Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Fotini Koutroumpa
ECOSENS, iEES-Paris
INRA Versailles
Versailles Ille de France France
fotini.koutroumpa@gmail.com

I am interested in the characterization of genes involved in insects' chemosensation and particularly the ones involved in pheromone and food perception
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
Anandrao Patil
CV
Department of Bioresource Science
Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India
Fukuoka Fukuoka Japan
anandbiotechniques@gmail.com
Laboratory of Insect Genome Science
Insect Molecular Biology, small non-coding RNAs
Lucia Proietti
CV
Zoology
Central University of Venezuela
Hialeah  Florida USA
proietti.dempaire@gmail.com

In my bachelor degree ( from Central University of Venezuela): I worked with Trypanosoma evansi and then I got some ability in trypanosomes diagnosis by PCR and supported the experiments about recombinant protein between T vivax cysteine protease and HSP70. In my PhD (from Ferrara University, Italy): I worked with T brucei 6PGDH. I studied:
Maria Soto-Aguilar
Project Scientist
Department of Plant Pathology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
msotoaguilar@ucdavis.edu

plant-pathogen-vector interaction
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
LI TIAN
Ph.D
Biology
Penn State University
University Park PA United States
lzt22@psu.edu
Hines Lab
Evolutionary developmental biology of mimetic coloration in bumblebee
Anna Crist
Genomes and Genetics
Institut Pasteur
Paris Ile de france France
anna-beth.crist@pasteur.fr

Genetic modification of mosquitoes and nematodes
David Arnosti
Professor
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Michigan State University
East Lansing MI USA
arnosti@msu.edu

Our research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in the context of Drosophila development. We utilize genetic and molecular biological approaches to study the role of enhancers in regulation of signaling and patterning circuits, including insulin signaling, retinoblastoma-mediated control of growth related genes, and chromatin-modulating complexes important for development. Evolutionary perspectives lead us to consider how these processes are active in non-model insects, as well as vertebrates.
Courtney Clark-Hachtel
Doctoral Candidate
CV
Department of Biology
Miami Univerisity
Oxford OH United States
clarkcm6@miamioh.edu

Studying the evolutionary origin of the novel insect wing using various arthropods.
Kara Boltz
Postdoctoral Research Scholar
Entomology & Plant Pathology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
kaboltz@ncsu.edu

Design and evaluation of gene drives in fly pests.
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Jennina Taylor-Wells
Research Scientist
Research and Development
Oxitec Ltd
Abingdon Oxfordshire England, United Kingdom
jennina.taylor-wells@oxitec.com
Oxitec Ltd
My research focus encompasses the design and creation of transgenic mosquitoes for novel vector control strategies. I am interested in novel molecular biology developments for the improved design of plasmids for insect transformation, research developments in transformation efficiency and new technologies relating to insect mass rearing.
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Matthew Edgington
Dr
Artropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
matt.edgington@pirbright.ac.uk

Mainly working on mathematical modelling of engineered underdominance gene drive systems in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes but also some other classes of gene drive.
Antonis Giakountis
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larisa Larisa Greece
agiakountis@uth.gr
Molecular Biology and Genomics
long non-coding RNAs, chromatin architecture, epigenomics, transcriptional regulation, development
Debdeep Dutta
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics
B.H.U.
Varanasi Uttar Pradesh India
debdeep.brc@gmail.com

Currently, I am working on regulation of Notch signaling and its crosstalk with other signaling pathways
Austin Compton
Biochemistry
Virginia Tech
Newport Virginia United States
austc14@vt.edu

I am interested in delineating the biological mechanism of sex determination in different Anopheles mosquitoes by characterizing the role of male-determining (M) factors.
Nicole Gutzmann
Graduate Student
Entomology
NCSU
Raleigh NC United States
negutzma@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
Functional and social analysis of pest management technologies and their development
Johan Ariff Mohtar
Mr
CV
Department of Chemical Engineering Technology (Industrial Biotechnology)
Universiti Malaysia Perlis
Kampus UniCiti Alam, Sungai Chuchuh, Padang Besar Perlis Malaysia
joarach82@gmail.com
Tissue Culture and Biomolecular Laboratory
For the past two years, I have been engaging in the spider silk research for tissue engineering application. Spider silk gland from the basal lineage of spider species provides a promising platform as a potential bioreactor for recombinant protein production. I am pursuing a PhD study in the effort of developing transgenic social spiders for such purpose
Neal Dittmer
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
ndittmer@ksu.edu

I’m interested in exploring how insects make their cuticle (exoskeleton). My main focus is on the proteins present in the cuticle and how they differ between cuticle that is hard versus cuticle that is flexible. I am also interested on how these cuticular proteins may be cross-linked together to help stabilize the cuticle (a process known as sclerotization). One important enzyme in this process is laccase, a member of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family. Many insects have multiple MCO genes and their physiological functions are unknown but likely extend beyond sclerotization. Understanding how the insect cuticle is made may lead
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
Richard Baxter
Assistant Professor
Chemistry
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
richard.baxter@yale.edu
Baxterlab
Current research within my laboratory includes the innate immune system of insect disease vectors, inhibitors of insect transglutaminases, and structural approaches for the design of novel peptide scaffolds and catalysts.
Kristal Watrous
Assistant Specialist
CV
Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA USA
kristal.watrous@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
I am working at the interface of pollination biology and molecular research. I study the behavior and biology of solitary and social bees native to North America, and how nutritional availability and diversity affects their physiology, gene expression, and measures of survival. I am working on laboratory rearing techniques for bumble bee species in order to bring ecological and natural history questions into the lab for experimental manipulation.
Pratibha Srivastava
Biological Scientist IV
CV
Division of Plant Industry
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Gainesville Florida USA
pratibha.srivastava@freshfromflorida.com

Our goal is to increase identification capacity and strengthen detection technology, for pests of regulatory significance. Our objective is to improve all aspects of early detection technologies and resources and to develop or improve detection tests and identification capacity for species in a wide range of taxonomic groups containing high priority pests.
mike tropak
dr
Genetics and Genome Biology
Sickkids
toronto ON Canada
mbt@sickkids.ca
Schulze
metabolism
Mridula Gupta
CV
Department of Entomology
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Research Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
mridulagupta10@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
Presently, I am working as Research Fellow at Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station,Faridkot, Punjab, India. The prime focus of my research is to identify the vital targets/ genes in Bemisia tabaci, A. biguttulla biguttulla and Earias sp, which are amenable to RNAi. We are trying to target osomregulation in hemipeteran insect through downregulation of aquaporin, calcitonin like receptor and diuretic hormone (DH-31). In Earias sp our focus is on disruption of ecdysis and other vital physiological process such as vitellogensis. We are also trying to improve the efficiency of RNAi in hemipeteran and lepidopteran insects using nanoparticles (chitosan and carbon quantum
Samuel Arsenault
Mr.
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States of America
sva@uga.edu
Brendan G. Hunt: Evolutionary Insect Genetics Lab
My research focusses on understanding the genetic and epigenetic underpinnings of social polymorphism in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. We seek to understand which genetic and behavioral cues maintain the colony structures of these organisms in their North American range. Additionally, we implement a phylogenetics-based approach for understanding the evolution of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in Hymenoptera.
MUJEEB OLUSHOLA SHITTU
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Michigan Technological University
HOUGHTON Michigan United States
mshittu@mtu.edu
Werner's Lab
Studying the evolution and development of complex colour patterns in Drosophila guttifera
Gajalakshmi Muthu
CV
of Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
Bangalore  karanataka India
gajalakshmiagri@gmail.com

