Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
saptarshi ghosh
Department of Entomology
Volcani Center, Agriculture research organisation, Israel
Rishon Lezion Rishon Lezion Israel
sunnysaptarshi@gmail.com

Insect-vector interactions
Michael Smanski
Assistant Professor
Department of Biochem, Mol Biol, and Biophys and the Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St Paul MN USA
smanski@umn.edu

Our group has developed novel strategies to control gene flow between engineered and wild populations.
Maciej Maselko
Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St. Paul MN USA
mmaselko@umn.edu

I am developing Synthetic Incompatibility; an approach for engineering species-like barriers in sexually reproductive organisms. Synthetic Incompatibility has applications for transgene biocontainment in plants engineered to produce high-value compounds and for controlling pest species such as mosquitoes and invasive fish.
Isabella Schember
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
ilschemb@buffalo.edu
Halfon Lab, PhD candidate
I am currently a PhD candidate and I am interested in studying gene regulatory network evolution and regulatory genomics of various insects.
Maria Soto-Aguilar
Project Scientist
Department of Plant Pathology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
msotoaguilar@ucdavis.edu

plant-pathogen-vector interaction
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
Kaylen Brzezinski
Department of Biology
Carleton University
Ottawa Ontario Canada
kaylenbrzezinski@cmail.carleton.ca
MacMillan Lab
My research focuses on how temperature (mainly cold stress) affects paracellular barrier permeability in gut epithelia.
Anna Crist
Genomes and Genetics
Institut Pasteur
Paris Ile de france France
anna-beth.crist@pasteur.fr

Genetic modification of mosquitoes and nematodes
Andrew Guinness
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
aguinnes@nd.edu

Broadly, I am interested in molecular signalling and transgenic targets in insect vectors, most specifically applied to mosquitoes.
David Arnosti
Professor
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Michigan State University
East Lansing MI USA
arnosti@msu.edu

Our research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in the context of Drosophila development. We utilize genetic and molecular biological approaches to study the role of enhancers in regulation of signaling and patterning circuits, including insulin signaling, retinoblastoma-mediated control of growth related genes, and chromatin-modulating complexes important for development. Evolutionary perspectives lead us to consider how these processes are active in non-model insects, as well as vertebrates.
Oliver Siehler
Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
oliver.siehler@gmx.de

Social and Neuroanatomical aspects of social entrainment
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Dylan Shropshire
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN United States
dylan.shropshire@vanderbilt.edu

Endosymbiont genetics
Rocio Elisa Yanes Ruano
CV
MOSCAMED
Guatemala Department of Agriculture
San Miguel Petapa Guatemala Guatemala
reyr66@gmail.com
San miguel Petapa Facilities
Anastrepha Ludens Ceratitis Capitata
Jennina Taylor-Wells
Research Scientist
Research and Development
Oxitec Ltd
Abingdon Oxfordshire England, United Kingdom
jennina.taylor-wells@oxitec.com
Oxitec Ltd
My research focus encompasses the design and creation of transgenic mosquitoes for novel vector control strategies. I am interested in novel molecular biology developments for the improved design of plasmids for insect transformation, research developments in transformation efficiency and new technologies relating to insect mass rearing.
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Antonis Giakountis
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larisa Larisa Greece
agiakountis@uth.gr
Molecular Biology and Genomics
long non-coding RNAs, chromatin architecture, epigenomics, transcriptional regulation, development
Andrew Nuss
Assistant Professor
Agriculture, Nutrition, and Veterinary Science
University of Nevada Reno
Reno Nevada United States of America
nuss@cabnr.unr.edu
Nuss Lab
My research interests mainly are focused on the physiology of neurohormonal signaling in insects of agricultural, medical, and veterinary importance. I am particularly interested in peptide hormones of the gut and their role in insect behavior, digestion, and nutrient storage. Projects include insecticide discovery by targeting peptide receptors and physiological functions of peptide hormones produced in the insect gut and nervous system. I am also interested in mosquito olfaction and the factors that allow certain species to discriminate between feeding on humans and other animals.
Thanga Suja Srinivasan
Dr.
CV
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Sathyabama University, India
Chennai Tamil Nadu India
sujasree07@gmail.com
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Thanga Suja Srinivasan Researcher Plant Molecular Biology lab Sathyabama University, Chennai 06/July/2017 Research area: My research focuses on rice- planthopper interaction mechanism. Numerous resistant genes and QTL`s have been identified in rice for planthopper management. However the plant- and leafhoppers are able to adapt to the resistant genes within a few years of deployment and the exact mechanism of hopper adaptation to resistant genes is still not well known. The primary objective of the lab is to study the mechanism of hopper resistance and to develop strategies for a durable, broad spectrum and eco-friendly pest management approach. For achieving the primary goal both plant induced response
Sheina Sim
Research Biologist
CV
Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research
USDA-ARS
Hilo HI USA
ssim8@hawaii.edu

Integrating of genetic, genomic, and genome editing techniques to improve methods for tephritid fruit fly invasion pathway analysis, control, and eradication.
brian weiss
Research Scientist/Scholar and Lecturer
Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Public Health
New Haven CT USA
brian.weiss@yale.edu

My research focuses on deciphering the interactions between arthropod disease vectors and the microorganisms they house. Specifically, I work with the tsetse flies, which vector African trypanosomes. These parasites are the causative agents of human and animal African trypanosomiases in sub-saharan Africa. Tsetse also harbor a community of symbiotic (maternally transmitted) and transient (environmentally acquired) bacteria that modulate many aspects of their host's physiology. I am interested in learning how tsetse's microbiota 1) regulates the development and function of the fly's immune system, and 2) can be harnessed to reduce the fly's ability to transmit trypanosomes.
OLUSOLA SOKEFUN
Dr
Genetics / Bioinformatics
Lagos State University, Faculty of Science, Ojo
Lagos Lagos Nigeria
osokefun@gmail.com
Genetics / Bioinformatics Lab
Phylogeny, Barcoding, Population Genetics
Michael O. Kusimo
Dr.
CV
Independent researcher
IITA, Benin Station
Ifako-Ogba Lagos Nigeria
gkusimo@gmail.com

1. Molecular detoxification mechanisms in insect vectors and development of new reagents to overcome insecticide resistance 2. Assessment of new model organisms 3. Mapping of the distribution of mosquito-borne pathogens 4. Chromosomal gene screening and testing 5. Directed evolution of genes 6. Understanding the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial resistance genes 7. Development of amber temperature stable enzymes
Kristal Watrous
Assistant Specialist
CV
Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA USA
kristal.watrous@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
I am working at the interface of pollination biology and molecular research. I study the behavior and biology of solitary and social bees native to North America, and how nutritional availability and diversity affects their physiology, gene expression, and measures of survival. I am working on laboratory rearing techniques for bumble bee species in order to bring ecological and natural history questions into the lab for experimental manipulation.
Pratibha Srivastava
Biological Scientist IV
CV
Division of Plant Industry
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Gainesville Florida USA
pratibha.srivastava@freshfromflorida.com

Our goal is to increase identification capacity and strengthen detection technology, for pests of regulatory significance. Our objective is to improve all aspects of early detection technologies and resources and to develop or improve detection tests and identification capacity for species in a wide range of taxonomic groups containing high priority pests.
Ibrahim Elsheshney
Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Economic Entomology
Plant Protection (Economic Entomology)
Tanta University, Egypt
Tanta Gharbeya Egypt
ishento@yahoo.com

• Investigating innovative methods of insect pest control such as CRISPR, RNAi, Bt … etc. • Studying insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry in -omics levels. • Exploring insect resistance, immunological and development. • Understanding Ecological and multi-trophic interactions (plant-pathogen-insect-symbionts-natural enemies) in the ecosystem and microbial Ecology of insects. • IPM and Biological control of Horticulture and vegetable Insect Pests • Nanotechnology applications in pest control
Erin Scully
Research Molecular Biologist
USDA-ARS
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit
Manhattan Kansas United States
Erin.Scully@ars.usda.gov

My research focuses on the functional genomics of sensory systems of stored product insects.
Iliya Ndams
Prof.
Department of Zoology
Ahmadu Bello University Zaria
Zaria Kaduna State Nigeria
isndams@abu.edu.ng
Parasitology/Entomology Research Laboratory
Ecology and control of mosquitoes, tseste fly, blackfly, sandfly
Samuel Arsenault
Mr.
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States of America
sva@uga.edu
Brendan G. Hunt: Evolutionary Insect Genetics Lab
My research focusses on understanding the genetic and epigenetic underpinnings of social polymorphism in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. We seek to understand which genetic and behavioral cues maintain the colony structures of these organisms in their North American range. Additionally, we implement a phylogenetics-based approach for understanding the evolution of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in Hymenoptera.
Abhijit Ghosal
Dr.
Plant Protection
Sasya Shyamala Farm Science Centre
SOUTH 24 PARGANAS WEST BENGAL India
ghosalabhijit87@gmail.com

Agricultural Entomology Insect Biotechnology
MUJEEB OLUSHOLA SHITTU
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Michigan Technological University
HOUGHTON Michigan United States
mshittu@mtu.edu
Werner's Lab
Studying the evolution and development of complex colour patterns in Drosophila guttifera
Daniel Hasegawa
Research Molecular Biologist
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
Charleston SC USA
daniel.k.hasegawa@gmail.com

