org
Postgraduate Student
My current research focus is on the biodiversity of Ticks and tick-borne zoonoses at human-livestock-wildlife interfaces.
Kevin Nyberg
Biology
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park MD USA
kevingnyberg@gmail.com

I am currently researching the expression and evolution of long noncoding RNAs in the genus Drosophila.
Kevin Temeyer
Research Molecular Biologist
CV
Agricultural Research Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Kerrville Texas USA
kevin.temeyer@ars.usda.gov
Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory
Incumbent is a Research Molecular Biologist in the Livestock Insects Research Unit of the Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory, Kerrville, Texas. The research is a component of ARS National Program 104 – Veterinary, Medical and Urban Entomology. Incumbent is Lead Scientist for the Biting Fly CRIS Project with objectives to 1) develop new attractants, repellents, and behavior modifying chemicals based on physiology of chemical reception; 2) evaluate efficacy of novel technologies for control of flies; and 3) determine interactions between flies and microorganisms that affect survival of the insects and their capability to transmit pathogens. Incumbent is Lead Scientist
Mr. JJ Hanly
Graduate Student
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambirdge Cambridge United Kingdom
jjh55@cam.ac.uk
Butterfly Genetics Group
I am interested the role of regulatory mutations in evolution of morphology. I investigate this using the red pattern elements of the wings of Heliconius butterflies.
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Dr. Emmanuelle Jacquin-Joly
CV
EcoSens department iEES-Paris
INRA
Versailles cedex Yveline France
emmanuelle.jacquin@versailles.inra.fr
Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
My research focuses on insect chemoreception in a context of plant protection. My objectives are 1) to decipher the molecular mechanisms of olfaction and taste, focusing on chemosensory receptors, 2) to study the contribution of chemoreception to insect adaptation to new hosts and anthropic systems, 3) to investigate the evolutionary origin of insect chemosensory receptors. I am using an integrative approach from genes to behaviour, including genomics and transcriptomics approaches.
David Marcey
Fletcher Jones Professor of Developmental Biology
CV
Biology
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks California USA
marcey@clunet.edu
Marcey Lab
The compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster consists of about 800 ommatidia in a polar arrangement around the dorsoventral (D-V) midline. Each ommatidium consists of eight photoreceptor cells arranged in a trapezoidal fashion with two mirror-symmetric forms, a dorsal form above the D-V midline, and a ventral form below. When differentiation of the ommatidia begins within the epithelium of the third instar larval eye-antennal imaginal disc, each ommatidium is a bilaterally symmetrical cluster of photoreceptor precursors polarized in the anteroposterior axis. These precursors become polarized on the D-V axis by proto-ommatidium rotation. The establishment of polarity along the D-V axis requires
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Serap Aksoy
Professor
researcher
School of Public Health
Yale
New Haven Connecticut USA
serap.aksoy@yale.edu
Aksoy Lab
Our lab studies multiple aspects of tsetse flies, the vectors of African trypanosomes. Trypanosomes are the causative agents of the devastating Sleeping Sickness disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lab’s work spans a range of projects including tsetse immunity, reproduction and symbiosis, tsetse-symbiont and trypanosome interactions, tsetse genomics and population genetics, and trypanosome developmental processes in tsetse. The ultimate goal of our work is to improve current control methods and/or develop novel strategies to reduce or eliminate the transmission of Sleeping Sickness in Sub-Saharan Africa.