Molecular Entomology, Insecticide Resistance, Taxonomy
G Sharath Chandra
PDF
CV
Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
sharathgsc@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
RNA interference (RNAi) mediated management of Insect pests; Development of Transgenic plants for pest resistance, drought tolerance; Nutritional quality improvement.
Rubina Chongtham
Botany
University of Delhi
Delhi Delhi India
chrubina1@yahoo.co.in

Aphids are important crop pests. Understanding plant-aphid interactions can give great insights into not only aphid biology, but also methods of crop-protection. My focus is on using transcriptomics and functional genomics in order to develop improved plant variety using RNAi.
Gaël Le Trionnaire
Research Scientist
Plant health and protection
INRA, France
Le Rheu Brittany France
gael.le-trionnaire@inra.fr
Ecology and Genetic of Insects
Functional Genomics in Aphids. We are particularly interested on how aphids can perceive changes in day length to switch from asexual to sexual reproduction. We thus develop integrative genomics (RNA-seq, FAIRE-seq and ChIP-seq) to understand large scale genome expression changes but are also currently setting up a step-by-step protocol of targeted mutagenesis with CRISPR-Cas9 system to precisely test for the real function of candidate genes in the photoperiodic response.
Elizabeth Brandt
Entomology
University of Maryland
Potomac MD USA
brandte13@gmail.com

Metabolic detox pathways of insects
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Aniruddha Pandit
Mr
College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences
University of Glasgow
Glasgow Scotland United Kingdom
Aniruddha.Pandit@glasgow.ac.uk

Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, Pest Management, Entomology
kanakala surapathrudu
post doctoral Research fellow
Department of Entomology
Agricultural Research Organization
Bet Dagan, Israel. Israel Israel
kanakalavit@gmail.com

RNAi
Yoshinori Tomoyasu
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
Miami University
Oxford OH USA
tomoyay@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu lab
My research interests revolve around understanding the molecular basis underlying morphological evolution. We use insect wings as a model, and investigate the emergence and divergence of this evolutionary critical structure, that has made insects one of the most successful group of animals on this planet. We also study the systemic aspect of RNA interference (RNAi) in insects. RNAi, in which dsRNA suppresses the translation of homologous mRNA, is a highly conserved cellular defense mechanism. In some organisms, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically from cell to cell, a phenomenon termed ‘systemic RNAi’. Understanding systemic RNAi will be crucial for the
Jeff Demuth
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington Texas United States
jpdemuth@uta.edu
Demuth Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics. Speciation. Sex chromosome evolution. Gene family evolution. Sexual selection.
Loic Revuelta
Senior Scientist (Insect Scientist)
Research & Development
Oxitec
Abingdon Oxfordshire United Kingdom
loicrl@gmail.com

I am interested in all areas of molecular entomology and insect biotechnology that could provide a basis for the research of novel insect control strategies. My current research focuses on the design and creation of transgenic Diptera for use in the field. My efforts encompass production, testing and support of all rearing aspects - including development of new rearing approaches - and also the molecular biology for the design of the genetic constructs for transformation.
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Jacob Stewart
Molecular Biology
University of Idaho
Moscow Id United States
jakestew@mail.com
Jake Stewart
Mating compatibility systems in Basidiomycetes, yeast genetics, plant transformation, gene drive systems, selfish elements/transposons, vector insect genetics and transformation.
Ma.Anita Bautista
Dr.
CV
Functional Genomics Laboratory
National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Quezon City National Capital Region Philippines
mambautista69@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
I currently handle research projects involving transcriptome and genome analyses of termites and selected insect pests of coconut and rice, an insect parasitoid, stingless bees, plant pathogens, and Philippine coconut varieties.
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Linda Kothera
Microbiologist
Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Fort Collins CO US
lkothera@cdc.gov

Genetic changes associated with insecticide resistance in vector mosquitoes.
Juan Hurtado
Ecology, Genetics and Evolution
IEGEBA - University of Buenos Aires
C.A. Buenos Aires C.A. Buenos Aires Argentina
hurtado.juanp@gmail.com

Reproductive Biology and Evolution
Ines Elena Martin-Martin
Postdoc Visiting Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratoy of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/National Institutes of Health
Rockville Maryland United States
ines.martin-martin@nih.gov

My research focuses on the study of insect's salivary proteins and their relationship with blood-feeding process and transmission of vector-borne pathogens.
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Tonya Colpitts
Assistant Professor
CV
Pathology Microbiology & Immunology
University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Columbia SC USA
tonya.colpitts@uscmed.sc.edu
COLPITTS LAB
Our laboratory researches the interactions between arboviruses and mosquito vectors, with a focus on dengue virus and the Aedes midgut. We are also examining the impact of human serum components on mosquito immunity and virus infection and developing transmission blocking vaccines against arboviruses.
Phanidhar Kukutla
Postdoctoral research associate
Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care
Mass General Hospital
Charlestown Massachusetts  USA
pkukutla@mgh.harvard.edu

I am interested in pursuing research that addresses questions related to biology/physiology of disease vectors, host-microbe-pathogen interactions, molecular genetics of host-associated bacteria, and engineering microbes for pharmaceutical/biotech applications.
Wendy Smith
Associate Professor and Interim Chair
Biology
Northeastern University
Boston MA USA
w.smith@neu.edu