I am broadly interested in understanding the molecular and physiological processes that drive insect-virus relationships. I have joined the IGTRCN because I am interested in utilizing gene editing technologies to: 1) further understand insect-virus relationships that have agricultural importance; 2) develop translational tools for more effective and precise insect pest management practices.
Sanjay Basu
CV
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
sanjay.basu@pirbright.ac.uk

Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, transgenesis, gene-editing, gene drive, refractory transgenes, site-specific integration, RMCE, transposons, HDR/NHEJ, virology, underdominance, molecular biology
Flávia Virginio Fonseca
Biologist, PhD. candidate
CV
Paarasitology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo Sao Paulo Brazil
fvfonsecaa@gmail.com

Scientific Dissemination, Scientific Diffusion, Science Popularization, Community Engagement, Public Engagement.
G Sharath Chandra
PDF
CV
Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
sharathgsc@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
RNA interference (RNAi) mediated management of Insect pests; Development of Transgenic plants for pest resistance, drought tolerance; Nutritional quality improvement.
Pinky Kain Sharma
Principal investigator (Wellcome Trust DBT intermediate Fellow)
Department of Genetics and Neurobiology
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, India
Faridabad Haryana India
pinkykain@gmail.com
Laboratory of Genetics and Neurobiology
For any animal, learning about food is an important mechanism that provide animals flexibility in food choices for better survival, hence, it is extremely important to understand how the taste information is represented in the brain.I am interested in understanding how insects make the feeding decisions. This involves identifying neuronal taste circuits in the brain downstream of gustatory sensory neurons that influence feeding behaviors. Physiological state and other factors can act on the gustatory cells and circuits and can modulate taste signals, but these are not well understood in insects. Using Drosophila melanogaster, I will explore into these mechanisms for greater understanding
W. Cameron Jasper
PhD Candidate
Entomology and Nematology
UC Davis
Davis CA USA
wcjasper@ucdavis.edu
El Nino Bee Lab
My research focuses on the specialized "social" glands of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) and how the regulation of gene expression within those glands underlies the bee's social organization.
Arvind Sharma
Post-Doctoral Associate
CV
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
reno NEVADA US
arvindsharma.phd@gmail.com

My research is focused on understanding questions related to vector ecology and use of the novel techniques to modify the genome of Ixodes scapularis
Monika Gulia-Nuss
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
RENO Nevada USA
mgulianuss@unr.edu
Vector Biology Lab
My research program investigates the fundamental questions related to vector biology and vector-parasite interactions. I am particularly interested in aspects of reproductive physiology, nutrient allocation, vector competence, and population genomics.
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Rakesh Joshi
Assistant Professor
CV
Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology
Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
rakeshjoshi687@gmail.com
Insect Biology Lab
Our group mainly deals with exploring new targets in agricultural pest and developing their blockers, which can be further applied for crop protection.
Cheolho Sim
Associate Professor
Biology
Baylor University
Waco Texas United States
cheolho_sim@baylor.edu
Vector Biology
Currently, the Sim’s lab focuses on Vector Biology using a combination of genetic, molecular, cell biological and bioinformatical approaches. The two broad areas of work in our laboratory are (1) functional genomics studies of arthropod vectors of human pathogens and (2) diapause research on the mosquito Culex pipiens, which is the primary vector for West Nile encephalitis, Eastern equine encephalitis, and many arboviruses, as well as lymphatic filariases. Within the temperate zones, mosquitoes are limited temporally to just a few months of active development. The remaining months are spent in a dormancy period known as diapause. Depending on the species, mosquito
sanket deshmukh
AGROCHEMICAL AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY
nagpur maharstra india
sssanketdeshmukh@gmail.com

insilico study for pest managment
Glady Samuel
Entomology
Texas A&M
College Station TX USA
hsamuel@tamu.edu

Vector Borne diseases, Vector Viral Interactions, Mosquito Antiviral pathways
kanakala surapathrudu
post doctoral Research fellow
Department of Entomology
Agricultural Research Organization
Bet Dagan, Israel. Israel Israel
kanakalavit@gmail.com

RNAi
Yoshinori Tomoyasu
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
Miami University
Oxford OH USA
tomoyay@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu lab
My research interests revolve around understanding the molecular basis underlying morphological evolution. We use insect wings as a model, and investigate the emergence and divergence of this evolutionary critical structure, that has made insects one of the most successful group of animals on this planet. We also study the systemic aspect of RNA interference (RNAi) in insects. RNAi, in which dsRNA suppresses the translation of homologous mRNA, is a highly conserved cellular defense mechanism. In some organisms, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically from cell to cell, a phenomenon termed ‘systemic RNAi’. Understanding systemic RNAi will be crucial for the
S Sundar
Dr.
Protect Our Environment Trust
Non-Governmental Organisation
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
sun76dar@yahoo.co.in

Aquatic insects in various aspects include taxonomy, systematics, ecological, biological etc. My research interests is not confined into the aspects I have worked so far it extends to focus on aquatic insects genome studies which will provide enormous insights into insect biology.Besides, investigations on aquatic insects models can provide biological insights relevant to other organisms and it would lead to important discoveries like other aquatic organisms or invertebrates in many areas of research such as immunology, neurobiology and behaviour. Using insects as models will offer many advantages, including their short life cycle, simple anatomy and cost-effectiveness due to the ease
Ronny Rosner
Institute of Neuroscience
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne England,  United Kingdom
ronny.rosner@ncl.ac.uk

I am neurophysiologist and am working on stereoscopic vision in the praying mantis.
Jacob Stewart
Molecular Biology
University of Idaho
Moscow Id United States
jakestew@mail.com
Jake Stewart
Mating compatibility systems in Basidiomycetes, yeast genetics, plant transformation, gene drive systems, selfish elements/transposons, vector insect genetics and transformation.
Ma.Anita Bautista
Dr.
CV
Functional Genomics Laboratory
National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Quezon City National Capital Region Philippines
mambautista69@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
I currently handle research projects involving transcriptome and genome analyses of termites and selected insect pests of coconut and rice, an insect parasitoid, stingless bees, plant pathogens, and Philippine coconut varieties.
Thais Rodrigues
PhD
CV
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
thaisbarros.bio@gmail.com

RNAi technology applied to pest management
Allison Hansen
Department of Entomology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois United States
akh@illinois.edu
Hansen Lab
The main focus of my research laboratory is to investigate host-symbiont interactions between sap-sucking insects (e.g., psyllids, whiteflies, scale insects) and their ancient obligate bacterial symbionts, because of their highly co-evolved and shared amino acid metabolisms. Due to genome-enabled sequencing technology, the regulation of this co-evolved amino-acid symbiosis is an emerging area of research in these unculturable microbe-insect systems.
Kadri Oras
Department of Genetics
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire United Kingdom
kadri.oras92@gmail.com
Fly facility
I do microinjections into fruit fly embryos, mainly Drosophila Melanogaster. This includes P-element insertions, CRISPR/Cas9 and integrase mediated insertions. I also balance and screen for mutations in the adult flies.
Stephen Panossian
Laboratory Animal Technician Assistant
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Silver Spring Maryland United States of America
stephenpanossian@gmail.com
Insect Transformation Facility
Supporting host-pathogen interaction (mosquito-Plasmodium) research.
Joseph Sarro
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana United States
jsarro@nd.edu
Senior analyst in bioinformatics
My current research focuses on analyzing next generation sequencing for the purposes of arthropod development, cancer, and more.
Richu Singla
Regional Station
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
richu@pau.edu

Insect Molecular Biology
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Michelle Anderson
Lab Manager
CV
Fralin Life Science Institute and Department of Entomology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg VA USA
manderson@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in our laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Tonya Colpitts
Assistant Professor
CV
Pathology Microbiology & Immunology
University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Columbia SC USA
tonya.colpitts@uscmed.sc.edu
COLPITTS LAB
Our laboratory researches the interactions between arboviruses and mosquito vectors, with a focus on dengue virus and the Aedes midgut. We are also examining the impact of human serum components on mosquito immunity and virus infection and developing transmission blocking vaccines against arboviruses.
Wendy Smith
Associate Professor and Interim Chair
Biology
Northeastern University
Boston MA USA
w.smith@neu.edu

Regulation of insect growth, development, and immunity
Vikas Suman
Dr.
CV
Insect Cytogenetics
GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE, NERWA
District Shimla Himachal Pradesh INDIA
viks_suman@yahoo.co.in

My research focus on cytological characterization of holocentric chromosomes in Heteropteran insetcs, using C-banding and Fluorescent staining. We identify cytological markers in different families of Heteroptera used to differentiate species which are morphological alike. Also the study help us to classify families which are alike in cytological behaviour not just of morphological characters.
Zeeshan Shaukat
Dr
CV
Genetics and Evolution
University of Adelaide
Adelaide South Australia Australia
zeeshan.shaukat@adelaide.edu.au
Gregory Lab
Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. As CIN is not found in normal cells, it offers a cancer-specific target for therapy. We generated a CIN model in Drosophila by knocking down the spindle checkpoint, and screened for candidate knockdowns that induce apoptosis only in CIN cells. Genes identified include those involved in the DNA damage/repair pathway, JNK signaling pathway, mitotic cytoskeletal regulation and metabolism. The screen demonstrates that it is feasible to selectively kill cells with CIN. CIN is linked to the
Sherry Adrianos
Research Molecular Biologist
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit (SPIERU)
USDA ARS
Manhattan KS USA
7SherryA@gmail.com
Oppert Lab
We are utilizing CRISPR/Cas technology with a goal to control coleopteran storage pests. Tribolium castaneum genes critical for survival are being targeted. These methodologies will be transferred to other stored product pests.
Daniel Pers
PhD Student
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago IL USA
dpers88@gmail.com

