Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Michael Smanski
Assistant Professor
Department of Biochem, Mol Biol, and Biophys and the Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St Paul MN USA
smanski@umn.edu

Our group has developed novel strategies to control gene flow between engineered and wild populations.
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
chithravel vadivalagan
Molecular Entomology, Pest and Parasites Insects
CV
Zoology
Bharathiar University
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
marinedrug.9@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
My field of interest includes Molecular Ecology, Evolutionary genetics of vector born diseases and their potential vectors control by using biosynthesized Nanoparticles. I am much interested in Genomics of pest, parasites and novel haplotype variations for adaptive radiation of vector born diseases
Kaylen Brzezinski
Department of Biology
Carleton University
Ottawa Ontario Canada
kaylenbrzezinski@cmail.carleton.ca
MacMillan Lab
My research focuses on how temperature (mainly cold stress) affects paracellular barrier permeability in gut epithelia.
LI TIAN
Ph.D
Biology
Penn State University
University Park PA United States
lzt22@psu.edu
Hines Lab
Evolutionary developmental biology of mimetic coloration in bumblebee
Andrew Guinness
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
aguinnes@nd.edu

Broadly, I am interested in molecular signalling and transgenic targets in insect vectors, most specifically applied to mosquitoes.
David Arnosti
Professor
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Michigan State University
East Lansing MI USA
arnosti@msu.edu

Our research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in the context of Drosophila development. We utilize genetic and molecular biological approaches to study the role of enhancers in regulation of signaling and patterning circuits, including insulin signaling, retinoblastoma-mediated control of growth related genes, and chromatin-modulating complexes important for development. Evolutionary perspectives lead us to consider how these processes are active in non-model insects, as well as vertebrates.
Rocio Elisa Yanes Ruano
CV
MOSCAMED
Guatemala Department of Agriculture
San Miguel Petapa Guatemala Guatemala
reyr66@gmail.com
San miguel Petapa Facilities
Anastrepha Ludens Ceratitis Capitata
David Kang
Postdoctoral Fellow
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN United States
dkang3@nd.edu
Severson Laboratory
I investigate the impact of stressors on Aedes aegypti mosquito susceptibility to arboviruses. Ultimately, my overarching goal is to capitalize on genetic variation to reduce the transmission of neglected tropical diseases.
Xu Wang
Assistant Professor
Pathobiology
Auburn University
Auburn University AL United States
xzw0070@auburn.edu

Genomics, Epigenomics, Microbiome, Evolution, Gene Expression
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Junesun Yoon
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
june.yoon@uky.edu
Palli Lab at U of Kentucky
RNA interference (RNAi) is a useful reverse genetic tools for investigating the gene function. Moreover, RNAi also has potential practical applications in many fields including medicine and agriculture. The variability in RNAi efficacy among insect species limits the range of its application. I am trying to understand the mechanism of RNA interference in insects to facilitate the use of RNAi to control pests. I study coleopteran insects to understand how/why RNAi works well as successful RNAi models and lepidopteran insects to investigate the barriers for efficient RNAi.
Matthew Edgington
Dr
Artropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
matt.edgington@pirbright.ac.uk

Mainly working on mathematical modelling of engineered underdominance gene drive systems in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes but also some other classes of gene drive.
Antonis Giakountis
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larisa Larisa Greece
agiakountis@uth.gr
Molecular Biology and Genomics
long non-coding RNAs, chromatin architecture, epigenomics, transcriptional regulation, development
Andrew Nuss
Assistant Professor
Agriculture, Nutrition, and Veterinary Science
University of Nevada Reno
Reno Nevada United States of America
nuss@cabnr.unr.edu
Nuss Lab
My research interests mainly are focused on the physiology of neurohormonal signaling in insects of agricultural, medical, and veterinary importance. I am particularly interested in peptide hormones of the gut and their role in insect behavior, digestion, and nutrient storage. Projects include insecticide discovery by targeting peptide receptors and physiological functions of peptide hormones produced in the insect gut and nervous system. I am also interested in mosquito olfaction and the factors that allow certain species to discriminate between feeding on humans and other animals.
jacinta chuang
Sr. reseatch scientist
biochemistry
ut southwestern med ctr
dallas tx usa
jacinta.chuang@utsouthwestern.edu

metabolic diseases
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Thanga Suja Srinivasan
Dr.
CV
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Sathyabama University, India
Chennai Tamil Nadu India
sujasree07@gmail.com
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Thanga Suja Srinivasan Researcher Plant Molecular Biology lab Sathyabama University, Chennai 06/July/2017 Research area: My research focuses on rice- planthopper interaction mechanism. Numerous resistant genes and QTL`s have been identified in rice for planthopper management. However the plant- and leafhoppers are able to adapt to the resistant genes within a few years of deployment and the exact mechanism of hopper adaptation to resistant genes is still not well known. The primary objective of the lab is to study the mechanism of hopper resistance and to develop strategies for a durable, broad spectrum and eco-friendly pest management approach. For achieving the primary goal both plant induced response
Adam CN Wong
Assistant Professor
Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
adamcnwong@ufl.edu

