Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Jennina Taylor-Wells
Research Scientist
Research and Development
Oxitec Ltd
Abingdon Oxfordshire England, United Kingdom
jennina.taylor-wells@oxitec.com
Oxitec Ltd
My research focus encompasses the design and creation of transgenic mosquitoes for novel vector control strategies. I am interested in novel molecular biology developments for the improved design of plasmids for insect transformation, research developments in transformation efficiency and new technologies relating to insect mass rearing.
Xu Wang
Assistant Professor
Pathobiology
Auburn University
Auburn University AL United States
xzw0070@auburn.edu

Genomics, Epigenomics, Microbiome, Evolution, Gene Expression
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Ewald Große-Wilde
Evolutionary Neuroethology
MPI for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thüringen Germany
ewald.grosse.wilde@gmail.com

Arthropod chemosensation.
Kathryn Weglarz
Biology
Utah State University
Logan UT USA
kathryn.weglarz@usu.edu

I study genome evolution in insect symbionts.
Adam CN Wong
Assistant Professor
Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
adamcnwong@ufl.edu

Our laboratory is broadly interested in insect-microbe interactions that span the areas of symbiosis, pathogenesis, metabolism, nutrition and behavior. A major theme is to integrate omics, molecular and ecological approaches to better understand how the gut microbiome modulates insect physiological responses to changing environment and the virulence mechanisms of gut pathogens. We use Drosophila as our primary research model with the goal of translating into agriculturally- and medically-important insects for novel management strategies.
brian weiss
Research Scientist/Scholar and Lecturer
Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Public Health
New Haven CT USA
brian.weiss@yale.edu

My research focuses on deciphering the interactions between arthropod disease vectors and the microorganisms they house. Specifically, I work with the tsetse flies, which vector African trypanosomes. These parasites are the causative agents of human and animal African trypanosomiases in sub-saharan Africa. Tsetse also harbor a community of symbiotic (maternally transmitted) and transient (environmentally acquired) bacteria that modulate many aspects of their host's physiology. I am interested in learning how tsetse's microbiota 1) regulates the development and function of the fly's immune system, and 2) can be harnessed to reduce the fly's ability to transmit trypanosomes.
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
Kristal Watrous
Assistant Specialist
CV
Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA USA
kristal.watrous@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
I am working at the interface of pollination biology and molecular research. I study the behavior and biology of solitary and social bees native to North America, and how nutritional availability and diversity affects their physiology, gene expression, and measures of survival. I am working on laboratory rearing techniques for bumble bee species in order to bring ecological and natural history questions into the lab for experimental manipulation.
Travis van Warmerdam
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entemology and Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS United States
tcv34@msstate.edu
King Lab
I am interested in developing transgenic methods for the manipulation of invertebrate genomes. I am currently developing a gene drive plasmid in a Coleopteran species.
Daniel Hasegawa
Research Molecular Biologist
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
Charleston SC USA
daniel.k.hasegawa@gmail.com

I am broadly interested in understanding the molecular and physiological processes that drive insect-virus relationships. I have joined the IGTRCN because I am interested in utilizing gene editing technologies to: 1) further understand insect-virus relationships that have agricultural importance; 2) develop translational tools for more effective and precise insect pest management practices.
AKASHATA DAWANE
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
GBPUAT PANTNAGAR
NAGPUR MAHARASHTRA INDIA
dawaneakshata@gmail.com

I AM NOT DOING RESEARCH YET BUT VERY INTERESTED IN ENTOMOLOGY AND INSECT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND LOOK FORWARD TO BE A PART OF IT
Sarah Woodard
Assistant Professor
Department of Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside California USA
hollis.woodard@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
My research group uses bees as a model system for understanding the proximate mechanisms underlying adaptation, sensitivity, and resilience, with a focus on the behavior, physiology, and population dynamics of native bees in rapidly changing and extreme environments. We primarily use the bumble bee system for experimental research.
Mary Adewole
Miss
CV
Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology
University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo Nigeria
modupeadewole75@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
MY ACADEMIC RESEARCH FOCUS I am a young graduate female researcher with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture (Crop protection) from the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (2010). I have concluded a Master of Science Degree (2015) (Entomology) in the Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan with a Ph.D grade. Quest for more knowledge and desire to be an academia, a researcher and voice to reckon with in in the academic research world (Agriculture) have informed my stride to apply for further study to acquire Ph.D. I have been offered
Julian Dow
Professor
College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences
University of Glasgow
GLASGOW UNITED KINGDOM United Kingdom
julian.dow@glasgow.ac.uk
Dow/Davies labs
We are interested in exploiting genetics and transgenic technologies to understand how the organism works. Our particular focus is in organismal homeostasis, and thus the renal system. Most of our work is in Drosophila.
Christian Ogaugwu
Dr
Animal and Environmental Biology
Federal University Oye-Ekiti
Oye-Ekiti Ekiti State Nigeria
christian.ogaugwu@fuoye.edu.ng