Gene Regulatory Networks of Embryo Patterning
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Ulrich Beckers
Dr.
Department of biology and Department of chemistry
Bielefeld University
Gütersloh NRW F. R. Germany
ulrich.beckers@web.de

I am an neuroscientist interested in coding and signal transmission. I work on cellualar level mostly using electrophysiological methods. I want to evaluate genetic methods for my research projects. Primarily I want to learn more about CRIPR/CAS9. I may also look for potential collaborations (am planning to apply for a grant).
Ewan Richardson
Mr
Biochemistry and Crop Protection
Rothamsted
Brighton Sussex United Kingdom
ewan.richardson@rothamsted.ac.uk

I study the mutations underlying resistance to Diamide insecticides amongst moths. Much of my work revolves around structural study of the Ryanodine Receptor, a calcium channel of major importance in all animals. I use transgenesis to explore the impact of Ryanodine Receptor mutations on pesticide resistance in moths, and to determine whether the same effects can be established in other insect orders.
Vanessa Corby-Harris
Research Physiologist
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center
USDA-ARS
Tucson AZ USA
vanessa.corby@ars.usda.gov
Corby-Harris Lab
Our goal is to increase honey bee health through improved nutrition.
Nagraj Sambrani
Postdoc
CV
Lab of Molecular genetics
CDFD, Hyderabad, India
Hyderabad Telengana india
loginnagraj@gmail.com
LMG
My Current Project A major challenge in developmental biology is the elucidation of how changes in patterning mechanisms have contributed to the evolution of morphology. The insect wing is a fascinating developmental system in which to study this question, because of presence of vast diversification in insect wing morphologies. The proposed research will compare
Anyi Mazo-Vargas
PhD student
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY US
am2622@cornell.edu
Laboratory of evolution of animal color patterns
I work with wing color patterns in butterflies to answer questions related to the evolution of gene regulation and developmental re-patterning. In my project I am using a mix of old school methods as: in-situ hybridization, antibody stains, drug treatments; and new genomics techniques as: ATAC-seq, RNA-seq and CRISPR-Cas9.
Karan Singh
PhD Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali
Mohali Punjab India
karansinghlabana1984@gmail.com
Evolutionary Biology Lab
My broad area of research interest is evolutionary genetics and host-parasite interaction. My graduate work is mainly focused on how environmental stress shapes life history traits and underlying genetic mechanisms of increased cold stress resistance. Apart from my work on cold shock resistance, I have also focused on host-parasite interaction and I isolated a novel bacterial pathogen (Staphylococcus succinus) of D. melanogaster that is now being extensively used to study evolutionary ecology of immunity.
Kim Ferguson
PhD Candidate
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
kim.ferguson@wur.nl

I am an Early Stage Researcher (ESR) in the BINGO ITN, Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (www.bingo-itn.eu for more info). Right now I'm in the first stage of my PhD so I'm trying to discover as much as possible and learn techniques to help me in my project. I will work with a few different species, but the goal is to use NGS technology to explore the genetic variation in wild-caught and commercially reared populations of select biocontrol species. I will work with Trichogramma brassicae, Nesidiocoris tenuis, and Amblyseious swirskii (aka Typhlodromips swirskii). They
Joshua Fisher
Invasive Species Biologist
Ecological Services
US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior
Honolulu Hawaii US
joshua_fisher@fws.gov

Vector Control, Avian Malaria
Luciano Cosme
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
luciano.cosme@yale.edu
Powell's Lab
Mosquito evolutionary genetics. Gene and miR expression.
Kathleen Cuijvers
Biological Sciences
The University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA Australia
kathleen.cuijvers@student.adelaide.edu.au

Alzheimer's research using zebrafish in vivo system.
Val Saffer
Administrative Assistant
Dr. David O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Rockville MD USA
safferv@ibbr.umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
None.
Deanna Arsala
PhD Student
CV
Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago IL United States
darsal2@uic.edu
Lynch Lab
My main research focus is understanding how the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) functions in haplodiploid embryos using Nasonia as a model organism. Using RNA-seq and a functional approach (eRNAi, pRNAi), I aim to uncover regulators of the MZT. I am also researching how sex identity is established in Nasonia during the MZT and how major zygotic gene activation in the early embryo is influenced by gene body methylation using epigenomic profiling and transcriptomic approaches (RNAi-RNA-seq, ATAC-seq, WGBSeq).
Joaquin de Navascues
Research Fellow
European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute
Cardiff University
Cardiff Cardiff United Kingdom
denavascuesj@cardiff.ac.uk

I am interested in how cells take decisions based on inter cellular signalling, in particular about differentiation. I study this in the context of the adult intestinal stem cells of the fruit fly.
Rick DeRose
External Collaborations and Technology Acquistion
Syngenta
RTP NC USA
rick.derose@syngenta.com

Mechanisms and methods for controlling insects.
Johannes Schinko
Dr. rer. nat.
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhone-Alpes France
johannesschinko@hotmail.com

Genetic interactions during posterior elongation in short germ band insects.
Anna Gilles
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhône-Alpes France
anna.f.gilles@gmail.com

I am working on posterior development in the insect model Tribolium castaneum. In contrast to Drosophila, the abdominal segments of Tribolium develop from a posterior growth zone during embryogenesis in a process similar to vertebrate somitogenesis. My project aims to understand the cellular basis of this by characterizing cell behavior both by in vivo imaging experiments and by clonal analysis. While the posterior growth zone of short germ insects has been described as a proliferative tissue in the classical literature, recent studies and my own data point to cell rearrangement as the main cause of posterior elongation. I am currently
Laura Sirot
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
College of Wooster
Wooster OH USA
lsirot@wooster.edu
Evolutionary and Applied Reproductive Biology
We are broadly interested in the reproductive behavior of animals, including mechanisms that males and females use to influence reproductive success. Our current research focuses on reproductive behavior and physiology in several species including: the pomace fly (Drosophila melanogaster), the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), and humans.
Tetsuro Shinoda
Division of Insect Sciences
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
shinoda@affrc.go.jp

Molecular mechanisms of juvenile hormone action
Richard Meisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Biochemistry
University of Houston
Houston TX United States
rpmeisel@uh.edu

Evolutionary genomics of sex chromosomes, sex determination, and sexual dimorphism in flies.
Maria-Dolors Piulachs
Research Scientist at CSIC
Functional Genomics and Evolution
Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
Barcelona APO/FPO EUROPE / ATLANTIC Spain
mdolors.piulachs@ibe.upf-csic.es
Insect reproduction Lab.
Our long term objective is to elucidate how the oogenesis in insects is regulated, considering the structural diversity of ovary types and their respective evolutionary history.
Christy Waits
Bioscience Technologist
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Jacksonville FL USA
christy.m.waits.ctr@mail.mil
Testing and Evaluation Department
Test and evaluate novel pesticides and equipment for use in disease vector control.
Heather Hines
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology, Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
hmh19@psu.edu
Hines Lab
My lab examines the evolution of adaptive trait variation, focusing heavily on the evolution of mimetic patterning. We are pushing a new system for evolutionary genetics and evo-devo in discovery of the genes that are driving the radiation in coloration, largely as a result of mimicry, in the bumble bees. We utilize more descriptive analytical chemsitry, developmental and systematic approaches, and combine these with genomic and transcriptomic approaches to target candidate genes for mimicry and better understand the evolution of this adaptive diversification. Once these genes are targeted we can gain a better understanding of how these novel phenotypes evolved,
Salim Ansari
Evolutionary developmental genetics
Georg August University, Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony  Germany
salim786biotech@gmail.com

I am one of the screener in the iBeetle project which is a genome-wide RNAi screening in red floor beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Our aim is to knockdown each & every gene of Tribolium castaneum by RNAi technique. We have following three main purpose from iBeetle project. 1. To identify the genes from those process which is either not present in Drosophila (stink gland, embryonic leg development etc.) or difficult to study (head involuted). 2. To make the Tribolium as efficient complementary screening platform to identify the function of conserved gene which is not easy
Fernando Consoli
PhD
Dept of Entomology and Acarology
University of Sao Paulo/ESALQ
Piracicaba Sao Paulo Brazil
fconsoli@usp.br
Insect Interactions Lab
Our lab is dedicated to understand the diversity and role of symbionts in insect bioecology, and to investigate the potential of symbionts for biotechnological exploitation. We also use functional transcriptomic and genomic analyses to investigate insect-insect and insect-symbionts interactions and to develop strategies for pest control (RNAi).
Alexandros Belavilas-Trovas
Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
alexbelavilas@hotmail.com
Molecular biology & genomics-Mathiopoulos lab
The analysis of genes involved in the sexual behaviour of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. Our purpose is the use of these data for the improvement of the SIT approaches or other innovative pest control strategies
T.G. Emyr Davies
Dr
Biological Chemistry & Crop Protection
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire UK
emyr.davies@rothamsted.ac.uk
Senior Research Scientist
Recent research has been focused on understanding the molecular basis of target site (voltage-gated sodium channel, ryanodine receptor) resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, DDT and diamide insecticides in agricultural pests and vectors of human disease. Currently working towards establishing a transformation platform at Rothamsted using CRISPRs/TALENs and transgenic D. melanogaster to study metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms.
Ademir Martins
PhD
CV
Laficave
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ)
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
ademirjr@ioc.fiocruz.br
Lab of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors
Insecticide resistance mechanisms in insects of medical importance
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Paula Irles
Assistant Professor
Institute of Agronomic Science
Universidad de O'Higgins
Rancagua Libertador Bernardo O'Higgins Chile
pirles@uc.cl