Our laboratory is broadly interested in insect-microbe interactions that span the areas of symbiosis, pathogenesis, metabolism, nutrition and behavior. A major theme is to integrate omics, molecular and ecological approaches to better understand how the gut microbiome modulates insect physiological responses to changing environment and the virulence mechanisms of gut pathogens. We use Drosophila as our primary research model with the goal of translating into agriculturally- and medically-important insects for novel management strategies.
Mamidala Praveen
Associate Professor
CV
Biotechnology
Telangana University
Nizamabad Telangana India
pmamidala@gmail.com
Laboratory of Functional Genomics
Functional genomics in non-model organisms
Atif Manzoor
Assistant Professor (IPFP, HEC)
Agricultural Biotechnology Division
National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Pujnab Pakistan
atif1903@yahoo.com

My basic research interests are the proteomic and transcriptomic studies of parasitoid venoms and isolation of bioactive genes present in the venom glands.
Ritesh Jain
Plant Science
University of Queensland
Brisbane  QLD Australia
r.jain1@uq.edu.au

RNAi mediated control of Lepidopteran insect.
Austin Compton
Biochemistry
Virginia Tech
Newport Virginia United States
austc14@vt.edu

I am interested in delineating the biological mechanism of sex determination in different Anopheles mosquitoes by characterizing the role of male-determining (M) factors.
Nicole Gutzmann
Graduate Student
Entomology
NCSU
Raleigh NC United States
negutzma@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
Functional and social analysis of pest management technologies and their development
SALMAN KHAN
PhD RESEARCH SCHOLAR
FOREST ENTOMOLOGY DIVISION
FOREST RESEARCH INSTITUTE DEHRADUN
DEHRADUN UTTARAKHAND INDIA
salman1315@gmail.com

BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF FOREST INSECT PESTS; TAXONOMY OF MICRO-HYMENOPTERA; MORPHOMETRICS OF INSECTS; IDENTIFICATION OF NATURAL ENEMY OF FOREST TREES
OLUSOLA SOKEFUN
Dr
Genetics / Bioinformatics
Lagos State University, Faculty of Science, Ojo
Lagos Lagos Nigeria
osokefun@gmail.com
Genetics / Bioinformatics Lab
Phylogeny, Barcoding, Population Genetics
Bianca Kojin
Post-doctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
bianca.burini@gmail.com

Genetic transmission of engineered transgenes.
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
ikbal agah ince
School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology
ACIBADEM UNIVERSITY
İstanbul Atasehir TURKEY
agah.ince@acibadem.edu.tr
INCE Research Group / MBT / EPIMARK
I focus on understanding of the complexity of microbe-host interactions applying system biology approaches to provide the scientific basis for the development of novel bio-strategies and designing of bio-processes of products of a wide spectrum of interest in bio-industry. Fundamental/Applied Research Lines; - Detection of pathogen signals in complex biological samples using well established model organisms (in Human, Drosophila, Tsetse, Mosquito. - Manipulation of the host (vector) microbiota to block transmission of pathogens.
Kai-Shu Ling
Research Plant Pathologist
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Charleston SC USA
kai.ling@ars.usda.gov

Study virus-vector interactions, epidemiology and management of insect-transmitted viral diseases, particularly whitefly-transmitted viruses in plants.
Ibrahim Elsheshney
Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Economic Entomology
Plant Protection (Economic Entomology)
Tanta University, Egypt
Tanta Gharbeya Egypt
ishento@yahoo.com