Control of insect pests and disease vectors using molecular techniques. Functional insect genomics.
Judith Wexler
CV
Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
jrwexler@ucdavis.edu

I'm interested in the evolution of insect sexual differentiation pathways. Specifically, I'm researching how a system of sex determination via alternative splicing arose in holometabolous insects by studying sex differentiation in hemimetabolous insects.
Misato Miyakawa
Dr.
Center for Bioscience Research and Education, Laboratory of Environmental Physiology
Utsunomiya University
Utsunomiya Tochigi Japan
misatorus@gmail.com

Invasive ants
Jacob Stewart
Molecular Biology
University of Idaho
Moscow Id United States
jakestew@mail.com
Jake Stewart
Mating compatibility systems in Basidiomycetes, yeast genetics, plant transformation, gene drive systems, selfish elements/transposons, vector insect genetics and transformation.
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Tofazzal Hossain Howlader
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Bangladesh Agricultural University
Mymensingh Mymensingh Bangladesh
tofazzalh@gmail.com

Bacillus thuringiensis, Entomopathogenic fungi
Meredith Hawley
Research and Development Specialist
Pest Screening
Bayer NA - CropScience Division
Morrisville North Carolina United States of America
meredith.hawley@bayer.com
Research and Development Specialist
Investigating potential traits providing pest resistance in agricultural crops of interest
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Christy Waits
Bioscience Technologist
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Jacksonville FL USA
christy.m.waits.ctr@mail.mil
Testing and Evaluation Department
Test and evaluate novel pesticides and equipment for use in disease vector control.
Tabashir Chowdhury
PhD candidate
CV
Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario Canada
tabashir@gmail.com

Genetic basis of behavioural isolation and speciation in Drosophila
RANIA ABD EL-WAHAB
Assistant Professor
CV
Mites of Cotton and Field Crops
PLANT PROTECTION RESEARCH INSTITUTE
MANSOURA MANSOURA EGYPT
rania-proline@hotmail.com

NANOTECHNOLOGY,LIGHT EMITTING DIODES EFFECTS,PREDATION ON MITES
Qiang Wu
Biological Invasion
Institute of Plant Protection, CAAS
Beijing Beijing China
wuqiang8510@163.com

Genetic engineering approaches for the improvement of Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), especially on fruit flies and moths; Reproduction biology and related molecular mechanism
Jacob Wenger
Ohio State Presidential Fellow
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
wenger.93@osu.edu

I am interested in the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing adaptation in pest insect populations, and how these mechanisms can be used to develop insect resistance management plans. My current work utilizes genomic analyses to clarify the inheritance and population dynamics of virulence to plant resistance in the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). I am also interested in the role of plasticity and endosymbionts in insect adaptation.
Xianhui Wang
professor
CV
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents
Institute of Zoology
Beijing  Beijing  China
wangxh@ioz.ac.cn
Behavioral epigenetics
Insect epigenetics, behavioral plasticity, olfactory receptors
Robert Waterhouse
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
University of Geneva Medical School
Geneva Geneva Switzerland
robert.waterhouse@unige.ch
Computational Evolutionary Genomics Group
Evolutionary genomics of mosquitoes and other insects.
David Majerowicz
Msc., PhD.
Faculdade de Farmacia
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
majerowicz@pharma.ufrj.br

Use of insect as models for lipid metabolsim and obesity; Role of nuclear receptors and hormones in the control of lipid metabolism; Role of nuclear receptors in the Rhodnius prolixus - Trypanossoma cruzi interaction.
Andrew Straw
IMP Fellow
Circuit Neuroscience
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP)
Vienna Vienna Austria
andrew.straw@imp.ac.at
Straw Lab
The questions we address are as follows. 1) What are the identity and function of neurons and molecules required for specific behaviors? This is neural circuit mapping. 2) What are individual sub-behaviors an animal uses and how do these sub-behaviors interact? We define, rigorously quantify, and model these sub-behaviors and their interactions with ideas from control theory, Bayesian inference and cognitive science. This is systems behavior. 3) We want to connect these levels of understanding into a mapping that lets us traverse from neuronal implementation to computational task and behavioral context in a rigorous way. Ultimately, we aim to link
Trevor Wardill
BBSRC David Phillips Fellow
Physiology, Development and Neuroscience Department
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
tjw79@cam.ac.uk

