Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Oliver Siehler
Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
oliver.siehler@gmx.de

Social and Neuroanatomical aspects of social entrainment
Dylan Shropshire
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN United States
dylan.shropshire@vanderbilt.edu

Endosymbiont genetics
Thanga Suja Srinivasan
Dr.
CV
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Sathyabama University, India
Chennai Tamil Nadu India
sujasree07@gmail.com
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Thanga Suja Srinivasan Researcher Plant Molecular Biology lab Sathyabama University, Chennai 06/July/2017 Research area: My research focuses on rice- planthopper interaction mechanism. Numerous resistant genes and QTL`s have been identified in rice for planthopper management. However the plant- and leafhoppers are able to adapt to the resistant genes within a few years of deployment and the exact mechanism of hopper adaptation to resistant genes is still not well known. The primary objective of the lab is to study the mechanism of hopper resistance and to develop strategies for a durable, broad spectrum and eco-friendly pest management approach. For achieving the primary goal both plant induced response
Sheina Sim
Research Biologist
CV
Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research
USDA-ARS
Hilo HI USA
ssim8@hawaii.edu

Integrating of genetic, genomic, and genome editing techniques to improve methods for tephritid fruit fly invasion pathway analysis, control, and eradication.
OLUSOLA SOKEFUN
Dr
Genetics / Bioinformatics
Lagos State University, Faculty of Science, Ojo
Lagos Lagos Nigeria
osokefun@gmail.com
Genetics / Bioinformatics Lab
Phylogeny, Barcoding, Population Genetics
Pratibha Srivastava
Biological Scientist IV
CV
Division of Plant Industry
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Gainesville Florida USA
pratibha.srivastava@freshfromflorida.com

Our goal is to increase identification capacity and strengthen detection technology, for pests of regulatory significance. Our objective is to improve all aspects of early detection technologies and resources and to develop or improve detection tests and identification capacity for species in a wide range of taxonomic groups containing high priority pests.
Erin Scully
Research Molecular Biologist
USDA-ARS
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit
Manhattan Kansas United States
Erin.Scully@ars.usda.gov

My research focuses on the functional genomics of sensory systems of stored product insects.
MUJEEB OLUSHOLA SHITTU
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Michigan Technological University
HOUGHTON Michigan United States
mshittu@mtu.edu
Werner's Lab
Studying the evolution and development of complex colour patterns in Drosophila guttifera
G Sharath Chandra
PDF
CV
Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
sharathgsc@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
RNA interference (RNAi) mediated management of Insect pests; Development of Transgenic plants for pest resistance, drought tolerance; Nutritional quality improvement.
Arvind Sharma
Post-Doctoral Associate
CV
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
reno NEVADA US
arvindsharma.phd@gmail.com

My research is focused on understanding questions related to vector ecology and use of the novel techniques to modify the genome of Ixodes scapularis
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Cheolho Sim
Associate Professor
Biology
Baylor University
Waco Texas United States
cheolho_sim@baylor.edu
Vector Biology
Currently, the Sim’s lab focuses on Vector Biology using a combination of genetic, molecular, cell biological and bioinformatical approaches. The two broad areas of work in our laboratory are (1) functional genomics studies of arthropod vectors of human pathogens and (2) diapause research on the mosquito Culex pipiens, which is the primary vector for West Nile encephalitis, Eastern equine encephalitis, and many arboviruses, as well as lymphatic filariases. Within the temperate zones, mosquitoes are limited temporally to just a few months of active development. The remaining months are spent in a dormancy period known as diapause. Depending on the species, mosquito
Glady Samuel
Entomology
Texas A&M
College Station TX USA
hsamuel@tamu.edu

Vector Borne diseases, Vector Viral Interactions, Mosquito Antiviral pathways
kanakala surapathrudu
post doctoral Research fellow
Department of Entomology
Agricultural Research Organization
Bet Dagan, Israel. Israel Israel
kanakalavit@gmail.com

RNAi
S Sundar
Dr.
Protect Our Environment Trust
Non-Governmental Organisation
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
sun76dar@yahoo.co.in