Regulation of insect growth, development, and immunity
Kumaresan Ramanathan
Associate Professor
CV
Biochemistry Unit,Institute of Biomedical Science,College of Health Sciences
Mekelle University (Ayder Campus)
Mekelle Tigray Region Ethiopia
kumaresanramanatha@gmail.com
Biomarkers Research Lab
1. Study on Regulation of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Metabolism using PCSK9 Gene Silencing Initially we have done this study in computational approach and the results were quite interesting. Background & Aim: With nearly 32.4 million people are affected every year with Myocardial infarction (MI), Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) and strokes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to abnormal lipid metabolism. Combating and preventing abnormality in lipid metabolism becomes a pivotal criteria for research. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulating protein, it promotes the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL-R) and hence increases LDL-C levels. Mutations that block the
Zeeshan Shaukat
Dr
CV
Genetics and Evolution
University of Adelaide
Adelaide South Australia Australia
zeeshan.shaukat@adelaide.edu.au
Gregory Lab
Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. As CIN is not found in normal cells, it offers a cancer-specific target for therapy. We generated a CIN model in Drosophila by knocking down the spindle checkpoint, and screened for candidate knockdowns that induce apoptosis only in CIN cells. Genes identified include those involved in the DNA damage/repair pathway, JNK signaling pathway, mitotic cytoskeletal regulation and metabolism. The screen demonstrates that it is feasible to selectively kill cells with CIN. CIN is linked to the
SONAI RAJAN THANGARAJ
Dr
Agricultural Entomology
Tamil Nadu Agriculture University
Coimbatore  Tamil Nadu  India
snraja_insect@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Ecology Lab, Department of Plant Biotechnology, Centre for Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Population genetics of stored grain insect pests and honey bees Transcriptome Analaysis
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Erica Lindroth
Testing and Evaluation
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
Jacksonville Florida USA
erica.j.lindroth.mil@mail.mil

My research focuses on the development and evaluation of vector control technology for military use.
Girish Neelakanta
Assistant Professor (tenure-track)
Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk VA USA
gneelaka@odu.edu
Neelakanta Lab
My laboratory studies host-microbe interactions at the molecular level. Current focus is to understand interactions of vector-borne pathogens with their arthropod vectors (both hard and soft ticks) and their mammalian hosts. In addition, we study several aspects of vector biology in terms of understanding arthropod feeding, behavior to environment stimuli and symbiosis with microbes. We use combination of genetics, molecular biology, genomics, immunology, cell biology and microbiology approaches to decipher important aspects of these interactions.
Patricia Pietrantonio
Professor and AgriLife Research Fellow
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station  TX USA
p-pietrantonio@tamu.edu
Insect Toxicology and Physiology
Insect and tick endocrinology with emphasis in G protein-coupled receptors
Katrina Klett
Agronomy
Vietnam National University of Agriculture
Hanoi  Hanoi Vietnam
katrina.klett@gmail.com
Tropical Bee and Beekeeping Research Institute
I am interested in honey bee breeding as a means of selecting for genetic resistance to pathogens and producing robust and healthy bees.
kaleem Tariq
Entomology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan Hubei China
kaleem_arain194@hotmail.com

Role of miRNAs in spermatogenesis
Laura Sirot
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
College of Wooster
Wooster OH USA
lsirot@wooster.edu
Evolutionary and Applied Reproductive Biology
We are broadly interested in the reproductive behavior of animals, including mechanisms that males and females use to influence reproductive success. Our current research focuses on reproductive behavior and physiology in several species including: the pomace fly (Drosophila melanogaster), the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), and humans.
Clement Kent
Senior Scientist
Janelia Research Campus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Ashburn VA USA
clementfkent@gmail.com
Heberlein Lab
Insect behavior genetics, genomics, and population genomics. Research foci in Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera.
Singo Kikuta
Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Bio-Applications & Systems Engineering (BASE)
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Koganei Tokyo Japan
singo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

I study the molecular/cellular dynamics involved in insect physiology using fluorescent proteins. My research is to understand transportation of sugars, metabolites or small molecules such as hormone. I develop genetically encoded FRET-based sensors to detect, visualize, and quantify circulating molecules in the hemolymph. And also, I am interested in the gene transfer technologies against non-model organisms to understand specialized characteristics in themselves.
Marko Petek
PhD
Department of Biotechnology and Systems Biology
National Institute of Biology
Ljubljana Osrednjeslovenska Slovenia
marko.petek@nib.si

insect RNAi, plant-insect interactions, insect digestive enzymes
Jennifer Baltzegar
NSF IGERT Fellow in Genetic Engineering and Society
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
jen_baltzegar@ncsu.edu
Gould Lab
I am broadly interested in studying the differences between populations and species via mechanisms of evolution and impacts of population change. I am particularly interested in studying the impacts genetic engineering technologies have on natural populations.
Christy Waits
Bioscience Technologist
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Jacksonville FL USA
christy.m.waits.ctr@mail.mil
Testing and Evaluation Department
Test and evaluate novel pesticides and equipment for use in disease vector control.
Megan Fritz
Post-doctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology, Program in Genetics
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
mlfritz@ncsu.edu

I am broadly interested in the evolutionary responses of insects to their constantly changing environment. Humans are an important source of this change, often imposing strong selection on insect populations through management practices. My current research explores how the genomes of Lepidopteran agricultural pests respond to selection imposed by transgenic crops.
Alexandros Belavilas-Trovas
Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
alexbelavilas@hotmail.com
Molecular biology & genomics-Mathiopoulos lab
The analysis of genes involved in the sexual behaviour of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. Our purpose is the use of these data for the improvement of the SIT approaches or other innovative pest control strategies
Kanapathy Gajapathy
Dr
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northernprovince Sri Lanka
gayan156@gmail.com
zoology laboratory; molecular biology laboratory in University of jaffna
Focusing on evolution and phylogeny of arthropods; specifically spiders and vector species among insects
Ann Tate
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TENNESSEE United States
annthomastate@gmail.com

We study the evolutionary ecology of infection and immunity in laboratory and wild insect populations. Our primary model host is Tribolium castaneum, and we combine experiments and theory to understand the effect of host-microbe interactions across biological levels of organization.
Waring Trible
Genetics
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
wtrible@rockefeller.edu
Kronauer Laboratory
Ant genetics. I am currently working on developing a CRISPR protocol in the ant Cerapachys biroi, which I will use to study genes relevant to caste differentiation and chemical communication. Past projects include population genetics of fire ants and army ants, fire ant phermone analysis, and phylogenetics of ant evolution.
Ademir Martins
PhD
CV
Laficave
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ)
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
ademirjr@ioc.fiocruz.br
Lab of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors
Insecticide resistance mechanisms in insects of medical importance
William Bart Bryant
Research Assistant Professor
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Ks usa
wbb@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel Lab
Currently my research in the Kristin Michel lab focuses on studying the interplay between fecundity and immunity in the malaria vector mosquito.
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Santosh sarathy
molecular entomology
NBAIR
Bangalore Karnataka India
santoshsarathy@gmail.com

Expression profiling for insecticide resistance
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Nitin Gupta
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences and Bioengineering
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Kanpur UP India
nitiniitk@gmail.com