I study how visual information in various species of flies is integrated in the brain, looking particularly how colour and motion signals are combined and used in behaviours such as finding mates and food. This research aims to discover some of the principles of how neurons decide which information is important and which to discard, and which has the greatest priority. In the coming year I will hire a postdoc to help my plans to make genetic tools that will make non-model species more accessible to transgenic alteration.
Michelle Brown
Vice President & Chief Scientist
R & D
Olfactor Laboratories Inc
Riverside California United States
mbrown@olfactorlabs.com

Olfactor Laboratories, Inc. (OLI) is designing and developing innovative products that can be part of the world-wide strategy to significantly reduce diseases spread by insects and lower the general nuisance caused by their proximity to humans. Our initial research is focused on mosquitos as they are a major cause of the spread of many debilitating and potentially lethal diseases around the world. By using safe chemicals to disrupt the insect’s olfactory system (the primary mechanism used in locating a human or other animal to use as a source of a blood-meal), OLI’s efficient and cost-effective products will seek to protect humans
Kajan Muneeswaran
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
University of Colombo
Colombo Western province Sri Lanka
kajan.muneeswaran@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
Developing transgenic mosquitoes resistant to all four dengue viral serotypes in Sri Lanka by RNA interference pathway which can be activated by the blood-meal in female mosquitoes to combat against the #1 killer dengue disease which kills more than 200 annually.
Julia Bristow
Biological Sciences
Syngeta
Bracknell Berkshire England
Julia.Bristow@syngenta.com

Molecular Biology and Genetics
niels Wynant
PhD
Biology
Zoological Institute
Leuven Vlaams-Brabant Leuven
niels.wynant@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
Regulation of (systemic) RNA interference (RNAi) in insects
Ifeoma Ezugbo-Nwobi
Parasitology and Entomology
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka Anambra Nigeria
ifeomaezugbonwobi@yahoo.com
Parasitology and Entomology Research Lab
Focused on understanding vector-borne diseases like Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Dengue, Yellow fever, etc, so that better control measures can be developed. I seek to integrate traditional parasitological and entomological procedures with molecular genetics and bioinformatics-based technologies to deliver new insights into vector biology and ecology.
YF Wang
Professor
College of Life Sciences
Central China Normal University
Wuhan Hubei Province China
yfengw@hotmail.com
Animal development and immunity
Drosophila reproduction and development; Effect of Wolbachia infection on Insect reproduction and behavior
Owain Edwards
Group Leader, Environmental Genomics
Land & Water
CSIRO
Floreat WA Australia
Owain.Edwards@csiro.au
CSIRO Environmental Genomics
Dr Owain Edwards’ research focuses on aphid-host plant interactions at the level of the organism (both aphid and plant) and the molecule, including work with colleagues in the International Aphid Genomics Consortium (IAGC) to characterise the components of aphid saliva. Dr Edwards’ work as part of the IAGC also includes a focus on epigenetic regulation of aphid polyphenism, in particular the roles of DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs in modulating aphid development. With collaborators at the University of Melbourne, Dr Edwards is investigating novel strategies to control invertebrate pests through better management of insecticide resistance, and by using
John Tower
Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
University of Southern California
Los Angeles California United States
jtower@usc.edu
Tower Lab
Gene expression during aging and predictive biomarkers of life span. Sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and p53. MnSOD and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response UPRmt 3D video tracking of flies including GFP
Ming-Cheng Wu
Department of Entomology
College of Agriculture and Natural resources, National Chung Hsing University
Taichung South dist. Taiwan
mcwu12@gmail.com

Pesticide effects on insects, including honeybee and fruit fly. Developing bio-pesticides.
Tom Walsh
Research Scientist
Land and Water
CSIRO
Canberra ACT Australia
tom.walsh@csiro.au

I'm particularly interested in resistance to pesticides and using genomic and molecular techniques to investigate the evolutionary history and functional biology of these traits.
Jonathan Wang
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
jonbwang@yahoo.com