Aquatic insects in various aspects include taxonomy, systematics, ecological, biological etc. My research interests is not confined into the aspects I have worked so far it extends to focus on aquatic insects genome studies which will provide enormous insights into insect biology.Besides, investigations on aquatic insects models can provide biological insights relevant to other organisms and it would lead to important discoveries like other aquatic organisms or invertebrates in many areas of research such as immunology, neurobiology and behaviour. Using insects as models will offer many advantages, including their short life cycle, simple anatomy and cost-effectiveness due to the ease
Jacob Stewart
Molecular Biology
University of Idaho
Moscow Id United States
jakestew@mail.com
Jake Stewart
Mating compatibility systems in Basidiomycetes, yeast genetics, plant transformation, gene drive systems, selfish elements/transposons, vector insect genetics and transformation.
Joseph Sarro
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana United States
jsarro@nd.edu
Senior analyst in bioinformatics
My current research focuses on analyzing next generation sequencing for the purposes of arthropod development, cancer, and more.
Richu Singla
Regional Station
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
richu@pau.edu

Insect Molecular Biology
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Wendy Smith
Associate Professor and Interim Chair
Biology
Northeastern University
Boston MA USA
w.smith@neu.edu

Regulation of insect growth, development, and immunity
Vikas Suman
Dr.
CV
Insect Cytogenetics
GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE, NERWA
District Shimla Himachal Pradesh INDIA
viks_suman@yahoo.co.in

My research focus on cytological characterization of holocentric chromosomes in Heteropteran insetcs, using C-banding and Fluorescent staining. We identify cytological markers in different families of Heteroptera used to differentiate species which are morphological alike. Also the study help us to classify families which are alike in cytological behaviour not just of morphological characters.
Zeeshan Shaukat
Dr
CV
Genetics and Evolution
University of Adelaide
Adelaide South Australia Australia
zeeshan.shaukat@adelaide.edu.au
Gregory Lab
Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. As CIN is not found in normal cells, it offers a cancer-specific target for therapy. We generated a CIN model in Drosophila by knocking down the spindle checkpoint, and screened for candidate knockdowns that induce apoptosis only in CIN cells. Genes identified include those involved in the DNA damage/repair pathway, JNK signaling pathway, mitotic cytoskeletal regulation and metabolism. The screen demonstrates that it is feasible to selectively kill cells with CIN. CIN is linked to the
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Nagraj Sambrani
Postdoc
CV
Lab of Molecular genetics
CDFD, Hyderabad, India
Hyderabad Telengana india
loginnagraj@gmail.com
LMG
My Current Project A major challenge in developmental biology is the elucidation of how changes in patterning mechanisms have contributed to the evolution of morphology. The insect wing is a fascinating developmental system in which to study this question, because of presence of vast diversification in insect wing morphologies. The proposed research will compare
Karan Singh
PhD Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali
Mohali Punjab India
karansinghlabana1984@gmail.com
Evolutionary Biology Lab
My broad area of research interest is evolutionary genetics and host-parasite interaction. My graduate work is mainly focused on how environmental stress shapes life history traits and underlying genetic mechanisms of increased cold stress resistance. Apart from my work on cold shock resistance, I have also focused on host-parasite interaction and I isolated a novel bacterial pathogen (Staphylococcus succinus) of D. melanogaster that is now being extensively used to study evolutionary ecology of immunity.
Val Saffer
Administrative Assistant
Dr. David O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Rockville MD USA
safferv@ibbr.umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
None.
Johannes Schinko
Dr. rer. nat.
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhone-Alpes France
johannesschinko@hotmail.com

Genetic interactions during posterior elongation in short germ band insects.
Laura Sirot
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
College of Wooster
Wooster OH USA
lsirot@wooster.edu
Evolutionary and Applied Reproductive Biology
We are broadly interested in the reproductive behavior of animals, including mechanisms that males and females use to influence reproductive success. Our current research focuses on reproductive behavior and physiology in several species including: the pomace fly (Drosophila melanogaster), the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), and humans.
Tetsuro Shinoda
Division of Insect Sciences
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
shinoda@affrc.go.jp

