Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Richard Baxter
Assistant Professor
Chemistry
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
richard.baxter@yale.edu
Baxterlab
Current research within my laboratory includes the innate immune system of insect disease vectors, inhibitors of insect transglutaminases, and structural approaches for the design of novel peptide scaffolds and catalysts.
Judith Wexler
CV
Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
jrwexler@ucdavis.edu

I'm interested in the evolution of insect sexual differentiation pathways. Specifically, I'm researching how a system of sex determination via alternative splicing arose in holometabolous insects by studying sex differentiation in hemimetabolous insects.
Jiannong Xu
Associate Professor
Biology
New Mexico State University
Las Cruces NM USA
jxu@nmsu.edu

I am interested in mosquito functional genomics and symbiosis between mosquito and associated microbiome. I am also interested in the genomics of sand fly, Phlebotomus chinesis, a vector of Leishmaniasis.
Diana Cox-Foster
Professor
Entomology
Penn State
Univ. Park PA USA
dxc12@psu.edu
Cox-Foster Lab
My Lab is interested in host/pathogen interactions. We are interested in genes associated with the immune system and cuticular exoskeleton (biosynthesis and molting). We are interested in immune responses to viruses, and responses to parasites such as nematodes and varroa mites. In particular, the anti-viral immune responses are of interest, going from point of infection to death of the insect host.
Mark Blaxter
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Scotland UK
mark.blaxter@ed.ac.uk
Nematode and neglected genomics
The Blaxter nematode and neglected genomics lab uses genomics approaches, based on next-gen sequencing, to assemble, annotate and interpret the genomes of target species. While our main focus is on parasitic members of the Nematoda (we are involved in projects to understand the evolutionary genomic origins of parasitism, and collaborate with a wide range of biologists developing new drugs and vaccines for human and animal diseases), we also study free-living nematodes, nematomorphs, tardigrades, onychophorans, obscure and not so obscure arthropods... and some token lophotrochozoans, such as snails and earthworms. A second research focus in on bacterial symbionts of animals, particularly
Jun Xu
PhD student
Key Laboratory of Insect Developmental and Evolutionary Biology
Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Shanghai Shanghai China
xujun@sibs.ac.cn
Insect Molecular Genetics Lab (Yongping Huang)
Insect transgene, genome editing, Sex determination
Hanfu Xu
Associate Professor
State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Biology; College of Biotechnology
Southwest University
Chongqing Chongqing China
xuhf@swu.edu.cn
Associate Professor
1. Development of genetic manipulation tools. 2. Production of useful recombinant proteins.
Cassandra Extavour
Associate Professor
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA United States
extavour@oeb.harvard.edu
Extavour Lab
My lab is interested in the evolution of early embryonic development. We focus primarily on the evolution and development of reproductive systems, including both the germ line and the somatic components of the gonad. We use molecular genetic developmental analysis, histological analysis, and experimental embryology to study early animal embryogenesis, germ cell specification, and gonad development in several different invertebrate model systems. Our main goal is to understand the evolution of the genetic mechanisms that enabled the evolution of multicellularity, and how these mechanisms employed during early embryogenesis in extant organisms to specify cell fate, development and differentiation.