I am working on projects that aim to identify genes playing a role in fungal susceptibility/resistance in Drosophila, elucidate fungal interactions, and genetically engineer fungus for agricultural applications.
Markus Brown
Entomology
University of Maryland
Beltsville MD USA
markus.a.brown@hotmail.com

Cells experience a variety of stresses in their environment, whether from friend, foe, or terrain, and must adapt to their changing environment to maintain their survival. This occurs in two ways, evolution and epigentic modifications. Evolution is the much slower process by which the cell permanently alters the enzymes in its arsenal, whilst epigenetics are a quick, temporary change in pace caused by fleeting stresses in the environment. I hope to elucidate the mechanisms by which fungi use epigenetics to quickly mediate and monitor their gene expression profiles in response to alterations in their environment.
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Hu Wan
Dr.
College of Plant Science and Technology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan Hubei China
huwan@mail.hzau.edu.cn

Insect Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Insect Functional Genomics, Development of Recombinant Viral Pesticides
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
N Wybouw
Entomology
Gent University
Gent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgie
nicky_wybouw@hotmail.com

xenobiotic metabolism of phytophagous arthropods
Mustafa Wajidi
Associate Professor
CV
School of Distance Education
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Minden Pulau Pinang Malaysia
mfadzil@usm.my
Molecular Entomology Research Group
Current research focuses on insect molecular biology, in particular, trying to elucidate the role of cytochromes P450 in metabolism of xenobiotics
Elizabeth Walker
Lab Manager/Research Tech Sr.
EEB
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan United States
walkeliz@umich.edu
Wittkopp Lab
I am broadly interested in evolutionary development and how that plays a role in the diversity of organisms, including gene regulation
Patricia Wittkopp
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan USA
wittkopp@umich.edu
Wittkopp lab
Our research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution. The evolution of development, especially mechanisms controlling gene regulation, are of particular interest. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work.
Marla Sokolowski
University Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto
Toronto Ontario Canada
marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca
Sokolowski Lab: Genes, Environment and Behaviour
We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences (gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect behavior. Experiential affects, like developmental ones can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but
Steve Stowers
Assistant professor
Cell Biology and Neuroscience
Montana State University
Bozeman Montana United States
sstowers@montana.edu

How sensory information is processed by the nervous system to produce behavioral outputs is a long-standing problem in neuroscience, but one far from being understood. My lab exploits the many advantages of the Drosophila model system to study the relationship between somatosensory input and behavior. Our overall strategy is to first map neural circuits associated with specific somatosensory neurons and then manipulate and measure neuronal activity within the circuit to elucidate the fundamental principles of neuronal circuit logic. Since the depth with which a neural circuit will be understood will correlate with the precision with which it can be manipulated, we
Takahiro Kikawada
Principal Researcher/ Associate Professor
Insect Mimetics Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (Japan)/ The University of Tokyo
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
kikawada@affrc.go.jp
Anhydrobiosis Research Group- Kikawada Lab
We study the molecular mechanisms underlying an extreme desiccation tolerance, anhydrobiosis in the African midge, Polypedilum vanderplanki, which can revive even if they are completely dehydrated. In the process of this study, we identified several key genes involved in anhydrobiosis, such as LEA proteins and trehalose transporters. Now we have started integrative omics projects of the midge to understand comprehensively the mechanisms.
Wannes Dermauw
Dr.
Crop Protection
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
wannes.dermauw@ugent.be
Acarology
The Acarology lab has a long tradition in studying fundamental and applied aspects of arthropod crop pests. One of the main achievements of our group was the establishment of a new resistance paradigm in arthropods, by documenting the role of heteroplasmy in insecticide resistance (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008). We have also documented the evolutionary adaptation to several xenobiotics, hereby often uncovering the mode of action of agrochemicals in spider mites (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008, 2012, Dermauw et al. 2012). In recent years, our group was one of the key players in a collaborative project to sequence and
Yannick Wurm
Lecturer
CV
Organismal Biology
Queen Mary University of London
London London United Kingdom
y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk
Ants, Genomes & Evolution
Social evolution, population genomics, bioinformatics
Jonas Schwirz
Project Group Bioresources
Fraunhofer IME
Giessen Hessen Germany
jonas.schwirz@ime.fraunhofer.de