• Investigating innovative methods of insect pest control such as CRISPR, RNAi, Bt … etc. • Studying insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry in -omics levels. • Exploring insect resistance, immunological and development. • Understanding Ecological and multi-trophic interactions (plant-pathogen-insect-symbionts-natural enemies) in the ecosystem and microbial Ecology of insects. • IPM and Biological control of Horticulture and vegetable Insect Pests • Nanotechnology applications in pest control
Silvia Lanzavecchia
Doctor in Science
CV
Genetics Institute
National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA)
HURLINGHAM BUENOS AIRES ARGENTINA
lanzavecchia.silvia@inta.gob.ar
LABORATORIO DE GENETICA DE INSECTOS DE IMPORTANCIA ECONÓMICA
Our scientific lines of research are focused on insect genetics, population genetics, application of molecular markers and the study of genes involved in physiological and behavioral processes. Our activities are associated to the development of environmentally-friendly control strategies against the most economically important insect pests and molecular characterization of beneficial insects.
Andrew Legan
PhD student
Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University
Ithaca New York United States
awl75@cornell.edu
Sheehan Lab
I am interested in major evolutionary transitions in individuality, such as the evolution of eusociality. As a graduate student, I study the primitively eusocial wasp genus Polistes, and I aim to describe the neurobiological and genomic mechanisms of chemosensation and their relevance to communication. By using a functional genetic approach in multiple paper wasp species, I hope to alter the production and perception of chemical signals in order to shed light on the function of chemical communication in social recognition, mating, and development.
Ramkumar Govindaraju
Dr
Biotechnology
Periyar University, Salem, TN, India
Salem Tamil Nadu India
rkentomology@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Toxicology Laboratory
My research is concerned with the biochemical, molecular and proteomic study in the evolution of Insecticide resistance among mosquitoes and to identify novel molecules for insect control. My work includes molecular and proteomic analysis, in addition to understanding the gene expression pattern of detoxification enzymes. Mainly my research focuses on the role of cytochrome P450 and esterase genes in conferring insecticides resistance in mosquitoes and agricultural insects.
Narender Dhania
M.Sc.
CV
Department of Animal Biology
School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad
Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh India
warlock.naren@gmail.com

Assessment of midgut regeneration in lepidopteran larvae upon Cry toxin intoxication.
Iliya Ndams
Prof.
Department of Zoology
Ahmadu Bello University Zaria
Zaria Kaduna State Nigeria
isndams@abu.edu.ng
Parasitology/Entomology Research Laboratory
Ecology and control of mosquitoes, tseste fly, blackfly, sandfly
Travis van Warmerdam
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entemology and Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS United States
tcv34@msstate.edu
King Lab
I am interested in developing transgenic methods for the manipulation of invertebrate genomes. I am currently developing a gene drive plasmid in a Coleopteran species.
Samuel Arsenault
Mr.
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States of America
sva@uga.edu
Brendan G. Hunt: Evolutionary Insect Genetics Lab
My research focusses on understanding the genetic and epigenetic underpinnings of social polymorphism in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. We seek to understand which genetic and behavioral cues maintain the colony structures of these organisms in their North American range. Additionally, we implement a phylogenetics-based approach for understanding the evolution of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in Hymenoptera.
Olena Riabinina
MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
Imperial College London
London London UK
oriabinina@gmail.com

I am interested in sensory neuroscience and genetics. I have introduced the Q-system into A. gambiae to study olfactory processing in these mosquitoes. I also play around with flies.
Wiem BEN AMARA
Biology
Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar
Tunis El Manar Tunisia
wiem.benamara7@gmail.com
Unité de recherche de génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures
study of transposable elements in insects
Jonas King
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, & Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State MS USA
jonas.king@msstate.edu
kinglab
http://kinglab.bch.msstate.edu/research.html
AKASHATA DAWANE
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
GBPUAT PANTNAGAR
NAGPUR MAHARASHTRA INDIA
dawaneakshata@gmail.com

I AM NOT DOING RESEARCH YET BUT VERY INTERESTED IN ENTOMOLOGY AND INSECT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND LOOK FORWARD TO BE A PART OF IT
Steve Young
School of Integrative Plant Science
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
sly27@cornell.edu

Invasive pests
Pratima Chennuri
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX USA
pratima.chennuri@live.co.uk

Gene Drives.
Flávia Virginio Fonseca
Biologist, PhD. candidate
CV
Paarasitology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo Sao Paulo Brazil
fvfonsecaa@gmail.com

Scientific Dissemination, Scientific Diffusion, Science Popularization, Community Engagement, Public Engagement.
G Sharath Chandra
PDF
CV
Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
sharathgsc@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
RNA interference (RNAi) mediated management of Insect pests; Development of Transgenic plants for pest resistance, drought tolerance; Nutritional quality improvement.
Syed Hasan Zarain shah Naqvi
Student
CV
Entomology
UAF
nankana sahib punjab, pakistan pakistan
zarain_166@yahoo.com

Insect molecular biology and genetics. IPM. Rearing Techniques for different insect pests like Helicoverpa armigera, Pieris brasicae in Laboratory LABORATORY STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF GLYCOGEN, TOTAL SUGAR AND LIPID LEVELS OF ECTO PARASITOID BRACON HEBETOR (SAY.) (HYMENOPTERA: BRACONIDAE)
Dave Angelini
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Colby College
Waterville Maine United States
david.r.angelini@gmail.com

