Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Xu Wang
Assistant Professor
Pathobiology
Auburn University
Auburn University AL United States
xzw0070@auburn.edu

Genomics, Epigenomics, Microbiome, Evolution, Gene Expression
Kathryn Weglarz
Biology
Utah State University
Logan UT USA
kathryn.weglarz@usu.edu

I study genome evolution in insect symbionts.
Adam CN Wong
Assistant Professor
Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
adamcnwong@ufl.edu

Our laboratory is broadly interested in insect-microbe interactions that span the areas of symbiosis, pathogenesis, metabolism, nutrition and behavior. A major theme is to integrate omics, molecular and ecological approaches to better understand how the gut microbiome modulates insect physiological responses to changing environment and the virulence mechanisms of gut pathogens. We use Drosophila as our primary research model with the goal of translating into agriculturally- and medically-important insects for novel management strategies.
brian weiss
Research Scientist/Scholar and Lecturer
Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Public Health
New Haven CT USA
brian.weiss@yale.edu

My research focuses on deciphering the interactions between arthropod disease vectors and the microorganisms they house. Specifically, I work with the tsetse flies, which vector African trypanosomes. These parasites are the causative agents of human and animal African trypanosomiases in sub-saharan Africa. Tsetse also harbor a community of symbiotic (maternally transmitted) and transient (environmentally acquired) bacteria that modulate many aspects of their host's physiology. I am interested in learning how tsetse's microbiota 1) regulates the development and function of the fly's immune system, and 2) can be harnessed to reduce the fly's ability to transmit trypanosomes.
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
Kristal Watrous
Assistant Specialist
CV
Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA USA
kristal.watrous@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
I am working at the interface of pollination biology and molecular research. I study the behavior and biology of solitary and social bees native to North America, and how nutritional availability and diversity affects their physiology, gene expression, and measures of survival. I am working on laboratory rearing techniques for bumble bee species in order to bring ecological and natural history questions into the lab for experimental manipulation.
Sarah Woodard
Assistant Professor
Department of Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside California USA
hollis.woodard@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
My research group uses bees as a model system for understanding the proximate mechanisms underlying adaptation, sensitivity, and resilience, with a focus on the behavior, physiology, and population dynamics of native bees in rapidly changing and extreme environments. We primarily use the bumble bee system for experimental research.
Judith Wexler
CV
Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
jrwexler@ucdavis.edu

I'm interested in the evolution of insect sexual differentiation pathways. Specifically, I'm researching how a system of sex determination via alternative splicing arose in holometabolous insects by studying sex differentiation in hemimetabolous insects.
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Christy Waits
Bioscience Technologist
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Jacksonville FL USA
christy.m.waits.ctr@mail.mil
Testing and Evaluation Department
Test and evaluate novel pesticides and equipment for use in disease vector control.
Qiang Wu
Biological Invasion
Institute of Plant Protection, CAAS
Beijing Beijing China
wuqiang8510@163.com

Genetic engineering approaches for the improvement of Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), especially on fruit flies and moths; Reproduction biology and related molecular mechanism
Jacob Wenger
Ohio State Presidential Fellow
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
wenger.93@osu.edu

I am interested in the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing adaptation in pest insect populations, and how these mechanisms can be used to develop insect resistance management plans. My current work utilizes genomic analyses to clarify the inheritance and population dynamics of virulence to plant resistance in the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). I am also interested in the role of plasticity and endosymbionts in insect adaptation.
Xianhui Wang
professor
CV
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents
Institute of Zoology
Beijing  Beijing  China
wangxh@ioz.ac.cn
Behavioral epigenetics
Insect epigenetics, behavioral plasticity, olfactory receptors
Robert Waterhouse
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
University of Geneva Medical School
Geneva Geneva Switzerland
robert.waterhouse@unige.ch
Computational Evolutionary Genomics Group
Evolutionary genomics of mosquitoes and other insects.
Trevor Wardill
BBSRC David Phillips Fellow
Physiology, Development and Neuroscience Department
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
tjw79@cam.ac.uk