I am interested in understanding the fundamental mechanisms used by neural circuits for processing information in deeper layers of the mosquito olfactory system (sense of smell). I am particularly interested in understanding the neural mechanisms by which specific odors become attractive or aversive to mosquitoes. I plan to use a variety of techniques, including in vivo electrophysiology (intracellular recordings), histology, behavioral observations, and computational modeling. I am looking to collaborate with researchers who have expertise in genetic manipulations of mosquitoes. I am also looking to hire post-docs and PhD students in my lab.
Kimberly Stephens
Entomology
University of California - Riverside
Riverside California United States
kstep002@ucr.edu

Sperm motility and sperm-egg interactions
Alicia Timm
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
aetimm@gmail.com

I investigate insect-plant interactions, focussing on plant resistance and insect response to viruses. I also research the taxonomy and population genetics of agriculturally important insects.
Gary Puterka
Research scientist
Wheat, Peanut, other crops research unit, USDA-ARS
USDA-ARS
Stillwater OK USA
gary.puterka@ars.usda.gov
USDA-ARS, Wheat, peanuts, and other crops research unit
Aphid Pest Management/genetics; Wheat, Barley, and Sorghum aphid resistant germplasm development
Konstantina Tsoumani
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
CV
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
kotsouma@bio.uth.gr
Molecular biology & Genomics - Mathiopoulos Lab
Genomic and transcriptomic analyses using NGS data, identification and functional analyses of genes involved 1) in reproductive behaviour including the olfactory and gustatory systems of the olive fruit fly, as well as 2) in embryogenesis, that can be used in the development of new genetic control strategies of the olive fly.
John Chaston
Assistant Professor
Genetics & Biotechnology
Brigham Young University
Provo UT USA
john_chaston@byu.edu

genetic basis for Drosophila-microbiota interactions
Laura Harrington
Professor
Department of Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
lch27@cornell.edu
Harrington lab
Research in the Harrington lab focuses on mosquito vector ecology, biology, and behavior. Our goal is to understand basic (and often overlooked) aspects of mosquito biology in order to identify new targets for controlling mosquitoes and reducing transmission of vector-borne diseases.
Robert Waterhouse
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
University of Geneva Medical School
Geneva Geneva Switzerland
robert.waterhouse@unige.ch
Computational Evolutionary Genomics Group
Evolutionary genomics of mosquitoes and other insects.
Geoffrey Attardo
Assistant Professor
CV
Entomology and Nematology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
gmattardo@ucdavis.edu

My research focuses upon the reproductive biology of insect vectors of human disease. My Ph.D. thesis in Dr. Alex Raikhels lab focused upon the effects of nutritional components of blood (amino acids) upon the transcriptional regulation of yolk protein genes in the Yellow Fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti). Following that I worked for 13 years, first as a Postdoc and then a Research Scientist, at Yale University with Dr. Serap Aksoy on the reproductive biology of tsetse flies. I have recently started a lab group in the Entomology and Nematology Department at the University of California, Davis. My work here is
Andrew Straw
IMP Fellow
Circuit Neuroscience
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP)
Vienna Vienna Austria
andrew.straw@imp.ac.at
Straw Lab
The questions we address are as follows. 1) What are the identity and function of neurons and molecules required for specific behaviors? This is neural circuit mapping. 2) What are individual sub-behaviors an animal uses and how do these sub-behaviors interact? We define, rigorously quantify, and model these sub-behaviors and their interactions with ideas from control theory, Bayesian inference and cognitive science. This is systems behavior. 3) We want to connect these levels of understanding into a mapping that lets us traverse from neuronal implementation to computational task and behavioral context in a rigorous way. Ultimately, we aim to link
Eveline Verhulst
PhD
CV
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Wageningen The Netherlands
e.c.verhulst@gmail.com

My main research focuses on the evolution of sex determining mechanisms in insects. From 2014 onwards, I am funded by a NWO Veni grant to determine how this one conserved gene, called doublesex, can regulate the diverse sexual morphologies found in insects. This research is hosted at the Wageningen University (WUR) in the Laboratory of Genetics group. The main ambition of my research is to compare the sex determining pathways of three parasitic wasp species: Nasonia vitripennis, Muscidifurax raptorellus and M. uniraptor.
Jason Pitts
Research Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Baylor University
Nashville Tennessee United States
jason_pitts@baylor.edu

I am interested in answering fundamental questions about the chemical ecology and sensory biology of disease vector insects. Chemoreception is a major driver of multiple insect behaviors, all of which are critical for survival and reproduction. The molecular basis for many peripheral chemoreception events is still poorly understood, although some insect chemoreceptor gene families, such as odorant receptors and variant ionotropic receptors, have been identified. My research is focused on many aspects of insect chemosensation including novel gene discovery, gene expression analysis, and receptor function. My long-term objective is to contribute to reductions in human disease transmission at the local
Valeria Petrella
PhD
CV
biology
University of Naples "Federico II"
Napoli Italy Italy
valeria.petrella@unina.it
Insects Molecular Genetics
I'm a postdoctoral researcher with a broad interest in Molecular Genetics. My main research focuses on the study of sex determining mechanisms in insects and biotech approaches to control pest insects, with particular interest on diptera (Ceratitis capitata, aedes aegypti, aedes albopictus, phlebotomus perniciosus). In 2014 I've joined the Giuseppe Saccone and Marco Salvemini group as a Post. Doc with a one-year fellowship entitled "Comparative Population Transcriptomics To Uncover Sex Determination of Aedes albopictus and Phlebotomus perniciosus, Two Emerging Haematophagous Insect Species". Then main goal of my project is the molecular charachterization and functional analysis of genes
Fillip Port
PhD
Division of Signaling and Functional Genomics
DKFZ German Cancer Research Center
Heidelberg BW Germany
fport@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk

We develop methods for CRISPR/Cas genome engineering in Drosophila melanogaster. Our tools and protocols are freely available via our website crisprflydesign.org, the plasmid repository Addgene and the Bloomington Drosophila Stock Center.
Kimberly Paczolt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
kpaczolt@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
I am studying the evolution of the meiotic drive X chromosome in stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni) from both a genetic and organismal perspective. First, I am working to identify genes involved in the meiotic drive pathway, which has arisen independently from other well known drive systems. Second, I am interested in understanding how the meiotic drive X chromosome affects the evolution of morphology and behavior in populations and species of stalk-eyed flies.
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Julia Bristow
Biological Sciences
Syngeta
Bracknell Berkshire England
Julia.Bristow@syngenta.com

Molecular Biology and Genetics
niels Wynant
PhD
Biology
Zoological Institute
Leuven Vlaams-Brabant Leuven
niels.wynant@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
Regulation of (systemic) RNA interference (RNAi) in insects
Brian Counterman
Biological Sciences
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS USA
bcounterman@biology.msstate.edu