Molecular mechanisms of juvenile hormone action
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Santosh sarathy
molecular entomology
NBAIR
Bangalore Karnataka India
santoshsarathy@gmail.com

Expression profiling for insecticide resistance
Sumeyra Sanal
PhD student
Molecular Entomology
Anadolu University
Eskisehir Tepebası Turkey
sumeyrasanal@gmail.com

Genetic and phylogeographical settlement of Tabanidae genus in the Turkey Fauna
sekhar srikakolapu
Mr.
CV
laboratory of molecular genetics
Center for DNA fingerprinting and Diagnostics
hyderabad Andhra Pradesh india
sekharsri5@gmail.com
Laboratory Of molecular genetics
Elucidation of alternative Splicing mechanism and genome editing through CRISPR Cas9 in Bombyx mori
Atef Sayed
CV
Biological control
Plant Protection Research
Ismailia Ismailia Egypt
atef.mahmoud1@gmail.com

Willing to collaborate on : - Genetic and molecular researches and biotechnological and nanotechnology approaches for the management of insect pests. - Improve pest control strategies and programs for major economic pests and crops through new applied research results. - Maximization of biological control and other relevant substitutes within the framework of IPM and environmentally safe methods.
Kimberly Stephens
Entomology
University of California - Riverside
Riverside California United States
kstep002@ucr.edu

Sperm motility and sperm-egg interactions
Molly Shook
Postdoctoral Associate
Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois
Urbana Illinois United States
mshook@illinois.edu

Epigenetics of aggression in honey bees
Mubarak Hussain Syed
Dr
University of Oregon
HHMI/Institute for neurobiology
Eugene Oregon United States
mosvey@gmail.com
Doe lab
Drosophila neural Stem cell temporal identity
DEEPAK KUMAR SINHA
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology
M.M. University, India
AMBALA HARYANA INDIA
deepak22sinha@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Entomologist
I developed deep interest in insect pest biology with regards to its interaction with host. My research area deals with understanding the molecular basis of insect-plant interactions. In this broad field, I am specially interested in insect pests of crops such as rice and wheat. I have worked on gall midge, aphids and want to focus more on yellow stem borers. I want to understand aspects of virulence of these pests and also investigate into the role of different gut bacteria in virulence.
Qi Su
Ph.D
Department of Entomology
Institute of Vegetables and Flowers, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
suqicaas@163.com

I am interested in studying the multitrophic interactions between whiteflies, especially the sweetpotato whitefly Bemisia tabaci, Begomoviruses, especially Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and bacterial endosymbionts that reside within the whiteflies. I am further interested in several aspects of ensosymbiont influence on the whitefly biology and interactions with biotic and abiotic stress.
Andrew Straw
IMP Fellow
Circuit Neuroscience
Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP)
Vienna Vienna Austria
andrew.straw@imp.ac.at
Straw Lab
The questions we address are as follows. 1) What are the identity and function of neurons and molecules required for specific behaviors? This is neural circuit mapping. 2) What are individual sub-behaviors an animal uses and how do these sub-behaviors interact? We define, rigorously quantify, and model these sub-behaviors and their interactions with ideas from control theory, Bayesian inference and cognitive science. This is systems behavior. 3) We want to connect these levels of understanding into a mapping that lets us traverse from neuronal implementation to computational task and behavioral context in a rigorous way. Ultimately, we aim to link
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Alekos Simoni
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London London United Kingdom
a.simoni@imperial.ac.uk

Applying state of the art molecular biology to vector control with the aim of reducing malaria transmission
Hideki Sezutsu
Head
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
hsezutsu@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research lab
We are developing transgenic silkworms for fundamental research and applications. Our aims are to understand insect functions and evolution, in addition to design the insects for the creation of new insect-industries.
William Stumph
Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
San Diego State University
San Diego CA USA
wstumph@mail.sdsu.edu