I study how visual information in various species of flies is integrated in the brain, looking particularly how colour and motion signals are combined and used in behaviours such as finding mates and food. This research aims to discover some of the principles of how neurons decide which information is important and which to discard, and which has the greatest priority. In the coming year I will hire a postdoc to help my plans to make genetic tools that will make non-model species more accessible to transgenic alteration.
niels Wynant
PhD
Biology
Zoological Institute
Leuven Vlaams-Brabant Leuven
niels.wynant@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
Regulation of (systemic) RNA interference (RNAi) in insects
YF Wang
Professor
College of Life Sciences
Central China Normal University
Wuhan Hubei Province China
yfengw@hotmail.com
Animal development and immunity
Drosophila reproduction and development; Effect of Wolbachia infection on Insect reproduction and behavior
Ming-Cheng Wu
Department of Entomology
College of Agriculture and Natural resources, National Chung Hsing University
Taichung South dist. Taiwan
mcwu12@gmail.com

Pesticide effects on insects, including honeybee and fruit fly. Developing bio-pesticides.
Tom Walsh
Research Scientist
Land and Water
CSIRO
Canberra ACT Australia
tom.walsh@csiro.au

I'm particularly interested in resistance to pesticides and using genomic and molecular techniques to investigate the evolutionary history and functional biology of these traits.
Jonathan Wang
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
jonbwang@yahoo.com

I am working on projects that aim to identify genes playing a role in fungal susceptibility/resistance in Drosophila, elucidate fungal interactions, and genetically engineer fungus for agricultural applications.
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Hu Wan
Dr.
College of Plant Science and Technology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan Hubei China
huwan@mail.hzau.edu.cn

Insect Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Insect Functional Genomics, Development of Recombinant Viral Pesticides
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
N Wybouw
Entomology
Gent University
Gent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgie
nicky_wybouw@hotmail.com

xenobiotic metabolism of phytophagous arthropods
Mustafa Wajidi
Associate Professor
CV
School of Distance Education
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Minden Pulau Pinang Malaysia
mfadzil@usm.my
Molecular Entomology Research Group
Current research focuses on insect molecular biology, in particular, trying to elucidate the role of cytochromes P450 in metabolism of xenobiotics
Elizabeth Walker
Lab Manager/Research Tech Sr.
EEB
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan United States
walkeliz@umich.edu
Wittkopp Lab
I am broadly interested in evolutionary development and how that plays a role in the diversity of organisms, including gene regulation
Patricia Wittkopp
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan USA
wittkopp@umich.edu
Wittkopp lab
Our research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution. The evolution of development, especially mechanisms controlling gene regulation, are of particular interest. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work.
Yannick Wurm
Lecturer
CV
Organismal Biology
Queen Mary University of London
London London United Kingdom
y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk
Ants, Genomes & Evolution
Social evolution, population genomics, bioinformatics
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Alexandra Wilson
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
acwilson@bio.miami.edu
Wilson Group
The Wilson Group's research focuses on the symbiosis of sap-feeding insects with their obligate intracellular bacterial symbionts. Working within an evolutionary framework they use protein expression systems and immunolocalization to functionally characterize amino acid transporters at the symbiotic interface of sap-feeding insects.
Thomas Werner
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
twerner@mtu.edu
Werner Lab
Evo-devo and toxicology in Drosophila. Please visit: http://www.mtu.edu/biological/department/faculty/werner/
Prof. Dr. Ernst A. Wimmer
CV
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August University Goettingen
Goettingen Lower Saxony Germany
ewimmer@gwdg.de
Developmental Biology and Insect Biotechnology
The research in the department of developmental biology covers a variety of developmental and physiological processes (e.g. head development, brain development, limb development, segmentation, germ cell differentiation, development and function of stink glands, as well as olfaction), their molecular basis, and their evolutionary conservation or diversification. In addition, novel approaches to insect pest management are developed using developmental genes and molecular biology tools. The animal model systems used at the department include a series of arthropods: insects, crustaceans, spiders.
Judith Willis
Professor Emerita
Cellular Biology
University of Georgia
Athens GA USA
jhwillis@uga.edu

We study the structural cuticular proteins of Anopheles gambiae. Anopheles devotes about 2% of all its protein coding gens these proteins. We have annotated the genes, established the presence of the corresponding proteins in the cuticle with LC-MS/MS analyses. We have published expression patterns for most throughout development. Others have implicated some in insecticide resistance and in the difference between M (now An. coluzzii) and S forms. We have used in situ hybridization to learn where the genes are expressed and immunolocalization on EM sections to learn where in the cuticle the proteins are localized.
Dr. Jamie Walters
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
jrwalters@ku.edu
James R. Walters Profile
The adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)