I am particularly interested in developmental genetic systems with alternative phenotypic outcomes, such as serially homologous, dimorphic and polyphenic traits. While my immediate research focuses on the mechanisms of these systems, my lab also uses a comparative approach to explore their evolution. Insect appendages are my most common study systems, where I use a combination of methods from functional genetics, morphometrics, endocrinology and genomics.
Anna Buchman
Project Scientist
Department of Entomology
UC Riverside
Riverside CA USA
annabuch@ucr.edu
Akbari Lab
I am currently working to develop replacement and suppression gene drive systems in fruit flies and mosquitoes.
Pinky Kain Sharma
Principal investigator (Wellcome Trust DBT intermediate Fellow)
Department of Genetics and Neurobiology
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, India
Faridabad Haryana India
pinkykain@gmail.com
Laboratory of Genetics and Neurobiology
For any animal, learning about food is an important mechanism that provide animals flexibility in food choices for better survival, hence, it is extremely important to understand how the taste information is represented in the brain.I am interested in understanding how insects make the feeding decisions. This involves identifying neuronal taste circuits in the brain downstream of gustatory sensory neurons that influence feeding behaviors. Physiological state and other factors can act on the gustatory cells and circuits and can modulate taste signals, but these are not well understood in insects. Using Drosophila melanogaster, I will explore into these mechanisms for greater understanding
Rubina Chongtham
Botany
University of Delhi
Delhi Delhi India
chrubina1@yahoo.co.in

Aphids are important crop pests. Understanding plant-aphid interactions can give great insights into not only aphid biology, but also methods of crop-protection. My focus is on using transcriptomics and functional genomics in order to develop improved plant variety using RNAi.
Gaël Le Trionnaire
Research Scientist
Plant health and protection
INRA, France
Le Rheu Brittany France
gael.le-trionnaire@inra.fr
Ecology and Genetic of Insects
Functional Genomics in Aphids
Nahid Borhani Dizaji
Post doc fellow
molecular microbiology and immunology
Johns Hopkins University , School of public health
Baltimore MD United States
nborhan1@jhu.edu

my focus interest is on different aspects of vector biology like mosquito-pathogen interactions and dissection of mosquito immunity to Plasmodium and dengue virus infection with emphasis on developing novel strategies against mosquito born disease vectors. As a current post doc fellow I am working on generating of transgenic mosquitoes.
Olawale Adeyinka
Molecular Biology, CEMB
University of Punjab, Pakistan
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
adeyinka.olawale@gmail.com
Seed Biotechnology
to develop a biotechnology technique that would be efficient to transform Africa indigenous crop against insect pest
Heath Blackmon
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
coleoguy@gmail.com

I am interested in chromosome evolution, specifically, sex chromosome and chromosome number evolution. To address these topics, I use a broad range of approaches including theoretical population genetics, applied phylogenetics, and bioinformatics.
Monika Gulia-Nuss
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
RENO Nevada USA
mgulianuss@unr.edu
Vector Biology Lab
My research program investigates the fundamental questions related to vector biology and vector-parasite interactions. I am particularly interested in aspects of reproductive physiology, nutrient allocation, vector competence, and population genomics.
Elizabeth Brandt
Entomology
University of Maryland
Potomac MD USA
brandte13@gmail.com

Metabolic detox pathways of insects
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Mateus Berni
Institute of Biomedical Sciences
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
mateusberni@yahoo.com.br
Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento
Developmental Biology in Rhodnius prolixus
pradeep bhongale
AGROCHEMICALS AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY. KOLHAPUR
KOLHAPUR MAHARASTRA INDIA
pradeepbhongale1993@gmail.com

DNA BARCODING FOR PEST IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT
Aniruddha Pandit
Mr
College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences
University of Glasgow
Glasgow Scotland United Kingdom
Aniruddha.Pandit@glasgow.ac.uk

Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, Pest Management, Entomology
Lewis Hun
Lewis Hun M.S
CV
Entomology and Insect Science
University of Arizona
Tucson AZ United States
Lewisvibulhun@email.arizona.edu
The Riehle Lab
I'm interested in new strategies for controlling mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit. Malaria is one of the leading causes of death from infectious diseases worldwide. The mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi is a major vector of the causative Plasmodium agents in India. Due to emerging challenges such as drug resistance in Plasmodium and insecticide resistance in the mosquito, there is an increasing need for novel malaria control strategies. Malaria parasites must develop for up to two weeks in the mosquito, and conceptually, this development can be disrupted by enhancing mosquito innate immunity or by shortening the mosquito's lifespan. The insulin/IGF-1 signaling
Sonja Lindner
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
sonja.lindner@uni-goettingen.de