Evolution, Population Genomics, Speciation
Hideki Sezutsu
Head
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
hsezutsu@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research lab
We are developing transgenic silkworms for fundamental research and applications. Our aims are to understand insect functions and evolution, in addition to design the insects for the creation of new insect-industries.
Takuya Tsubota
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
tsubota@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
My research is concerned with the development of silkworm transgenic technique and its application. I succeeded in identifying a novel silkworm strong and ubiquitous promoter, that is, hsp90 promoter. Using the novel techniques, I want to clarify lepidopteran-specific biological phenomena such as gene regulation in the silk gland.
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Diana Cox-Foster
Professor
Entomology
Penn State
Univ. Park PA USA
dxc12@psu.edu
Cox-Foster Lab
My Lab is interested in host/pathogen interactions. We are interested in genes associated with the immune system and cuticular exoskeleton (biosynthesis and molting). We are interested in immune responses to viruses, and responses to parasites such as nematodes and varroa mites. In particular, the anti-viral immune responses are of interest, going from point of infection to death of the insect host.
Eran Tauber
Dr
Genetics
University of Leicester
Leicester Leicestershire United Kingdom
eran.tauber@gmail.com

proximate and ultimate (evolutionary) mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms and seasonal timing.
Panagiota Koskinioti
Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
pakoskin@bio.uth.gr

My research focuses on the role of the host preference and the presence of symbionts in the genetic profile of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Mark Blaxter
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Scotland UK
mark.blaxter@ed.ac.uk
Nematode and neglected genomics
The Blaxter nematode and neglected genomics lab uses genomics approaches, based on next-gen sequencing, to assemble, annotate and interpret the genomes of target species. While our main focus is on parasitic members of the Nematoda (we are involved in projects to understand the evolutionary genomic origins of parasitism, and collaborate with a wide range of biologists developing new drugs and vaccines for human and animal diseases), we also study free-living nematodes, nematomorphs, tardigrades, onychophorans, obscure and not so obscure arthropods... and some token lophotrochozoans, such as snails and earthworms. A second research focus in on bacterial symbionts of animals, particularly
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
Philip Batterham
Professor
Genetics Dept/Bio21 Institute
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
p.batterham@unimelb.edu.au
Systems biology of the insect:insecticide interface
There are three areas of research in my lab:- 1. The biology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are targeted by insecticides including neonicotinoids and spinosyns. 2. The systems biology of neonicotinoid metabolism and transport combining genetic and metabolomic approaches. 3. Pest insect genomics. Specifically we work on the flesh fly, Lucilia cuprina, and the moth, Helicoverpa armigera. Much of our research is conducted in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster, however we do bioassay the function of pest genes expressed in this species.
Adriana Costero-Saint Denis
Vector Biology Program Officer
Div. of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Rockville Maryland USA
acostero@niaid.nih.gov

Vector biology
William Stumph
Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
San Diego State University
San Diego CA USA
wstumph@mail.sdsu.edu

My lab studies the formation of RNA polymerase II and RNA polymerase III transcription pre-initiation complexes on genes that code for the small nuclear RNAs (U1-U6). We are interested in the molecular mechanisms that determine the RNA polymerase specificity of these genes (Pol II on U1-U5 versus Pol III on U6). We particularly study the snRNA gene-specific transcription factor SNAPc that binds about 40 to 60 base pairs upstream of both classes of genes.
John Belote
Professor
Biology Department
Syracuse University
Syracuse NY USA
jbelote@syr.edu
Belote Lab
In collaboration with the Scott Pitnick lab (Syracuse University) we are studying mechanisms of post-mating sexual selection in a variety of insects, including Drosophila, Tribolium, sepsids and yellow dung flies.
John Tower
Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
University of Southern California
Los Angeles California United States
jtower@usc.edu
Tower Lab
Gene expression during aging and predictive biomarkers of life span. Sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and p53. MnSOD and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response UPRmt 3D video tracking of flies including GFP
Kostas Iatrou
Prof
Institute of Biosciences & Applications
National Centre for Scientific Research 'Demokritos"
Aghia Paraskevi (Athens) Attiki Greece
iatrou@bio.demokritos.gr
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Developmental biology of oogenesis in lepidopteran insects (Bombyx mori model) and olfaction in anopheline mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae model). Identification of insect endocrine regulators and methods for fast identification of mosquito attractants and repellents of natural origin. Molecular biology and engineering of baculoviruses (BmNPV and AcNPV models) for development as insect transduction and transformation vectors.
Mark Guillotte
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
University of Maryland Baltimore
Baltimore Maryland United States
mguil33@gmail.com

Vector-borne disease
TRANG LE THI DIEU
Dr.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
ltdtrang@hcmuaf.edu.vn
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Gianluca Tettamanti
Associate Professor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
University of Insubria
Varese --- Italy
gianluca.tettamanti@uninsubria.it
Laboratory of Invertebrate Biology
- Cell death and regeneration in insect development - Insect biotechnology - Immune response in insects
Anna-Maria Botha
Professor PhD
Genetics
Stellenbosch University
Stellenbosch Western Cape South Africa
ambo@sun.ac.za
Cereal Genomics
The Genomics research group at Stellenbosch, headed by Prof. Anna-Maria Botha-Oberholster aims to be at the forefront of research on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) resistance to Diuraphis noxia (Kurdj., Hemiptera, Aphididae), although other important plant stressors are also under investigation. Our research is hypothesis driven and fundamental in nature, but aims to address current problems relevant to the agricultural community. Research focus Russian wheat aphid resistance Research in the Cereal Genome programme focuses on the elucidation of the underlying genetic mechanisms involved in host-pest interactions by making use of genomic tools. Understanding defence mechanisms in the wheat host and how
Yoshiaki Tanaka
Senior Researcher
Insect Gene Function Research Unit
National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
yoshiaki@affrc.go.jp
Insect Gene Function Research Unit
Neuropeptide and GPCR
Graham Thompson
Associate Professor
Biology
Western University
London Ontario Canada
graham.thompson@uwo.ca
The Social Biology Group
My lab studies the biological basis of insect social behaviour; how it evolves, how it is maintained and why some species are social while others are not. Much like human societies, eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites show bewildering complexity in how their societies are structured. Yet for insects, this complexity is derived from an economically simple division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive specialists. Studying reproductive division of labour in insects at the level of the gene can provide key insights into how complex social systems evolved from simpler, ancestral ones. Studies on social insects can also help understand
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
anjiang tan
Dr.
Key Laboratory of Insect Developmental and Evolutionary Biology
Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Shanghai Shanghai China
ajtan01@sibs.ac.cn