My research focused on the molecular mechanisms under insect oogenesis, specifically which and how signaling pathways are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death during ovary maturation. I am currently work on the role of Hippo signaling pathway during ovarian and embryo development in earwigs.
Nathaniel Grubbs
Postdoctoral Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
npgrubbs@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
My primary research focus is on the characterization of the naturally occurring, selfish genetic element, Medea, in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Medea operates by killing any offspring of a heterozygous mother that do not inherit at least one copy from either parent, but how the element causes this lethality, or prevents it, is still unknown. Understanding this function could give us valuable insight into selfish genetic elements, and perhaps even enable us to use Medea as a stable gene-drive in other species. I am also working with others in the lab to help develop molecular tools for studying the
Santosh sarathy
molecular entomology
NBAIR
Bangalore Karnataka India
santoshsarathy@gmail.com

Expression profiling for insecticide resistance
Aine O’Sullivan
Department of Entomology
Penn State University
University Park PA USA
aiosullivan29@gmail.com
Grozinger Lab
My research is focused on how bumble bee health can be improved by implementation of different genetic technologies to mitigate the effects of abiotic and biotic stressors.
Sumeyra Sanal
PhD student
Molecular Entomology
Anadolu University
Eskisehir Tepebası Turkey
sumeyrasanal@gmail.com

Genetic and phylogeographical settlement of Tabanidae genus in the Turkey Fauna
sekhar srikakolapu
Mr.
CV
laboratory of molecular genetics
Center for DNA fingerprinting and Diagnostics
hyderabad Andhra Pradesh india
sekharsri5@gmail.com
Laboratory Of molecular genetics
Elucidation of alternative Splicing mechanism and genome editing through CRISPR Cas9 in Bombyx mori
Atef Sayed
CV
Biological control
Plant Protection Research
Ismailia Ismailia Egypt
atef.mahmoud1@gmail.com

Willing to collaborate on : - Genetic and molecular researches and biotechnological and nanotechnology approaches for the management of insect pests. - Improve pest control strategies and programs for major economic pests and crops through new applied research results. - Maximization of biological control and other relevant substitutes within the framework of IPM and environmentally safe methods.
Dina Fonseca
Professor
Entomology; Ecology&Evolution, Public Health
Rutgers University
Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics, Smithsonian
New Brunswick NJ USA
dinafons@rci.rutgers.edu
Fonseca
My primary research interests are the evolution, prevention, and control of invasive mosquitoes, the principal vectors of significant disease epizootics and epidemics. Our results indicate that populations differ in vectorial capacity over space and time, profoundly affecting epidemiological landscapes and risk estimates. Rapid evolution in invasive mosquito vectors is a good model for the effects of Global Climate Change on disease epidemiology.
Anna-Louise Doss
Graduate Student Researcher
Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Graduate Program
University of California, Riverside
Riverside California United States
adoss001@ucr.edu
Peter Atkinson Lab
My dissertation research centers on elucidating DNA transposon structure and function and, reciprocally, on exploiting transposons as robust genetic tools in the field of mosquito-borne disease control.
Justin Overcash
Graduate Research Assistant
Genetics
Texas A&M
College Station Texas USA
justmo1@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
DNA double stranded break repair, manipulation of the classical non-homologous end joining pathway to achieved desired gene editing, gene drive mechanisms in Aedes aegypti & CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing techniques
Andrea Gloria-Soria
Associate Research Scientist
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
andrea.gloria-soria@yale.edu
Powell Lab & Turner Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested on the behavioral genetics of feeding behavior in mosquitoes and its consequences for dengue transmission. I also conduct population genetic studies on Aedes aegypti mosquitos to understand historical and recent invasions.
Kimberly Stephens
Entomology
University of California - Riverside
Riverside California United States
kstep002@ucr.edu

Sperm motility and sperm-egg interactions
Kalindu Ramyasoma
Post Graduate Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
Faculty of Science, University of Colombo
Colombo 03 Western Province Sri Lanka
kd.ramyasoma@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
My research interest focused to engineering RNA interference based resistant to all Dengue serotypes in Aedes aegypti vector mosquitos using transgenic technology. Genetic manipulation of Aedes mosquitos express RNAi genes in mosquito tissues under control of tissue specific promoters and genes repress or inhibits the expression of dengue viral proteins.
Akhtar Rasool
Assistant Professor
Centre for Animal Sciences and Fisheries
University of Swat
Mingora, Swat Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan
akhtarrasool@hotmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology Lab
I am interested in insect molecular biology mainly, insect evolved resistance mechanisms against chemical and biological insecticides. My research focuses is lepidopteran pests, one of the diverse pest insect order and which have threaten agriculture because they have evolved resistance to a wide range of pesticides.
Hasan Basibuyuk
Dr
Biology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Central Anatolia Turkey
hbbuyuk@cumhuriyet.edu.tr
CUMSAG
My main research areas include higher-level phylogeny, functional morphology, and systematics of Hymenoptera. I am interested in phylogeny and taxonomy of Turkish sawflies, in particularly stem borers (Cephidae), and also molecular systematics, evolution, phylogeny and phylogeography of Anatolian biodiversity. My ongoing research projects are on the evolution of mitochondrial genome in Hymenoptera (mostly sawflies) and utility of COI and ITS2 in barcoding of holo-and hemimetabolous insects.
Isabel Campos
Fly Platform Manager
Fly Platfrom
Champalimaud Foundation
Lisboa Lisboa  Portugal
isabel.campos@neuro.fchampalimaud.org
CF Fly Platform
The CF Fly Platform contributes to CF researchers’ best performance by providing state of the art conditions for fly breeding, maintenance and manipulation, at the same time as offering a range of technical services conducted by a specialized team, headed by an experienced manager with more than 10 years of Drosophila genetics post doctoral training.
Chris Jiggins
Professor
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambridge UK United Kingdom
c.jiggins@zoo.cam.ac.uk
Chris Jiggins
Adaptation and speciation in butterflies, especially focussing on wing pattern development and evolution. Interested to develop transgenic tests of wing pattern developmental factors
Molly Shook
Postdoctoral Associate
Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois
Urbana Illinois United States
mshook@illinois.edu

Epigenetics of aggression in honey bees
Kimberly Johansson
Undergraduate Researcher
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
kimberly.johansson@gmail.com
Extavour Lab
im is an undergraduate in the class of 2015 at Harvard College, where she is concentrating in Chemical & Physical Biology. In the Extavour Lab, she works with Taro Nakamura studying primordial germ cell development in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.
Konstantina Tsoumani
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
CV
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
kotsouma@bio.uth.gr
Molecular biology & Genomics - Mathiopoulos Lab
Genomic and transcriptomic analyses using NGS data, identification and functional analyses of genes involved 1) in reproductive behaviour including the olfactory and gustatory systems of the olive fruit fly, as well as 2) in embryogenesis, that can be used in the development of new genetic control strategies of the olive fly.
Raman Chandrasekar
Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
manhattan Kansas United States
biochandrus@yahoo.com
Research Associate
1. RNA Sequence analysis, Genomic and Proteomics appraoches 2. Study of insect proteins and enzymes will not only give valuable information on their unique biochemistry and physiology but will also identify novel tools for the development of new technologies and new ways to produce novel insect control measures. My main focus is will address the physiological and biochemical functions of proteins and enzymes in the insects’ life processes by using proteomics tools (i.e 2D PAGE, MS, MALDI-TOF, PMF), characterization of novel enzymes, qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their interactions on a genome scale,
Keshava Mysore
PhD
CV
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine - University of Notre Dame
South Bend Indiana USA
kmysore@iu.edu
Duman-Scheel Lab
I am currently studying functional and developmental neurogenetics of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.
Muhammad Tayyib Naseem
CV
Agriculture Biotechnology Division
National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
tayyibnaseem@hotmail.com
Muhammad Naseem
DNA based identification of aphid species and vector-virus association analysis of aphid borne luteovirus
John Chaston
Assistant Professor
Genetics & Biotechnology
Brigham Young University
Provo UT USA
john_chaston@byu.edu

genetic basis for Drosophila-microbiota interactions
Roya Nasirian
Plant Protection
University of Mohaghegh Ardabili
Ardebil IRAN IRAN
nasirian.roya@yahoo.com