My aim is to study the RNAi process in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and to apply results to agricultural insect pests.
Andrew Hammond
Research Associate
Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London Greater London United Kingdom
andrew.hammond08@imperial.ac.uk
Crisanti Lab
Gene drives in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae
Alison Gerken
Post Doctoral Researcher
Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
USDA ARS
Manhattan Kansas United States
alison.gerken@ars.usda.gov

My research focus is on functional genomics of sensory systems in stored grain insect pests. I'm interested in the applied aspects of understanding what attracts insects to stored grain and how we can intercept them. I'm interested in the genetic variation underlying behavioral components associated with attraction to stored grain.
mona jahani
Ghent University
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
monajahani@gmail.com

Using RNAi technique for investigating the functional genomics and its efficiency for controlling insects
S Sundar
Dr.
Protect Our Environment Trust
Non-Governmental Organisation
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
sun76dar@yahoo.co.in

Aquatic insects in various aspects include taxonomy, systematics, ecological, biological etc. My research interests is not confined into the aspects I have worked so far it extends to focus on aquatic insects genome studies which will provide enormous insights into insect biology.Besides, investigations on aquatic insects models can provide biological insights relevant to other organisms and it would lead to important discoveries like other aquatic organisms or invertebrates in many areas of research such as immunology, neurobiology and behaviour. Using insects as models will offer many advantages, including their short life cycle, simple anatomy and cost-effectiveness due to the ease
Ronny Rosner
Institute of Neuroscience
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne England,  United Kingdom
ronny.rosner@ncl.ac.uk

I am neurophysiologist and am working on stereoscopic vision in the praying mantis.
Anja Pen
MSc.
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Aarhus University
Tjele Region Midt-Jylland Danmark
anja.pen@mbg.au.dk
Section for Molecular Genetics and Systems Biology
I am studying the effects of RNA on epigenetic marks in caste development of honey bees.
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
John Beckmann
Dr.
CV
Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Yale University
New Haven Connecticut USA
john.beckmann@yale.edu

I study the molecular mechanism of Wolbachia induced cytoplasmic incompatibility in insects. With respect to this I seek to develop transgenes that will be effective genetic units for induction of sterility and application of the sterile insect technique.
Jacob Vinay Vikas Konakondla
Fly Facility
National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR
Bangalore Karnataka India
kjvinayvikas@outlook.com
Fly Facility In-charge
Our facility provides services to the Drosophila researchers in the areas of transgenic generation by P-element, PhiC31 mediated, MiMIC methods. Our facility also carries of developmental work towards enabling modern genome editing technologies including CRISPR/Cas9 in Drosophila.
Richard Fandino
Dr.
Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thueringen Germany
rfandino@ice.mpg.de

My interest is mainly focused on the evolution of gene regulation and expression in chemosensory genes and the role these play in odor-guided behavior of insects. My post-doctoral studies are focused on establishing the ecological model, the sphinx moth, Manduca sexta as a feasible molecular model for receptor / odorant interactions.
Allison Hansen
Department of Entomology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois United States
akh@illinois.edu
Hansen Lab
The main focus of my research laboratory is to investigate host-symbiont interactions between sap-sucking insects (e.g., psyllids, whiteflies, scale insects) and their ancient obligate bacterial symbionts, because of their highly co-evolved and shared amino acid metabolisms. Due to genome-enabled sequencing technology, the regulation of this co-evolved amino-acid symbiosis is an emerging area of research in these unculturable microbe-insect systems.
Sheng Yang
Dr.
CV
School of Biological & Biomedical Sciences
Durham University (UK)
Iowa State University (USA)
Ames Iowa USA
yunfeiyangaini@126.com
Post-doc Research Associate
(1) Bt toxin engineering for novel hemipteran gut target sites Bt toxins have been successfully used in various transgenic crops for almost 20 years to manage lepidopteran and coleopteran pests. However, this strategy has not been used in the management of aphids and other hemipterans due to their low susceptibility to Bt toxins, potentially arising from a lack of binding to the hemipteran gut. To circumvent this limitation in pea aphids, peach-potato aphids and soybean aphids, a phage display library was screened in vivo against the aphid guts to identify candidate gut-binding peptides to add to a Bt toxin. The in
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Stephen Panossian
Laboratory Animal Technician Assistant
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Silver Spring Maryland United States of America
stephenpanossian@gmail.com
Insect Transformation Facility
Supporting host-pathogen interaction (mosquito-Plasmodium) research.
Richu Singla
Regional Station
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
richu@pau.edu

Insect Molecular Biology
Azza Elgendy
CV
Entomology Department
Faculty of Science, Cairo University
Giza Non-US/Non-Canadian Egypt
aelgendy@sci.cu.edu.eg