Insect transgene, genome editing
Umut Toprak
Associate Professor
CV
Plant Protection/Entomology
Ankara University
Ankara Ankara Turkey
utoprak@agri.ankara.edu.tr
Molecular Entomology (MOLEN) Lab.
My primary research goals are directed towards understanding insect physiological systems using molecular tools and developing new insect control strategies targeting these systems. My current research is focused on: 1) Identification of insect midgut genes and understanding their functions, specifically in lepidopterans and coleopterans 2) Understanding insect lipid metabolism, particularly related to diapause 3) Development of baculoviral biopesticides and their formulation by synergistics targeting insect midgut defense physiology and function
Patricia Wittkopp
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan USA
wittkopp@umich.edu
Wittkopp lab
Our research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution. The evolution of development, especially mechanisms controlling gene regulation, are of particular interest. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work.
Tatiana Torres
Assistant Professor
Genetics and Evolutionary Biology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo SP Brazil
tttorres@ib.usp.br
Genomics and Evolution of Arthropods
Our research focuses on the investigation of patterns of variability observed in genes and genomes, particularly regulatory variation, and understanding the underlying evolutionary processes involved in the emergence of these patterns. To pursue this we use insects and other arthropods as model organisms.
Cynthia Staber
Sr. Laboratory Manager
Zeitlinger Lab
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Kansas City MO USA
cst@stowers.org
Zeitlinger Lab
I have worked on Segregation Distorter for many years and now work on regulation of developmental timing in the Drosophila embryo.
Mark Rheault
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of British Columbia
Kelowna British Columbia Canada
mark.rheault@ubc.ca
Rheault Lab
Our lab strives to understand how transporting epithelia of insects such as the, salivary glands, midgut, Malpighian tubules, hindgut and anal papillae of various insects play a role in the ionoregulation, osmoregulation, and the excretion of potentially toxic endogeneous or exogenous compounds. In order to elucidate mechanisms responsible for these phenomena our lab uses an integrative approach which includes gene level to to whole organism studies.
Christopher Potter
Assistant Professor
Department of Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore MD USA
cpotter@jhmi.edu
Potter Lab
We are interested in the neural mechanisms underlying insect olfaction. We have initially focused on Drosophila melanogaster, and will extend our research into Anopheles gambiae.
Steve Stowers
Assistant professor
Cell Biology and Neuroscience
Montana State University
Bozeman Montana United States
sstowers@montana.edu

How sensory information is processed by the nervous system to produce behavioral outputs is a long-standing problem in neuroscience, but one far from being understood. My lab exploits the many advantages of the Drosophila model system to study the relationship between somatosensory input and behavior. Our overall strategy is to first map neural circuits associated with specific somatosensory neurons and then manipulate and measure neuronal activity within the circuit to elucidate the fundamental principles of neuronal circuit logic. Since the depth with which a neural circuit will be understood will correlate with the precision with which it can be manipulated, we
Nicholas Teets
Assistant Professor
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY USA
n.teets@uky.edu

My research centers on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which insects survive extreme environmental conditions. Specifically I am interested in the signaling mechanisms governing rapid responses to cold and other environmental stress, and how these pathways can be manipulated for pest control. I use an integrative approach to study these questions from multiple levels of biological organization, using cell biology, functional genomics, and transgenic methods to study these pathways in both model and non-model species.
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Subhash Lakhotia
Professor
Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology
Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi UP India
lakhotia@bhu.ac.in

Major current research interests using Drosophila as the model organism: cell stress related gene expression in development, long non-coding RNAs, stress proteins in tumour development, neurodegenerative disorders, Ayurvedic Biology
LALITA GUPTA
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Birla Institute of Technology & Science- Pilani
Pilani Rajasthan INDIA
lalitagupta@yahoo.com
Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology and Vector Biology
Mosquito Immunity. Host-Parasite Interaction
Gareth Lycett
Vector
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside UK
gareth.lycett@lstmed.ac.uk
Lycett Group
I am a vector molecular biologist whose main interests are focused on functional genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae. The topics explored include cellular and molecular analysis of mosquito/plasmodium interactions, developing tools for conditional expression in transgenic Anophelines, regulation of gene expression in mosquito tissues, and functional genetic analysis of insecticide resistance.
Dimitrios Kontogiannatos
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology Department
Agricultural University of Athens
Athens Attika Greece
dim_kontogiannatos@yahoo.gr

I am studying the use of RNAi technology in several aspects of Insect Science, like functional genomics, endocrinology and pest management (Baculovirus, bacterial-mediated dsRNA delivery and direct transfer of dsRNAs) in the Lepidopteran species Sesamia nonagrioides.  I am also working with insect cell lines and baculovirus technology in order to express and biochemically characterize important developmental genes of several insect pests. 
Thomas Flatt
SNF Professor
CV
Department of Ecology and Evolution
University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Lausanne Vaud Switzerland
thomas.flatt@unil.ch
Evolution and Mechanisms of Life History
I study the evolution and mechanisms of life history and aging, mostly by applying population and functional genomics approaches (next-generation sequencing, population genomics) to natural (e.g., clinal) and laboratory (e.g., artificial selection and experimental evolution) populations of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) which are phenotypically differentiated for life history. I am particulary interested in using genomic approaches to identify candidate genes and alleles likely shaped by selection and then to test these candidates for effects upon life history by using functional genetics (e.g., RNAi, synthetic recombinant populations, and gene editing methods such as CRISPR/Cas-9). Currently, we are applying this toolbox
Thierry Brévault
Dr
Entomology
CIRAD
Dakar Dakar Senegal
brevault@cirad.fr

Entomology and Ecology
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Peter Armbruster
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC USA
paa9@georgetown.edu
Armbruster
Research in my lab is focused on understanding processes of phenotypic evolution in natural populations and the molecular bases of adaptation. Our approach to these questions is integrative. We perform a wide range of studies, including field ecology, quantitative and population genetics, and molecular physiology. We are currently studying the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus, a vector of both dengue fever and Chikungunya virus. Our research intersects with a variety of topics in both invasive species biology and medical entomology, and we are particularly interested in novel approaches that lie at the interface of these
Brenda Oppert
Research Molecular Biologist
CV
Stored Products Insects Research Unit
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
Manhattan KS USA
bso@ksu.edu
BeetleLab
Although my background is protein chemistry, in 2007 our lab research focus shifted to high throughput sequencing to address functional genomics related to stored product insects. We now use sequencing in the evaluation of differential gene expression in insects fed microbial toxins or protease inhibitors, among others. We also were involved in the annotation of the Tribolium genome, particularly protease genes, and now are working with collaborators to sequence the genome of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica. To evaluate data from these sequencing projects, we have developed data management infrastructure and analysis algorithms for in-house bioinformatics.
Lucy Firth
Dr
Invertebrate Genetics
Syngenta
Bracknell Berkshire UK
lucy.firth@syngenta.com
Dr. Lucy C. Firth
Drosophila genetic technologies to uncover and understand insecticidal mode of action targets and resistance. Comparative genomics of agronomic pest species.
Denis Tagu
Senior Scientist
IGEPP
INRA Rennes
BP 35327 Le Rheu Bretagne FRANCE
denis.tagu@rennes.inra.fr
Institute of Genetics, Environment and Plant Protection
Genomics, arthropods, bioinformatics, gene network, phenotypic plasticity
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Aline Edith Noutcha
Dr- Senior Lecturer
CV
Entomology & Pest Management Unit, Department of Animal & Environmental Biology
University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria
naemekeu@yahoo.com
Entomology & Pest Management Research Lab
Understanding Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases eg: Malaria, Filariases (Epidemiology, Immunology, Parasitology, Genomics, Entomology, Cytogenetics, Cell Biology) Prevention & Control of Vector Borne Infectious Diseases (Community Education on Basic Control Practices and Healthy Life Styles, Good Environmental Practices; Inventory of Cultural Control Methods among various communities; Determination of factors affecting compliance of imported/prescribed control approaches). Monitoring Resistance phenomena in Insect & Parasites.
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes
Associate Professor
Entomology and Plant Pathology
University of Tennessee
Knoxville TN USA
jurat@utk.edu