Investigate digestive enzymes
prof prem raj pushpakaran
professor
BioTechnology
NITC
calicut kerala india
drpremrajp@nitc.ac.in

immunology, bio-informatics
Robert Waterhouse
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
University of Geneva Medical School
Geneva Geneva Switzerland
robert.waterhouse@unige.ch
Computational Evolutionary Genomics Group
Evolutionary genomics of mosquitoes and other insects.
Mubarak Hussain Syed
Dr
University of Oregon
HHMI/Institute for neurobiology
Eugene Oregon United States
mosvey@gmail.com
Doe lab
Drosophila neural Stem cell temporal identity
DEEPAK KUMAR SINHA
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology
M.M. University, India
AMBALA HARYANA INDIA
deepak22sinha@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Entomologist
I developed deep interest in insect pest biology with regards to its interaction with host. My research area deals with understanding the molecular basis of insect-plant interactions. In this broad field, I am specially interested in insect pests of crops such as rice and wheat. I have worked on gall midge, aphids and want to focus more on yellow stem borers. I want to understand aspects of virulence of these pests and also investigate into the role of different gut bacteria in virulence.
Qi Su
Ph.D
Department of Entomology
Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
suqicaas@163.com

I am interested in studying the multitrophic interactions between whiteflies, especially the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci, Begomoviruses, especially Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and bacterial endosymbionts that reside within the whiteflies. I am further interested in several aspects of ensosymbiont influence on the whitefly biology and interactions with biotic and abiotic stress.
Andrew Straw
IMP Fellow
Circuit Neuroscience
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP)
Vienna Vienna Austria
andrew.straw@imp.ac.at
Straw Lab
The questions we address are as follows. 1) What are the identity and function of neurons and molecules required for specific behaviors? This is neural circuit mapping. 2) What are individual sub-behaviors an animal uses and how do these sub-behaviors interact? We define, rigorously quantify, and model these sub-behaviors and their interactions with ideas from control theory, Bayesian inference and cognitive science. This is systems behavior. 3) We want to connect these levels of understanding into a mapping that lets us traverse from neuronal implementation to computational task and behavioral context in a rigorous way. Ultimately, we aim to link
durga prasad
Dr
Entomology - cotton
Regional Agricultural Research Station,Lam,Guntur,Andhra Pradesh -522034,India
Guntur Andhra Pradesh India
nemanidp@yahoo.com
Cotton entomology lab
Insect Toxicology
Eveline Verhulst
PhD
CV
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Wageningen The Netherlands
e.c.verhulst@gmail.com

My main research focuses on the evolution of sex determining mechanisms in insects. From 2014 onwards, I am funded by a NWO Veni grant to determine how this one conserved gene, called doublesex, can regulate the diverse sexual morphologies found in insects. This research is hosted at the Wageningen University (WUR) in the Laboratory of Genetics group. The main ambition of my research is to compare the sex determining pathways of three parasitic wasp species: Nasonia vitripennis, Muscidifurax raptorellus and M. uniraptor.
Gary Blissard
Professor
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
gwb1@cornell.edu
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
Jason Pitts
Research Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Baylor University
Nashville Tennessee United States
jason_pitts@baylor.edu

I am interested in answering fundamental questions about the chemical ecology and sensory biology of disease vector insects. Chemoreception is a major driver of multiple insect behaviors, all of which are critical for survival and reproduction. The molecular basis for many peripheral chemoreception events is still poorly understood, although some insect chemoreceptor gene families, such as odorant receptors and variant ionotropic receptors, have been identified. My research is focused on many aspects of insect chemosensation including novel gene discovery, gene expression analysis, and receptor function. My long-term objective is to contribute to reductions in human disease transmission at the local
Natalia Vinasco Arias
Biological Control Researcher
Caldas University
Manizales Caldas Colombia
vinasco.natalia@gmail.com

I'm Agronomic Engineer with specialization in Biological Control, IPMs and Biology Molecular of Insects pest. In this moment, I'm working in paratiroides of order Diptera for control of weevils and other pest of citrus and fruits of region. Also, I´m working in peptides antimicrobial of plants for include in the control of bacterias and insects pest.
Brittany Dodson
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA USA
bld25@psu.edu

Recently there has been a lot of excitement surrounding the study of microorganisms that live inside us and how they influence our health. Insects also have relationships with their own microorganisms, but most research surrounding them has merely been descriptive. Medically important insects (like mosquitoes) vary in their ability to transmit pathogens, possibly due to differences between internal environments of those insects. Studies have found that mosquito bacteria abundance and diversity may impact malaria parasites. However, the identity, function and utility of those microbes are virtually unknown, especially in mosquitoes that transmit viruses. I am investigating how bacteria within the mosquito
John Marshall
MRC Research Fellow
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Imperial College London
London London UK
john.marshall@imperial.ac.uk

My research focuses on the use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. I have worked in a mosquito genetic engineering lab, and have developed mathematical models to describe the spread of anti-malaria genes through mosquito populations. I have also commentated on regulatory issues related to GM mosquitoes capable of spreading across international borders, and conducted the first public attitude survey on perspectives of people in Africa to GM mosquitoes for malaria control. Results from this survey suggested people would be supportive of GM mosquitoes that have been shown to work in confined field trials. This
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Kajan Muneeswaran
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
University of Colombo
Colombo Western province Sri Lanka
kajan.muneeswaran@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
Developing transgenic mosquitoes resistant to all four dengue viral serotypes in Sri Lanka by RNA interference pathway which can be activated by the blood-meal in female mosquitoes to combat against the #1 killer dengue disease which kills more than 200 annually.
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Julia Bristow
Biological Sciences
Syngeta
Bracknell Berkshire England
Julia.Bristow@syngenta.com

Molecular Biology and Genetics
Valentina Resnik
Intitut für Bienenkunde, Oberursel
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Oberusel Hessen Germany
valentinaresnik@gmx.de

Comparative analysis of metabotropic transmitter receptors in the honeybee and its external parasitic mite Varroa destructor
Peter Cherbas
Professor emeritus
Biology
Indiana University
Bloomington IN USA
cherbas@indiana.edu

Drosophila development. Ecdysone. Cell lines.
Alekos Simoni
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London London United Kingdom
a.simoni@imperial.ac.uk

Applying state of the art molecular biology to vector control with the aim of reducing malaria transmission
Hideki Sezutsu
Head
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
hsezutsu@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research lab
We are developing transgenic silkworms for fundamental research and applications. Our aims are to understand insect functions and evolution, in addition to design the insects for the creation of new insect-industries.
Takuya Tsubota
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
tsubota@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
My research is concerned with the development of silkworm transgenic technique and its application. I succeeded in identifying a novel silkworm strong and ubiquitous promoter, that is, hsp90 promoter. Using the novel techniques, I want to clarify lepidopteran-specific biological phenomena such as gene regulation in the silk gland.
Tamsin Jones
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
tjones01@fas.harvard.edu
Extavour Lab
I am interested in the evolution of germ line genes and their function. My current project examines the evolution of the oskar gene in insects. In flies, oskar is essential for germ line development, but in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, oskar functions in neural development. I am studying the molecular function of oskar in the cricket early nervous system.
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Diana Cox-Foster
Professor
Entomology
Penn State
Univ. Park PA USA
dxc12@psu.edu
Cox-Foster Lab
My Lab is interested in host/pathogen interactions. We are interested in genes associated with the immune system and cuticular exoskeleton (biosynthesis and molting). We are interested in immune responses to viruses, and responses to parasites such as nematodes and varroa mites. In particular, the anti-viral immune responses are of interest, going from point of infection to death of the insect host.
Helena Richardson
Group Leader
CV
Research
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne V ictoria Australia
Drh_richardson@yahoo.com.au
Cell cycle and development lab
My research ulilizes the vinegar fly, Drosophila, to model tumourigenesis, with the vision of understanding how regulators of cell polarity and the actin cytoskeleton impact on cell signalling and cell proliferation, a field in which she is internationally recognised. She collaborates with mammalian researchers to translate her findings to mouse and human cancer models.
Panagiota Koskinioti
Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
pakoskin@bio.uth.gr

My research focuses on the role of the host preference and the presence of symbionts in the genetic profile of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
John Masly
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
University of Oklahoma
Norman OK U.S.A.
masly@ou.edu

The primary goal of the research performed in my lab is to understand the mechanisms that generate biodiversity. We use molecular and genomic technologies to study how genetic change directs the development of differences between species and ultimately gives rise to two important evolutionary processes— speciation and phenotypic evolution. We study four closely related species of fruit flies that belong to the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, which allows us to take advantage of the arsenal of genetic, genomic, and molecular tools available in D. melanogaster. More recently, we have begun to develop North American damselflies in the genus Enallagma as
Adriana Costero-Saint Denis
Vector Biology Program Officer
Div. of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Rockville Maryland USA
acostero@niaid.nih.gov

Vector biology
Owain Edwards
Group Leader, Environmental Genomics
Land & Water
CSIRO
Floreat WA Australia
Owain.Edwards@csiro.au
CSIRO Environmental Genomics
Dr Owain Edwards’ research focuses on aphid-host plant interactions at the level of the organism (both aphid and plant) and the molecule, including work with colleagues in the International Aphid Genomics Consortium (IAGC) to characterise the components of aphid saliva. Dr Edwards’ work as part of the IAGC also includes a focus on epigenetic regulation of aphid polyphenism, in particular the roles of DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs in modulating aphid development. With collaborators at the University of Melbourne, Dr Edwards is investigating novel strategies to control invertebrate pests through better management of insecticide resistance, and by using
William Stumph
Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
San Diego State University
San Diego CA USA
wstumph@mail.sdsu.edu