Medical entomology
Ines Elena Martin-Martin
Postdoc Visiting Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratoy of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/National Institutes of Health
Rockville Maryland United States
ines.martin-martin@nih.gov

My research focuses on the study of insect's salivary proteins and their relationship with blood-feeding process and transmission of vector-borne pathogens.
Alok Arun
Assistant Professor
Institute of Sustainable Biotechnology
Inter American University of Puerto Rico
Barranquitas Puerto Rico USA
aloktransgenic@gmail.com

I am interested in understanding the genetic mechanisms that regulate sex-pheromone biosynthesis in butterflies.
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Michelle Anderson
Lab Manager
CV
Fralin Life Science Institute and Department of Entomology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg VA USA
manderson@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in our laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Kolja Neil Eckermann
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
keckerm1@uni-goettingen.de

Development of new environmental friendly methods and techniques to improve pest and disease vector control.
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Dan Hahn
Associate Professor
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville FL USA
dahahn@ufl.edu

ecological and evolutionary physiology, physiological and genetic architecture of adaptation, applications of stress biology to biological control
Kumaresan Ramanathan
Associate Professor
CV
Biochemistry Unit,Institute of Biomedical Science,College of Health Sciences
Mekelle University (Ayder Campus)
Mekelle Tigray Region Ethiopia
kumaresanramanatha@gmail.com
Biomarkers Research Lab
1. Study on Regulation of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Metabolism using PCSK9 Gene Silencing Initially we have done this study in computational approach and the results were quite interesting. Background & Aim: With nearly 32.4 million people are affected every year with Myocardial infarction (MI), Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) and strokes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to abnormal lipid metabolism. Combating and preventing abnormality in lipid metabolism becomes a pivotal criteria for research. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulating protein, it promotes the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL-R) and hence increases LDL-C levels. Mutations that block the
Vikas Suman
Dr.
CV
Insect Cytogenetics
GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE, NERWA
District Shimla Himachal Pradesh INDIA
viks_suman@yahoo.co.in

My research focus on cytological characterization of holocentric chromosomes in Heteropteran insetcs, using C-banding and Fluorescent staining. We identify cytological markers in different families of Heteroptera used to differentiate species which are morphological alike. Also the study help us to classify families which are alike in cytological behaviour not just of morphological characters.
Philipp Brand
MSc
CV
Department of Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA USA
pbrand@ucdavis.edu
Ramirez Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested in the evolution of insect chemosensory systems and its impact on speciation processes. I am currently working with Santiago Ramirez at the Center for Population Biology at UC Davis as a PhD candidate in the PopBio Graduate Group (Cohort of 2013/2014). My research focuses on the evolution of chemical communication systems in the charismatic group of orchid bees. By integrating molecular genomic, chemical and functional neurophysiological analyses in a population biological framework, I am studying how pheromone communication systems evolve.
Sherry Adrianos
Research Molecular Biologist
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit (SPIERU)
USDA ARS
Manhattan KS USA
7SherryA@gmail.com
Oppert Lab
We are utilizing CRISPR/Cas technology with a goal to control coleopteran storage pests. Tribolium castaneum genes critical for survival are being targeted. These methodologies will be transferred to other stored product pests.
Linlin Zhang
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University
ithaca New York United States
gemzhanglinlin@gmail.com
Reed Lab
butterfly color pattern mechanism and evolution
Isobel Ronai
CV
School of Biological Sciences
The University of Sydney
Sydney NSW Australia
isobel.ronai@sydney.edu.au
Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory
My Ph.D. project is on the genetic and mechanistic basis of worker sterility in the honey bee.
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
SONAI RAJAN THANGARAJ
Dr
Agricultural Entomology
Tamil Nadu Agriculture University
Coimbatore  Tamil Nadu  India
snraja_insect@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Ecology Lab, Department of Plant Biotechnology, Centre for Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Population genetics of stored grain insect pests and honey bees Transcriptome Analaysis
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Ying Yan
Dr.
Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology (IME), Gießen, Germany
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen, Germany
Giessen Hessen Germany
yyan3@ncsu.edu
Dr.Marc Schetelig's lab
Genetic pest management
Ewan Richardson
Mr
Biochemistry and Crop Protection
Rothamsted
Brighton Sussex United Kingdom
ewan.richardson@rothamsted.ac.uk

I study the mutations underlying resistance to Diamide insecticides amongst moths. Much of my work revolves around structural study of the Ryanodine Receptor, a calcium channel of major importance in all animals. I use transgenesis to explore the impact of Ryanodine Receptor mutations on pesticide resistance in moths, and to determine whether the same effects can be established in other insect orders.
Erica Lindroth
Testing and Evaluation
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
Jacksonville Florida USA
erica.j.lindroth.mil@mail.mil