Our research is focused on the physiology of the insect gut, particularly the molecular characterization of interactions between the gut epithelium and insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the identification of novel enzymes for biofuel production, and the characterization of the gut regenerative response after pathogenic attack.
Zhijian Tu
Professor
Biochemistry
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg Virginia United States
jaketu@vt.edu
Mosquito Genetics and Genomics
Mosquito transmitted diseases, such as malaria, dengue fever, and encephalitis claim millions of lives worldwide each year. Current control measures are under threat as drug- and insecticide-resistance increases. Novel approaches are needed and needed urgently. My laboratory studies the basic genetics and physiology of mosquitoes with the long-term goal of reducing the burden of vector-borne infectious diseases. My laboratory employs functional genomics, comparative genomics, and bioinformatics approaches to study genes involved in sex-determination and early embryonic development in mosquitoes. The above research topics will lead to mosquito control applications through the manipulation of sex ratios and mating behavior. A better understanding
Shirley Luckhart
Professor
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
UC Davis
Davis CA United States
sluckhart@ucdavis.edu

General areas of research in the laboratory include: the molecular cell biology and biochemistry of malaria parasite transmission, the functional characterization of the immunological crosstalk and cell signaling that occurs between the mosquito and the mammalian host during bloodfeeding, and the impact of endemic co-infections on malaria parasite development and transmission. Specific research projects include: the conserved signal transduction pathways involved in anti-parasite host innate immunity; systems biology and function of immune factors and cell signaling pathways that are activated between mosquitoes and their mammalian hosts at the interface of bloodfeeding; identification and functional analyses of naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms
Michael Kanost
Distinguished Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kanost@ksu.edu
Kanost lab
My laboratory is investigating proteins present in the hemolymph (blood) of insects, with special interest in the proteins' functions in the insect immune system. We are studying plasma proteins, including prophenoloxidase, serine proteases, protease inhibitors from the serpin superfamily, and proteins that bind to microbial polysaccharides. The long range goal is to understand the biochemical and cellular processes by which insect immune systems recognize and respond to pathogens and parasites. We also investigate the biochemistry of cuticle proteins and their roles in determining mechanical properties of insect exoskeletons. A third current research area is the biochemistry of multicopper oxidases in
Paul Eggleston
Prof.
Life Sciences
Keele University
Keele Staffs. UK
p.eggleston@keele.ac.uk
Molecular Entomology
My research interests are in molecular entomology, particularly the molecular genetics of mosquitoes that transmit human disease and their complex interactions with the parasites and viruses that cause disease. Because of their medical importance, the focus of my group is on the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Current projects include the development of technologies for genetic engineering of mosquitoes, the creation of genetically modified mosquitoes that are compromised in their ability to transmit disease and the development of strategies for stage- and tissue-specific gene expression within genetically modified mosquitoes. My research has attracted
Cassandra Extavour
Associate Professor
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA United States
extavour@oeb.harvard.edu
Extavour Lab
My lab is interested in the evolution of early embryonic development. We focus primarily on the evolution and development of reproductive systems, including both the germ line and the somatic components of the gonad. We use molecular genetic developmental analysis, histological analysis, and experimental embryology to study early animal embryogenesis, germ cell specification, and gonad development in several different invertebrate model systems. Our main goal is to understand the evolution of the genetic mechanisms that enabled the evolution of multicellularity, and how these mechanisms employed during early embryogenesis in extant organisms to specify cell fate, development and differentiation.
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Christina Schulte
CV
Heinrich-Heine University
Evolutionary Genetics
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
christina-schulte@gmx.de