My lab studies the formation of RNA polymerase II and RNA polymerase III transcription pre-initiation complexes on genes that code for the small nuclear RNAs (U1-U6). We are interested in the molecular mechanisms that determine the RNA polymerase specificity of these genes (Pol II on U1-U5 versus Pol III on U6). We particularly study the snRNA gene-specific transcription factor SNAPc that binds about 40 to 60 base pairs upstream of both classes of genes.
Rodney Richardson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Columbus  Ohio USA
richardson.827@osu.edu

My research efforts focus on issues pertaining to toxicology and immunology in the European honey bee. Specifically, I am interested in the discovery and mechanistic explanation of how environmentally encountered xenobiotics affect insect immune function.
Christopher Jones
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
Moravian College
Bethlehem PA United States
jonesc@moravian.edu

My lab focuses primarily on behavioral genetics, currently a phenotype in Drosophila called "bang-sensitivity," in which subjecting the flies to strong physical shocks (as in a standard lab vortex) triggers seizures.
Reed Johnson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
johnson.5005@osu.edu

In our lab we are seeking to understand how pollinators interact with the pesticides and toxins they encounter. The managed European honey bee, Apis mellifera, serves as a model pollinator for toxicological testing and toxicogenomics. While the honey bee is the most economically important pollinator in the U.S. and serves as an excellent model species, we are also interested in other pollinating insects as well.
John Rebers
Department Head
CV
Biology
Northern Michigan University
Marquette MI USA
jrebers@nmu.edu

Structure of arthropod cuticular proteins, particularly as related to chitin binding.
Gulsaz Shamim
CV
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
gulsazshamim@gmail.com
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
Tom Walsh
Research Scientist
Land and Water
CSIRO
Canberra ACT Australia
tom.walsh@csiro.au

I'm particularly interested in resistance to pesticides and using genomic and molecular techniques to investigate the evolutionary history and functional biology of these traits.
Liang Sun
Tea cultivation and pest control
Tea Research Institution, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science
Hangzhou Zhejiang China
liangsun1029@126.com

Molecular and cellular mechanism of insect olfactory detection
Christopher Jones
Dr
AgroEcology
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire United Kingdom
christopher.jones@rothamsted.ac.uk
Post-doctoral Researcher
I have worked with insects of both medical and agricultural importance to understand the genetic basis of phenotypes, and in particular, insecticide resistance. I currently study insect migration in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, combining tethered flight assays with genomic approaches to understand the genetic basis of this phenomenon.
Monique van Oers
Prof dr
Laboratory of Virology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland Netherlands
monique.vanoers@wur.nl
Insect Virology
Insect virus host interactions, baculoviruses, SGHV, iridovirus, lepidoptera, Glossinia, Spodoptera exigua, behavioral manipulation, virus entry mechanisms
Nico Posnien
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
nico.posnien@gmail.com

My main focus of our research is understanding the molecular basis of natural variation in complex morphological traits. We mainly work on insect and spider systems and apply genome wide approaches in combination with classical developmental biology methods.
Graham Thompson
Associate Professor
Biology
Western University
London Ontario Canada
graham.thompson@uwo.ca
The Social Biology Group
My lab studies the biological basis of insect social behaviour; how it evolves, how it is maintained and why some species are social while others are not. Much like human societies, eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites show bewildering complexity in how their societies are structured. Yet for insects, this complexity is derived from an economically simple division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive specialists. Studying reproductive division of labour in insects at the level of the gene can provide key insights into how complex social systems evolved from simpler, ancestral ones. Studies on social insects can also help understand
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
Giuseppe Saccone
PhD, Assist. Professor
Department of Biology
University Federico II of Naples
Naples Italy Italy
giuseppe.saccone@unina.it
Sex Evo Devo
Evolution of sex determining genes and networks in dipteran species of economic or medical relevance. Molecular entomology and Insect Biotechnology. We have uncovered in the mediterranean fruitly Ceratitis capitata a key epigenetic gene for female sex determination, Cctra(ep), which has an additional autoregulatory function compared to the Drosophila tra orthologue, which lost it. In Ceratitis, as in Drosophila, Cctra(ep) controls the splicing of the downstream doublex and fruitless genes. We and others have found that this evolutionary version of transformer(ep) is a master gene for female sex determination widely conserved in Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera. We have developed a
Marla Sokolowski
University Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto
Toronto Ontario Canada
marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca
Sokolowski Lab: Genes, Environment and Behaviour
We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences (gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect behavior. Experiential affects, like developmental ones can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but
Tatiana Torres
Assistant Professor
Genetics and Evolutionary Biology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo SP Brazil
tttorres@ib.usp.br
Genomics and Evolution of Arthropods
Our research focuses on the investigation of patterns of variability observed in genes and genomes, particularly regulatory variation, and understanding the underlying evolutionary processes involved in the emergence of these patterns. To pursue this we use insects and other arthropods as model organisms.
Cynthia Staber
Sr. Laboratory Manager
Zeitlinger Lab
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Kansas City MO USA
cst@stowers.org
Zeitlinger Lab
I have worked on Segregation Distorter for many years and now work on regulation of developmental timing in the Drosophila embryo.
Steve Stowers
Assistant professor
Cell Biology and Neuroscience
Montana State University
Bozeman Montana United States
sstowers@montana.edu

How sensory information is processed by the nervous system to produce behavioral outputs is a long-standing problem in neuroscience, but one far from being understood. My lab exploits the many advantages of the Drosophila model system to study the relationship between somatosensory input and behavior. Our overall strategy is to first map neural circuits associated with specific somatosensory neurons and then manipulate and measure neuronal activity within the circuit to elucidate the fundamental principles of neuronal circuit logic. Since the depth with which a neural circuit will be understood will correlate with the precision with which it can be manipulated, we
Nicholas Teets
Assistant Professor
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY USA
n.teets@uky.edu

My research centers on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which insects survive extreme environmental conditions. Specifically I am interested in the signaling mechanisms governing rapid responses to cold and other environmental stress, and how these pathways can be manipulated for pest control. I use an integrative approach to study these questions from multiple levels of biological organization, using cell biology, functional genomics, and transgenic methods to study these pathways in both model and non-model species.
Ramasamy Asokan
Principal Scientist (Agricultural Entomology)
CV
Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bangalore  Karnataka INDIA
asokaniihr@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology
RNAi in the management of 1. Sap sucking insects viz. Thrips, whiteflies, aphids, leaf hoppers, mirids 2. Lepidoptera (Helicoverpa armigera, Spodoptera litura, Plutella xylostella) 3. Discovery and utilization of small RNAs especially microRNAs from insect pests
Carlos Gustavo Nunes Silva
Professor
Department of Genetics
Universidade Federal do Amazonas
Manaus Amazonas Brazil
cgmanaus@gmail.com
Lab. DNA technologies
"Beeotechnology"
Maria Cristina Silva
PhD.
CV
Biotechniology
Embrapa Genetic Resource and Biotechnology
Brasilia DF BRAZIL
cristina.mattar@embrapa.br
Plant Pest Molecular Interaction
Specialist in plant molecular biology, works in the area of plant biotechnology aimed at resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Undertakes research focusing on the following themes: Evolution of molecules in vitro selection of variants with improved activity, molecular interaction studies aiming to plant pest resistance to insects.
Ludvik Gomulski
Department of Biology and Biotechnology
University of Pavia
Pavia PV Italy
gomulski@unipv.it
Genetics and genomics of insects of economic and medical importance
We are using transcriptome data to analyze the molecular changes that accompany major physiological and behavioral changes such as maturation and mating in different insect species of medical and agricultural importance. We are particularly interested in transcriptional changes in olfactory related genes.
Dimitrios Kontogiannatos
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology Department
Agricultural University of Athens
Athens Attika Greece
dim_kontogiannatos@yahoo.gr

I am studying the use of RNAi technology in several aspects of Insect Science, like functional genomics, endocrinology and pest management (Baculovirus, bacterial-mediated dsRNA delivery and direct transfer of dsRNAs) in the Lepidopteran species Sesamia nonagrioides.  I am also working with insect cell lines and baculovirus technology in order to express and biochemically characterize important developmental genes of several insect pests. 
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Maarten Jongsma
Dr
Business Unit Bioscience
Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Center
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
maarten.jongsma@wur.nl
High throughput phenotyping plant resistance to insects
I am involved both in studies of insect behaviour on plants using videotracking technology and highly parallel arena plates as well as in GPCR olfactory and taste receptor studies based on a new microfluidic platform
Renata Da Rosa
PhD
CV
Department of General Biology
State University of Londrina - Brazil
Londrina Paraná Brazil
renata-darosa@uel.br
Laboratory of Animal Cytogenetics
Molecular entomology; Functional Genomics in insects; Molecular cytogenetics and cytogenomics.
Omogo Collins
Mr.
CV
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
International Centre For Insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Kenya Kenya
graomogo@yahoo.com
Icipe-Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Unit
My career goal is to be an investigator in tropical medicine, focusing in research on the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), and emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), with focus on the identification and validation of novel drug targets for chemotherapeutic control.
Jonas Schwirz
Project Group Bioresources
Fraunhofer IME
Giessen Hessen Germany
jonas.schwirz@ime.fraunhofer.de