My research focuses on the development and evaluation of vector control technology for military use.
Girish Neelakanta
Assistant Professor (tenure-track)
Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk VA USA
gneelaka@odu.edu
Neelakanta Lab
My laboratory studies host-microbe interactions at the molecular level. Current focus is to understand interactions of vector-borne pathogens with their arthropod vectors (both hard and soft ticks) and their mammalian hosts. In addition, we study several aspects of vector biology in terms of understanding arthropod feeding, behavior to environment stimuli and symbiosis with microbes. We use combination of genetics, molecular biology, genomics, immunology, cell biology and microbiology approaches to decipher important aspects of these interactions.
Patricia Pietrantonio
Professor and AgriLife Research Fellow
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station  TX USA
p-pietrantonio@tamu.edu
Insect Toxicology and Physiology
Insect and tick endocrinology with emphasis in G protein-coupled receptors
Nagraj Sambrani
Postdoc
CV
Lab of Molecular genetics
CDFD, Hyderabad, India
Hyderabad Telengana india
loginnagraj@gmail.com
LMG
My Current Project A major challenge in developmental biology is the elucidation of how changes in patterning mechanisms have contributed to the evolution of morphology. The insect wing is a fascinating developmental system in which to study this question, because of presence of vast diversification in insect wing morphologies. The proposed research will compare
Conor McMeniman
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
cmcmeni1@jhu.edu

My group studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving mosquito attraction to humans, and the impact of pathogen infection on mosquito olfactory perception and behavior.
Osama Bin manzoor
Entomology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan  Hubei  China
osmamanzoor11@hotmail.com

RNAi is a important tool to combat Insect Pests
Lien Thi Phuong Nguyen
Ph.D
CV
Insect Ecology Department
Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources
Hanoi Hanoi Vietnam
phuonglientit@gmail.com

My work is focusing on the inventory of hymenopterans and their ecology and behavior, especially wasps of the family Vespidae, bees of the family Apidae and ants of the family Formicidae, concentrating on the conservation of various areas within Vietnam such as limestone forest and mangrove forest.
Karan Singh
PhD Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali
Mohali Punjab India
karansinghlabana1984@gmail.com
Evolutionary Biology Lab
My broad area of research interest is evolutionary genetics and host-parasite interaction. My graduate work is mainly focused on how environmental stress shapes life history traits and underlying genetic mechanisms of increased cold stress resistance. Apart from my work on cold shock resistance, I have also focused on host-parasite interaction and I isolated a novel bacterial pathogen (Staphylococcus succinus) of D. melanogaster that is now being extensively used to study evolutionary ecology of immunity.
Kim Ferguson
PhD Candidate
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
kim.ferguson@wur.nl

I am an Early Stage Researcher (ESR) in the BINGO ITN, Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (www.bingo-itn.eu for more info). Right now I'm in the first stage of my PhD so I'm trying to discover as much as possible and learn techniques to help me in my project. I will work with a few different species, but the goal is to use NGS technology to explore the genetic variation in wild-caught and commercially reared populations of select biocontrol species. I will work with Trichogramma brassicae, Nesidiocoris tenuis, and Amblyseious swirskii (aka Typhlodromips swirskii). They
Lorna Cohen
PhD Candidate
Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
cohen36@uic.edu
Lynch Lab
I am currently researching the genetic basis of head development in the parasitiod wasp, Nasonia. We aim to elucidate how specific morphologies are encoded in the genome, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate size and shape.
Joaquin de Navascues
Research Fellow
European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute
Cardiff University
Cardiff Cardiff United Kingdom
denavascuesj@cardiff.ac.uk

I am interested in how cells take decisions based on inter cellular signalling, in particular about differentiation. I study this in the context of the adult intestinal stem cells of the fruit fly.
Johannes Schinko
Dr. rer. nat.
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhone-Alpes France
johannesschinko@hotmail.com

Genetic interactions during posterior elongation in short germ band insects.
Yizhou Chen
Senior Research Scientist
NSW Department of Primary Industries
Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute
Menangle NSW Australia
yizhou.chen@dpi.nsw.gov.au

genetics of insecticide resistance
Tetsuro Shinoda
Division of Insect Sciences
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
shinoda@affrc.go.jp

Molecular mechanisms of juvenile hormone action
Yuemei Dong
Dr.
Dept of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
ydong3@jhu.edu