My lab studies the formation of RNA polymerase II and RNA polymerase III transcription pre-initiation complexes on genes that code for the small nuclear RNAs (U1-U6). We are interested in the molecular mechanisms that determine the RNA polymerase specificity of these genes (Pol II on U1-U5 versus Pol III on U6). We particularly study the snRNA gene-specific transcription factor SNAPc that binds about 40 to 60 base pairs upstream of both classes of genes.
Gulsaz Shamim
CV
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
gulsazshamim@gmail.com
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
Liang Sun
Tea cultivation and pest control
Tea Research Institution, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science
Hangzhou Zhejiang China
liangsun1029@126.com

Molecular and cellular mechanism of insect olfactory detection
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
Giuseppe Saccone
PhD, Assist. Professor
Department of Biology
University Federico II of Naples
Naples Italy Italy
giuseppe.saccone@unina.it
Sex Evo Devo
Evolution of sex determining genes and networks in dipteran species of economic or medical relevance. Molecular entomology and Insect Biotechnology. We have uncovered in the mediterranean fruitly Ceratitis capitata a key epigenetic gene for female sex determination, Cctra(ep), which has an additional autoregulatory function compared to the Drosophila tra orthologue, which lost it. In Ceratitis, as in Drosophila, Cctra(ep) controls the splicing of the downstream doublex and fruitless genes. We and others have found that this evolutionary version of transformer(ep) is a master gene for female sex determination widely conserved in Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera. We have developed a
Marla Sokolowski
University Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto
Toronto Ontario Canada
marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca
Sokolowski Lab: Genes, Environment and Behaviour
We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences (gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect behavior. Experiential affects, like developmental ones can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but
Cynthia Staber
Sr. Laboratory Manager
Zeitlinger Lab
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Kansas City MO USA
cst@stowers.org
Zeitlinger Lab
I have worked on Segregation Distorter for many years and now work on regulation of developmental timing in the Drosophila embryo.
Steve Stowers
Assistant professor
Cell Biology and Neuroscience
Montana State University
Bozeman Montana United States
sstowers@montana.edu

How sensory information is processed by the nervous system to produce behavioral outputs is a long-standing problem in neuroscience, but one far from being understood. My lab exploits the many advantages of the Drosophila model system to study the relationship between somatosensory input and behavior. Our overall strategy is to first map neural circuits associated with specific somatosensory neurons and then manipulate and measure neuronal activity within the circuit to elucidate the fundamental principles of neuronal circuit logic. Since the depth with which a neural circuit will be understood will correlate with the precision with which it can be manipulated, we
Maria Cristina Silva
PhD.
CV
Biotechniology
Embrapa Genetic Resource and Biotechnology
Brasilia DF BRAZIL
cristina.mattar@embrapa.br
Plant Pest Molecular Interaction
Specialist in plant molecular biology, works in the area of plant biotechnology aimed at resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Undertakes research focusing on the following themes: Evolution of molecules in vitro selection of variants with improved activity, molecular interaction studies aiming to plant pest resistance to insects.
Jonas Schwirz
Project Group Bioresources
Fraunhofer IME
Giessen Hessen Germany
jonas.schwirz@ime.fraunhofer.de

Drosophila genetics and transgenesis
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Alimorad Sarafrazi
Dr
CV
Insect Taxonomy Research Department
Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection
Tehran Tehran/Asia Iran
asarafrazi@yahoo.com
Heteroptera
I'm working on the taxoxnomy of Heteroptera based on morphological and molecular characters. I have also working on the population Genetics of these taxa. Recently I have conducted some works on phyloclimatics of Heteroptera combining the genetic structure and distribution modeling
Luc Swevers
Dr
Biosciences & Applications
NCSR "Demokritos"
Aghia Paraskevi (Athens) Attiki Greece
swevers@bio.demokritos.gr
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
1) Molecular analysis of the developmental program that directs follicular cell differentiation during oogenesis in silkmoths : in vitro culture of ovarioles, molecular analysis of ecdysone response, analysis of transcription factor function, functional analysis of the nuclear receptor BmE75 during the transition from vitellogenesis to choriogenesis. 2) Analysis of small RNA pathways in lepidopteran insects: the RNA-binding proteins R2D2 and Translin. Development of methods to increase the efficiency of RNAi in lepidopteran insects. 3) Development of methods for control of insect pests: development of baculoviruses as transformation vectors, exploration of transposable elements for insect transformation, environmental RNAi, insect growth regulators. 4)
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Daniel Sonenshine
Professor (Emeritus)
Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk Virginia United States
dsonensh@odu.edu
Tick Lab
Neurobiology of ticks; transcriptomics; neuropeptides, neurotransmitters; tick-borne pathogens; innate immunity; pheromones.
Christina Schulte
CV
Heinrich-Heine University
Evolutionary Genetics
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
christina-schulte@gmx.de