Honeybee workers show altruistic behaviors in contrast to queens and drones, which show behaviors that are related to reproduction. The collective behaviors of the worker bees produce group phenotypes that allow them to remain well-adapted in a changing environment. These worker specific behaviors have been largely described but we have little understanding of the molecular control that specifies these behaviors in the brain during development, and of its evolution that gave rise to social behaviors during the last 60 million years. Differentiation of the worker brain is specified by female- and caste-determining signals. The sex-determining signal is implemented by Feminizer protein
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Cathy Coutu
Molecular Biology Technician
Research Branch
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Saskatoon SK Canada
cathy.coutu@agr.gc.ca
Hegedus Lab
•Insect genomics and proteomics platforms leading to the identification of novel targets and strategies for insect resistance. The focus is on insect digestive biochemistry.
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Wayne Hunter
Research Entomologist
Subtropical Insects Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Fort Pierce Florida USA
wayne.hunter@ars.usda.gov
U.S. Horticultural Research Lab
RNAi to manage hemipteran pests, Psyllid & Leafhopper Genomics. Viral pathogens, cell culture.
Brian Lovett
Graduate Student
Entomology Department
University of Maryland
College Park MD United States
lovettbr@umd.edu
St. Leger Lab
Brian Lovett is a PhD student studying mycology and genetics in agricultural and vector biology systems. He is currently working on projects analyzing mycorrhizal interactions in agricultural systems and the transcriptomics of malaria vector mosquitoes.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Darko Cotoras
PhD Candidate
CV
Integrative Biology
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley California USA
darkocotoras@berkeley.edu
Evolution of terrestrial invertebrates on islands
I am interested on historical processes that create biodiversity, particularly in conditions of isolation. I am studying the temporal dynamic of the adaptive radiation of the Tetragnatha spiders in the Hawaiian archipelago. For that, I am using population genetics and phylogenetics approaches (Exon Capture -NGS- and Sanger sequencing) using fresh and museum samples. As a complement, I am also studying the color polymorphism of several species and their habitat (plant) preferences. In parallel, I am doing phylogenetic studies on endemic spiders from the Juan Fernández archipelago and characterizing the spider community of Rapa
Kevin Temeyer
Research Molecular Biologist
CV
Agricultural Research Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Kerrville Texas USA
kevin.temeyer@ars.usda.gov
Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory
Incumbent is a Research Molecular Biologist in the Livestock Insects Research Unit of the Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory, Kerrville, Texas. The research is a component of ARS National Program 104 – Veterinary, Medical and Urban Entomology. Incumbent is Lead Scientist for the Biting Fly CRIS Project with objectives to 1) develop new attractants, repellents, and behavior modifying chemicals based on physiology of chemical reception; 2) evaluate efficacy of novel technologies for control of flies; and 3) determine interactions between flies and microorganisms that affect survival of the insects and their capability to transmit pathogens. Incumbent is Lead Scientist
Dominic Esposito
Director
Protein Expression Laboratory
Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research
Frederick MD USA
dom.esposito@fnlcr.nih.gov
Protein Expression Laboratory
Generation of recombinant DNA and proteins in support of the National Cancer Institute's RAS initiative.
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
Amy Toth
Assistant Professor
Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University
Ames Iowa United States
amytoth@iastate.edu
Assistant Professor
We use an integrative approach, blending behavior, ecology, physiology, and genomics, to discover new insights into the mechanisms and evolution of social behavior. We are also investigating the roles of nutrition, viruses, and landscapes on pollinator health and conservation. Our main study systems are honey bees (Apis mellifera) and paper wasps (genus Polistes).
J. Spencer Johnston
Professor
Entomology/Genetics
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
spencerj@tamu.edu
We estimate do Genome Size Estimates for genomics projects
My primary interest is in genome size evolution and genome architecture. The Alab specializes in Arthropod genome size estimates, but routinely determinse genome size for a wide variety of organisms. We take pride in estimates that are timely, accurate and precise, and follow these estimates through to final publication of completed genomes, phylogenomic and genomic surveys. We also study population structure, working primarily on honey bees. These studies include microsatellite loci, SNPs, genomic and quantitative cytogenetics.
Josephine Reinhardt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Biology
University of Maryland College Park
College Park MD USA
reinharj@umd.edu
http://igtrcn.org/participant/gerald-wilkinson/
I am currently studying several aspects of the genomics of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), which are best known as a model for sexual selection and meiotic drive. Recently, it was also discovered the T. dalmanni have a sex chromosome distinct from both the ancestral X and the X in Drosophila, making them an interesting comparative model for aspects of sex-chromosome evolution. We recently released a transcriptome assembly as part of an analysis that identified genes that are differentially regulated in males carrying a driving sex chromosome. We are currently assembling and annotating the T. dalmanni genome.
Joe O’Tousa
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
jotousa@nd.edu
O'Tousa Lab
My research focuses on the study of invertebrate visual systems. The Drosophila system has provided excellent molecular and genetic tools for this analysis. More recently we extended our studies to mosquito visual systems, specifically looking at mosquito retinal structure and the photoreceptor adaptations enabling vision and mosquito behaviors in low light environments.
Steve Paterson
Professor
CV
Centre for Genomic Research
University of Liverpool
Liverpool Merseyside UK
s.paterson@liv.ac.uk
Centre for Genomic Research
Genomics and population genetics, particularly of host-parasite interactions. Bioinformatics, including RNAseq, de novo assembly and annotation. Sequenced Plodia interpunctella genome.
Mr. Shreeharsha Tarikere
Biology
IISER Pune
pune maharashtra india
harsha_tts1@yahoo.co.uk

Wing development in insects with focus on lepidoptera
Shin Goto
Associate Professor
Graduate School of Science
Osaka City University
Osaka Osaka Japan
shingoto@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp

Molecular mechanisms of Insect environmental adaptation.
Peter Atkinson
Professor
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
peter.atkinson@ucr.edu
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
Arnaud Martin
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California Berkley
BERKELEY CA USA
heliconiuswing@gmail.com
Evolution and Development of butterflies and moths
I am a developmental biologist who specializes in evolutionary studies of the genotype-phenotype map, in particular in non-model organisms of ecological interest. I am particularly interested in the generative mechanisms of evolutionary change and use a combination of comparative, genomic and developmental tools in lepidopterans to tackle how the genetic properties of living systems generate variation and biodiversity.
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
Jeffrey Scott
Professor
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
jgs5@cornell.edu

Evolution and Population Genetics of Insecticide Resistance, Insecticide Toxicology, P450 Monooxygenases of Insects, Insect Molecular Biology, Evolution of Sex Determination in Musca domestica, RNAi applications for pest control
Kristina Pilitt
technician
O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland, College Park
Rockville MD USA
gene_queen76@hotmail.com
Faculty Research Assistant
Molecular genetic studies using piggBac transposon-based gene-, enhancer-, promoter-trapping system transformation vectors for creating transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Genotype analysis and characterization of transgenic mosquito lines using molecular techniques such as splinkerette PCR, inverse PCR and gene expression studies using quantitative RT-PCR.
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Jamie Walters
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
jrwalters@ku.edu
James R. Walters Profile
The adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Dr. Jeffrey Stuart
Professor, Insect Molecular Genetics
faculty
Department of Entomology
Purdue University
West Lafayette IN United States
stuartjj@purdue.edu
Stuart Lab
Dr. Stuart's research is largely focused on the molecular genetics of plant-insect interactions. Currently, it is centered on understanding the mechanisms that allow plant-galling arthropods to create galls on plants and testing the hypothesis that arthropod-produced effector proteins have evolved to create the extended phenotypes we call plant galls. Toward that goal, we have been improving the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), one of the most economically important gall midges, as a genetically tractable experimental organism for studies of plant-insect interactions and arthropod-induced plant-gall formation. Recent efforts have sequenced and assembled the HF genome and ordered approximately 60% of the
David O’Brochta
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology; Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland
dobrocht@umd.edu
Rockville MD United States
dobrocht@umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
Our research focuses on insect molecular genetics with particular interest in the study of insects that transmit human diseases although our interests are very broad. Our interests in genetics center around the study of transposable elements.  Those interests range from questions concerning their basic biology and aspects of their movement to more applied question concerning their development and use as genome manipulation tools.  Our insect interests are centered mainly on mosquitoes and the physiological genetics of Plasmodium infection. 
Dr. Max Scott
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
max_scott@ncsu.edu
Scott Lab
Our main interest is in developing transgenic “male-only” strains of insect pests for genetic control programs. For example, we have developed strains of flies that are pests of livestock (e.g. New World screwworm), which carry genetic systems that cause female lethality unless tetracycline is added to the diet. We are also interested in developing genetic systems for replacing mosquito populations with strains that have a reduced capacity to transmit diseases such as dengue fever. Our applied work is underpinned by fundamental research on the regulation of gene expression in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. For example, we have investigated how