Drosophila genetics and transgenesis
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Luc Swevers
Dr
Biosciences & Applications
NCSR "Demokritos"
Aghia Paraskevi (Athens) Attiki Greece
swevers@bio.demokritos.gr
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
1) Molecular analysis of the developmental program that directs follicular cell differentiation during oogenesis in silkmoths : in vitro culture of ovarioles, molecular analysis of ecdysone response, analysis of transcription factor function, functional analysis of the nuclear receptor BmE75 during the transition from vitellogenesis to choriogenesis. 2) Analysis of small RNA pathways in lepidopteran insects: the RNA-binding proteins R2D2 and Translin. Development of methods to increase the efficiency of RNAi in lepidopteran insects. 3) Development of methods for control of insect pests: development of baculoviruses as transformation vectors, exploration of transposable elements for insect transformation, environmental RNAi, insect growth regulators. 4)
Leonard Rabinow
professor
Biology
Univ. Paris Sud
Orsay none France
leonard.rabinow@u-psud.fr

Regulation of sex determination, apoptosis, and signal transduction via phosphorylation by LAMMER protein kinases
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Micky Mwamuye
Molecular Biology & Bioinformatics Unit/Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab
International Centre of insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Nairobi Kenya
mmwamuye@icipe.org
Postgraduate Student
My current research focus is on the biodiversity of Ticks and tick-borne zoonoses at human-livestock-wildlife interfaces.
Marten Edwards
Assoc. Professor
Biology
Muhlenberg College
Allentown PA USA
edwards@muhlenberg.edu
Edwards
I am interested in corpora allata expression in Aedes aegypti. I have prepared 8 constructs that contain 1-3 kb upstream regions of JH biosynthetic enzyme genes fused to EGFP and would like to test them in transgenic Ae. aegypti. If anyone is interested in collaborating with me to test these constructs, please contact me.
Alexandra Wilson
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
acwilson@bio.miami.edu
Wilson Group
The Wilson Group's research focuses on the symbiosis of sap-feeding insects with their obligate intracellular bacterial symbionts. Working within an evolutionary framework they use protein expression systems and immunolocalization to functionally characterize amino acid transporters at the symbiotic interface of sap-feeding insects.
Thomas Werner
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
twerner@mtu.edu
Werner Lab
Evo-devo and toxicology in Drosophila. Please visit: http://www.mtu.edu/biological/department/faculty/werner/
Prof. Dr. Ernst A. Wimmer
CV
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August University Goettingen
Goettingen Lower Saxony Germany
ewimmer@gwdg.de
Developmental Biology and Insect Biotechnology
The research in the department of developmental biology covers a variety of developmental and physiological processes (e.g. head development, brain development, limb development, segmentation, germ cell differentiation, development and function of stink glands, as well as olfaction), their molecular basis, and their evolutionary conservation or diversification. In addition, novel approaches to insect pest management are developed using developmental genes and molecular biology tools. The animal model systems used at the department include a series of arthropods: insects, crustaceans, spiders.
LJ Zwiebel
Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Vanderbilt University/Medical Center
Nashville TN USA
l.zwiebel@vanderbilt.edu
LJZlab
We are examining the molecular events of olfaction as this sensory modality predominates most of the relevant behaviors in ants as well as host preference and several other behaviors in mosquitoes to thereby make significant impact to vectorial capacity. Working together with several outstanding collaborators here at Vanderbilt and around the world, we are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which insects transduce chemical signals from their environment into neuronal activity and ultimately behavior. Within Anopheles, we focus specifically on the genetic basis for anthropophily- the characteristic preference for human biting that significantly drives malaria transmission by An. gambiae.
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA
adingwall@luc.edu

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Judith Willis
Professor Emerita
Cellular Biology
University of Georgia
Athens GA USA
jhwillis@uga.edu

We study the structural cuticular proteins of Anopheles gambiae. Anopheles devotes about 2% of all its protein coding gens these proteins. We have annotated the genes, established the presence of the corresponding proteins in the cuticle with LC-MS/MS analyses. We have published expression patterns for most throughout development. Others have implicated some in insecticide resistance and in the difference between M (now An. coluzzii) and S forms. We have used in situ hybridization to learn where the genes are expressed and immunolocalization on EM sections to learn where in the cuticle the proteins are localized.
Dr. Jamie Walters
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
jrwalters@ku.edu
James R. Walters Profile
The adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Dr. Susan Brown
Distinguished Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
sjbrown@ksu.edu
Brown Lab
The Brown lab is using the Irys high-throughput genome mapping platform from BioNano Genomics to improve the Tribolium castaneum genome.