Honeybee workers show altruistic behaviors in contrast to queens and drones, which show behaviors that are related to reproduction. The collective behaviors of the worker bees produce group phenotypes that allow them to remain well-adapted in a changing environment. These worker specific behaviors have been largely described but we have little understanding of the molecular control that specifies these behaviors in the brain during development, and of its evolution that gave rise to social behaviors during the last 60 million years. Differentiation of the worker brain is specified by female- and caste-determining signals. The sex-determining signal is implemented by Feminizer protein
Jackson Sparks
Postdoctoral Research Entomologist
Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Lab
ARS-USDA
Beltsville MD USA
jackson.sparks@ars.usda.gov

Our research is aimed at characterizing the molecular components of the mosquito chemosensory repertoire. Our mission is to deliver methods to identify novel repellents or repellent blends. We hope to identify all major molecular classes susceptible to repellent effects in order to screen novel compounds or mixtures. The significance of individual chemosensory genes are validated through chemosensory organ expression analyses, genetic manipulation and electrophysiological and behavioral assays.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Dayalan Srinivasan
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Rowan University
Glassboro NJ USA
srinivasan@rowan.edu

We use the pea aphid, an insect that displays several polyphenisms, as our model for understanding the genetic, epigenetic cellular basis of phenotypic plasticity as well as its evolution.
Paul Shirk
Research Physiologist
CV
Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit
USDA-ARS CMAVE
Gainesville Florida USA
paul.shirk@ars.usda.gov
Shirk Lab
The Shirk lab is currently creating the genetic and microbiological tools necessary to genetically transform obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria particularly Wolbachia. This requires modification and application of transgenic systems utilized in transgenesis of insects. We are also collaborating with other labs to achieve somatic and germline transformation of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, the varroa mite, Varroa destructor, and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella employing piggyBac vectors.
Jeffrey Scott
Professor
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
jgs5@cornell.edu

Evolution and Population Genetics of Insecticide Resistance, Insecticide Toxicology, P450 Monooxygenases of Insects, Insect Molecular Biology, Evolution of Sex Determination in Musca domestica, RNAi applications for pest control
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Jeffrey Stuart
Professor, Insect Molecular Genetics
faculty
Department of Entomology
Purdue University
West Lafayette IN United States
stuartjj@purdue.edu
Stuart Lab
Dr. Stuart's research is largely focused on the molecular genetics of plant-insect interactions. Currently, it is centered on understanding the mechanisms that allow plant-galling arthropods to create galls on plants and testing the hypothesis that arthropod-produced effector proteins have evolved to create the extended phenotypes we call plant galls. Toward that goal, we have been improving the Hessian fly (HF, Mayetiola destructor), one of the most economically important gall midges, as a genetically tractable experimental organism for studies of plant-insect interactions and arthropod-induced plant-gall formation. Recent efforts have sequenced and assembled the HF genome and ordered approximately 60% of the
Dr. Max Scott
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
max_scott@ncsu.edu
Scott Lab
Our main interest is in developing transgenic “male-only” strains of insect pests for genetic control programs. For example, we have developed strains of flies that are pests of livestock (e.g. New World screwworm), which carry genetic systems that cause female lethality unless tetracycline is added to the diet. We are also interested in developing genetic systems for replacing mosquito populations with strains that have a reduced capacity to transmit diseases such as dengue fever. Our applied work is underpinned by fundamental research on the regulation of gene expression in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. For example, we have investigated how