Drosophila genetics and transgenesis
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Frank Criscione
Entomology
University of Maryland
Rockville MD USA
fcris@umd.edu

Enhancer trap technologies and mosquito hematology.
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Alimorad Sarafrazi
Dr
CV
Insect Taxonomy Research Department
Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection
Tehran Tehran/Asia Iran
asarafrazi@yahoo.com
Heteroptera
I'm working on the taxoxnomy of Heteroptera based on morphological and molecular characters. I have also working on the population Genetics of these taxa. Recently I have conducted some works on phyloclimatics of Heteroptera combining the genetic structure and distribution modeling
Peter Armbruster
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC USA
paa9@georgetown.edu
Armbruster
Research in my lab is focused on understanding processes of phenotypic evolution in natural populations and the molecular bases of adaptation. Our approach to these questions is integrative. We perform a wide range of studies, including field ecology, quantitative and population genetics, and molecular physiology. We are currently studying the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus, a vector of both dengue fever and Chikungunya virus. Our research intersects with a variety of topics in both invasive species biology and medical entomology, and we are particularly interested in novel approaches that lie at the interface of these
Luc Swevers
Dr
Biosciences & Applications
NCSR "Demokritos"
Aghia Paraskevi (Athens) Attiki Greece
swevers@bio.demokritos.gr
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
1) Molecular analysis of the developmental program that directs follicular cell differentiation during oogenesis in silkmoths : in vitro culture of ovarioles, molecular analysis of ecdysone response, analysis of transcription factor function, functional analysis of the nuclear receptor BmE75 during the transition from vitellogenesis to choriogenesis. 2) Analysis of small RNA pathways in lepidopteran insects: the RNA-binding proteins R2D2 and Translin. Development of methods to increase the efficiency of RNAi in lepidopteran insects. 3) Development of methods for control of insect pests: development of baculoviruses as transformation vectors, exploration of transposable elements for insect transformation, environmental RNAi, insect growth regulators. 4)
Paul Linser
Professor of Cell Biology
Whitney Laboratory
University of Florida
Saint Augustine Florida USA
pjl@whitney.ufl.edu
Linser Lab
Cell biology of a number of organismal systems. In regard to mosquitoes, my group has focused on epithelial physiology and cell biology as it impacts alimentary canal function. Tools we use include transcriptomics, electrophysiology, advanced imaging (light microscopy), general molecular biology.
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes
Associate Professor
Entomology and Plant Pathology
University of Tennessee
Knoxville TN USA
jurat@utk.edu

Our research is focused on the physiology of the insect gut, particularly the molecular characterization of interactions between the gut epithelium and insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the identification of novel enzymes for biofuel production, and the characterization of the gut regenerative response after pathogenic attack.
Julie Reynolds
Postdoctoral Researcher
Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
reynolds.473@osu.edu
Postdoctoral Researcher
Molecular, Biochemical, and Physiological aspects of diapause.
Michael Kanost
Distinguished Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kanost@ksu.edu
Kanost lab
My laboratory is investigating proteins present in the hemolymph (blood) of insects, with special interest in the proteins' functions in the insect immune system. We are studying plasma proteins, including prophenoloxidase, serine proteases, protease inhibitors from the serpin superfamily, and proteins that bind to microbial polysaccharides. The long range goal is to understand the biochemical and cellular processes by which insect immune systems recognize and respond to pathogens and parasites. We also investigate the biochemistry of cuticle proteins and their roles in determining mechanical properties of insect exoskeletons. A third current research area is the biochemistry of multicopper oxidases in
Paul Eggleston
Prof.
Life Sciences
Keele University
Keele Staffs. UK
p.eggleston@keele.ac.uk
Molecular Entomology
My research interests are in molecular entomology, particularly the molecular genetics of mosquitoes that transmit human disease and their complex interactions with the parasites and viruses that cause disease. Because of their medical importance, the focus of my group is on the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Current projects include the development of technologies for genetic engineering of mosquitoes, the creation of genetically modified mosquitoes that are compromised in their ability to transmit disease and the development of strategies for stage- and tissue-specific gene expression within genetically modified mosquitoes. My research has attracted
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Daniel Sonenshine
Professor (Emeritus)
Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk Virginia United States
dsonensh@odu.edu
Tick Lab
Neurobiology of ticks; transcriptomics; neuropeptides, neurotransmitters; tick-borne pathogens; innate immunity; pheromones.
Christina Schulte
CV
Heinrich-Heine University
Evolutionary Genetics
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
christina-schulte@gmx.de

Honeybee workers show altruistic behaviors in contrast to queens and drones, which show behaviors that are related to reproduction. The collective behaviors of the worker bees produce group phenotypes that allow them to remain well-adapted in a changing environment. These worker specific behaviors have been largely described but we have little understanding of the molecular control that specifies these behaviors in the brain during development, and of its evolution that gave rise to social behaviors during the last 60 million years. Differentiation of the worker brain is specified by female- and caste-determining signals. The sex-determining signal is implemented by Feminizer protein
Don Jarvis
Professor
Molecular Biology
University of Wyoming
Laramie WY USA
dljarvis@uwyo.edu

Insect glycobiology with a focus on elucidation and genetic manipulation of pathways of glycoprotein biosynthesis. Developing novel/improved baculovirus-insect cell/insect expression systems.
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Gene Robinson
Swanlund Chair of Entomology
Department of Entomology and Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana IL USA
generobi@illinois.edu
Robinson Lab
Robinson uses genomics and systems biology to study the mechanisms and evolution of social life. His principal model system is the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, along with other species of bees. The goal is to explain the function and evolution of behavioral mechanisms that integrate the activity of individuals in a society, neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate behavior within the brain of the individual, and the genes that influence social behavior. Research focuses on division of labor, aggression, and the famous dance language, a system of symbolic communication. Current projects include: 1) nutritional regulation of brain gene expression
Marten Edwards
Assoc. Professor
Biology
Muhlenberg College
Allentown PA USA
edwards@muhlenberg.edu
Edwards
I am interested in corpora allata expression in Aedes aegypti. I have prepared 8 constructs that contain 1-3 kb upstream regions of JH biosynthetic enzyme genes fused to EGFP and would like to test them in transgenic Ae. aegypti. If anyone is interested in collaborating with me to test these constructs, please contact me.
Jackson Sparks
Postdoctoral Research Entomologist
Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Lab
ARS-USDA
Beltsville MD USA
jackson.sparks@ars.usda.gov

Our research is aimed at characterizing the molecular components of the mosquito chemosensory repertoire. Our mission is to deliver methods to identify novel repellents or repellent blends. We hope to identify all major molecular classes susceptible to repellent effects in order to screen novel compounds or mixtures. The significance of individual chemosensory genes are validated through chemosensory organ expression analyses, genetic manipulation and electrophysiological and behavioral assays.
Alexandra Wilson
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
acwilson@bio.miami.edu
Wilson Group
The Wilson Group's research focuses on the symbiosis of sap-feeding insects with their obligate intracellular bacterial symbionts. Working within an evolutionary framework they use protein expression systems and immunolocalization to functionally characterize amino acid transporters at the symbiotic interface of sap-feeding insects.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Jay Evans
Research Scientist
Bee Research Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Beltsville MD USA
jay.evans@ars.usda.gov
Bee Research Lab
We study honey bee traits linked with disease and stress resistance, and use genetic and genomic techniques to understand honey bee health as well as the virulence traits and biologics of parasites and pathogens of bees. Current projects include honey bee resistance to gut parasites, interactions among members of the bee microbiome, and genomic analyses of a key honey bee parasite, the mite Varroa destructor.
Dr. Rakesh Mishra
CV
CCMB
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad Telangana India
mishra@ccmb.res.in
Senior Principal Scientist and Group Leader
We are interested in understanding how non-coding part of the genome, including repetitive sequences, brings about cell type specific is packaging and how once this packaging established it is maintained by epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms. We use Hox gene complexes as loci in model systems, Drosophila and zebrafish, to address theses issues address evolution of complexity in animals. By analyzing the genome organization in the context of nuclear architecture we study the structural basis of cellular memory. We propose that embryonic development is setting up of functional form of genome (epigenome or cell type specific chromatin) starting from the stem cell
Yehuda Ben-Shahar
Assistant Professor
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis Missouri USA
benshahary@wustl.edu
Ben-Shahar lab at Wash U
We are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity on three major time scales: evolutionary, Developmental and Physiological. We address these questions with the powerful genetic model Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), and the emerging model for complex social behaviors, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Research approaches in the lab include behavior, genetics, genomics, molecular and cellular biology, and neurophysiology.
Claude Desplan
Professor
CV
Biology
NYU
New York New York United States
cd38@nyu.edu
Molecular Genetics
EVO-DEVO: Evolution of axis formation using the wasp Nasonia. Different strategies are used in insects to establish embryonic polarity. In the ancestral short-germ mode of development, nuclei fated to become the embryo are restricted to the posterior end of the egg while the anterior of the egg develops as extra-embryonic membranes. Only anterior segments are patterned at the syncytial blastoderm while abdominal segments form in a posterior growth zone. This system relies on a single posterior morphogenetic center whereby a localized posterior determinant (nanos) is responsible for forming gradients of factors that pattern head and thorax. In the derived long-germ
Darko Cotoras
PhD Candidate
CV
Integrative Biology
University of California, Berkeley
Berkeley California USA
darkocotoras@berkeley.edu
Evolution of terrestrial invertebrates on islands
I am interested on historical processes that create biodiversity, particularly in conditions of isolation. I am studying the temporal dynamic of the adaptive radiation of the Tetragnatha spiders in the Hawaiian archipelago. For that, I am using population genetics and phylogenetics approaches (Exon Capture -NGS- and Sanger sequencing) using fresh and museum samples. As a complement, I am also studying the color polymorphism of several species and their habitat (plant) preferences. In parallel, I am doing phylogenetic studies on endemic spiders from the Juan Fernández archipelago and characterizing the spider community of Rapa
Jeffrey Marcus
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg MB Canada
marcus@cc.umanitoba.ca
Evolutionary developmental genetics of butterflies
My research interests focus on the evolution of developmental mechanisms. My laboratory studies the genetic and developmental basis of phenotypic variation, primarily using colour pattern formation in butterflies and moths as a model system. We employ a variety of approaches in our experiments including genomics, molecular phylogenetics, transgenics, immunohistochemistry, and computational biology.
Jennifer Gleason
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS USA
jgleason@ku.edu

My lab focuses on the genetics of behavior, primarily in Drosophila. We are interested in the genetic changes resulting in behavioral isolation between species. To that end, we study courtship behaviors, primarily acoustic signals (courtship song) and pheromones.
Dominic Esposito
Director
Protein Expression Laboratory
Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research
Frederick MD USA
dom.esposito@fnlcr.nih.gov
Protein Expression Laboratory
Generation of recombinant DNA and proteins in support of the National Cancer Institute's RAS initiative.
Anthony A. James
Distinguished Professor
Micro. Molec. Genet. and Molec. Biol. Biochem.
University of California
Irvine CA USA
aajames@uci.edu

We research vector-parasite interactions, mosquito molecular biology and practical approaches to controlling vector-borne diseases. We use molecular-genetic tools to develop synthetic approaches to interrupt pathogen transmission by mosquitoes. Our group developed mosquito transgenesis procedures and engineered genes that interfere with malaria parasite development in mosquitoes. We collaborated to develop RNAi-mediated approaches to prevent dengue virus transmission and population-suppression strains based on flightless females. We use bioinformatics to study the evolution of control DNA involved in regulating genes involved in hematophagy. We have a strong interest in what it takes to move laboratory science from the laboratory to the field.
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
J. Spencer Johnston
Professor
Entomology/Genetics
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
spencerj@tamu.edu
We estimate do Genome Size Estimates for genomics projects
My primary interest is in genome size evolution and genome architecture. The Alab specializes in Arthropod genome size estimates, but routinely determinse genome size for a wide variety of organisms. We take pride in estimates that are timely, accurate and precise, and follow these estimates through to final publication of completed genomes, phylogenomic and genomic surveys. We also study population structure, working primarily on honey bees. These studies include microsatellite loci, SNPs, genomic and quantitative cytogenetics.
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Björn Brembs
Prof. Dr.
Institute of Zoology - Neurogenetics
Universität Regensburg
Regensburg Bavaria Germany
bjoern@brembs.net

We are interested in the neurobiology of spontaneous behavioral choice and operant learning.
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Joe O’Tousa
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
jotousa@nd.edu
O'Tousa Lab
My research focuses on the study of invertebrate visual systems. The Drosophila system has provided excellent molecular and genetic tools for this analysis. More recently we extended our studies to mosquito visual systems, specifically looking at mosquito retinal structure and the photoreceptor adaptations enabling vision and mosquito behaviors in low light environments.
Dayalan Srinivasan
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Rowan University
Glassboro NJ USA
srinivasan@rowan.edu

We use the pea aphid, an insect that displays several polyphenisms, as our model for understanding the genetic, epigenetic cellular basis of phenotypic plasticity as well as its evolution.
Paul Shirk
Research Physiologist
CV
Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit
USDA-ARS CMAVE
Gainesville Florida USA
paul.shirk@ars.usda.gov
Shirk Lab
The Shirk lab is currently creating the genetic and microbiological tools necessary to genetically transform obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria particularly Wolbachia. This requires modification and application of transgenic systems utilized in transgenesis of insects. We are also collaborating with other labs to achieve somatic and germline transformation of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, the varroa mite, Varroa destructor, and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella employing piggyBac vectors.
Steve Paterson
Professor
CV
Centre for Genomic Research
University of Liverpool
Liverpool Merseyside UK
s.paterson@liv.ac.uk
Centre for Genomic Research
Genomics and population genetics, particularly of host-parasite interactions. Bioinformatics, including RNAseq, de novo assembly and annotation. Sequenced Plodia interpunctella genome.
Peter Atkinson
Professor
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
peter.atkinson@ucr.edu
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
Judith Willis
Professor Emerita
Cellular Biology
University of Georgia
Athens GA USA
jhwillis@uga.edu

We study the structural cuticular proteins of Anopheles gambiae. Anopheles devotes about 2% of all its protein coding gens these proteins. We have annotated the genes, established the presence of the corresponding proteins in the cuticle with LC-MS/MS analyses. We have published expression patterns for most throughout development. Others have implicated some in insecticide resistance and in the difference between M (now An. coluzzii) and S forms. We have used in situ hybridization to learn where the genes are expressed and immunolocalization on EM sections to learn where in the cuticle the proteins are localized.
Jeffrey Scott
Professor
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
jgs5@cornell.edu

Evolution and Population Genetics of Insecticide Resistance, Insecticide Toxicology, P450 Monooxygenases of Insects, Insect Molecular Biology, Evolution of Sex Determination in Musca domestica, RNAi applications for pest control
Gregory Davis
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
Bryn Mawr College
Bryn Mawr PA USA
gdavis@brynmawr.edu
G Davis Lab at Bryn Mawr College
At Bryn Mawr College my undergraduate students and I study environmentally cued, discrete, alternate phenotypes exhibited by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. The remarkable developmental plasticity of this insect presents an opportunity to examine divergent developmental processes that are somehow directed by a single genome and cued by the environment. Our focus is the reproductive polyphenism, in which differences in day length determine whether mothers will produce daughters that reproduce either sexually by laying fertilized eggs, or asexually by allowing oocytes to complete embryogenesis within the mother without fertilization. Oocytes and embryos that are produced asexually and develop within the
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Jamie Walters
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
jrwalters@ku.edu
James R. Walters Profile
The adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Dr. Jennifer Brisson
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY United States
jbrisso3@bio.rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
genetic mapping and association mapping using Illumina data, as well as Illumina (RNA-Seq) studies; in situ hybridization of RNA to embryos, methyl-Seq
Dr. Jeffrey Stuart
Professor, Insect Molecular Genetics
faculty
Department of Entomology
Purdue University
West Lafayette IN United States
stuartjj@purdue.edu
Stuart Lab
Dr. Stuart's research is largely focused on the molecular genetics of plant-insect interactions. Currently, it is centered on understanding the mechanisms that allow plant-galling arthropods to create galls on plants and testing the hypothesis that arthropod-produced effector proteins have evolved to create the extended phenotypes we call plant galls. Toward that goal, we have been improving the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), one of the most economically important gall midges, as a genetically tractable experimental organism for studies of plant-insect interactions and arthropod-induced plant-gall formation. Recent efforts have sequenced and assembled the HF genome and ordered approximately 60% of the
Dr. Angela Douglas
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
aes326@cornell.edu
Douglas Lab
All animals are multi-organismal: they are chronically infected by beneficial microorganisms. We study the interaction between animal function and the diversity and activities of resident microorganisms.
Dr. Serap Aksoy
Professor
researcher
School of Public Health
Yale
New Haven Connecticut USA
serap.aksoy@yale.edu
Aksoy Lab
Our lab studies multiple aspects of tsetse flies, the vectors of African trypanosomes. Trypanosomes are the causative agents of the devastating Sleeping Sickness disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lab’s work spans a range of projects including tsetse immunity, reproduction and symbiosis, tsetse-symbiont and trypanosome interactions, tsetse genomics and population genetics, and trypanosome developmental processes in tsetse. The ultimate goal of our work is to improve current control methods and/or develop novel strategies to reduce or eliminate the transmission of Sleeping Sickness in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Dr. Max Scott
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
max_scott@ncsu.edu
Scott Lab
Our main interest is in developing transgenic “male-only” strains of insect pests for genetic control programs. For example, we have developed strains of flies that are pests of livestock (e.g. New World screwworm), which carry genetic systems that cause female lethality unless tetracycline is added to the diet. We are also interested in developing genetic systems for replacing mosquito populations with strains that have a reduced capacity to transmit diseases such as dengue fever. Our applied work is underpinned by fundamental research on the regulation of gene expression in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. For example, we have investigated how