Vector biology, malaria control, mosquito innate immunity, vector-borne infectious diseases
Clement Kent
Senior Scientist
Janelia Research Campus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Ashburn VA USA
clementfkent@gmail.com
Heberlein Lab
Insect behavior genetics, genomics, and population genomics. Research foci in Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera.
Sandra Rehan
Assistant Professor of Genome Enabled Biology
Biological Sciences
University of New Hampshire
Durham New Hampshire USA
sandra.rehan@unh.edu
UNH Bee Lab
My research focus is social evolution and genetics. I have a special interest in the origin and evolution of social behavior in bees. The lab has three main foci: molecular phylogeny, behavioral ecology and comparative genomics. We employ these three levels of biological integration to study social complexity at multiple evolutionary scales.
Qian Han
Professor
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences
Hainan University
Haikou Hainan China
qian_han@yahoo.com
Tropical Veterinary Medicine and Vector Biology
My research interests are in tropical veterinary medicine and vector biology, particularly biology of mosquitoes and epidemiology of vector-borne animal diseases in Hainan Island of China.
Neha Kulkarni
Bioinformatics
Department of Bioinformatics, Savitribai Phule Pune University (University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
5591.neha@gmail.com

-
Lyubov Yarinich
Laboratory of cell division
Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Novosibirsk Novosibirskaya oblast Russian Federation
l.yarinich@mcb.nsc.ru

Drosophila cell lines
Bart Pannebakker
Assistant Professor
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
bart.pannebakker@wur.nl

I am interested in the evolution and genomics of life-history traits and reproductive strategies in insects. My research focuses on the genetic and physiological mechanisms that underlie these traits in parasitoid wasps (insects that lay their eggs on other insects), and in honeybees. I am also Coordinator of BINGO-ITN: Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl. BINGO is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network that develops innovative research training to improve the production and performance of natural enemies in biological control by the use of genetic variation for rearing, monitoring and performance.
Heather Hines
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology, Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
hmh19@psu.edu
Hines Lab
My lab examines the evolution of adaptive trait variation, focusing heavily on the evolution of mimetic patterning. We are pushing a new system for evolutionary genetics and evo-devo in discovery of the genes that are driving the radiation in coloration, largely as a result of mimicry, in the bumble bees. We utilize more descriptive analytical chemsitry, developmental and systematic approaches, and combine these with genomic and transcriptomic approaches to target candidate genes for mimicry and better understand the evolution of this adaptive diversification. Once these genes are targeted we can gain a better understanding of how these novel phenotypes evolved,
Christopher Cunningham
Ph.D.
Department of Genetics
University of Georgia, Athens
Athens GA USA
cbc83@uga.edu
Moore Laboratory
My research focuses on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, such as social dominance networks and parent-offspring interactions. My current model system is Nicrophorus vespilloides, a burying beetle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicrophorus_vespilloides). I am particularly interested in the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in these behaviors and their natural variation. I use many techniques to answer my questions of interest; including, bioinformatics, gene expression, and proteomic tools.
Taro Nakamura
Post-Doc / Ph.D
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
arumakanorat@gmail.com
Extavour lab
Insect development and evolution / Live imaging with transgenic cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus / Gene modification (Knock-in and Knock-out) with CRISPR/Cas system and TALENs in Gryllus / Transgenics using piggyBac transposase /
Salim Ansari
Evolutionary developmental genetics
Georg August University, Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony  Germany
salim786biotech@gmail.com

I am one of the screener in the iBeetle project which is a genome-wide RNAi screening in red floor beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Our aim is to knockdown each & every gene of Tribolium castaneum by RNAi technique. We have following three main purpose from iBeetle project. 1. To identify the genes from those process which is either not present in Drosophila (stink gland, embryonic leg development etc.) or difficult to study (head involuted). 2. To make the Tribolium as efficient complementary screening platform to identify the function of conserved gene which is not easy
Fernando Consoli
PhD
Dept of Entomology and Acarology
University of Sao Paulo/ESALQ
Piracicaba Sao Paulo Brazil
fconsoli@usp.br
Insect Interactions Lab
Our lab is dedicated to understand the diversity and role of symbionts in insect bioecology, and to investigate the potential of symbionts for biotechnological exploitation. We also use functional transcriptomic and genomic analyses to investigate insect-insect and insect-symbionts interactions and to develop strategies for pest control (RNAi).
Takaaki Daimon
PhD
Insect Growth Regulation Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Japan
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
daimontakaaki@affrc.go.jp

Insect genetics and endocrinology
Ademir Martins
PhD
CV
Laficave
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ)
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
ademirjr@ioc.fiocruz.br
Lab of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors
Insecticide resistance mechanisms in insects of medical importance
William Bart Bryant
Research Assistant Professor
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Ks usa
wbb@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel Lab
Currently my research in the Kristin Michel lab focuses on studying the interplay between fecundity and immunity in the malaria vector mosquito.
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Aine O’Sullivan
Department of Entomology
Penn State University
University Park PA USA
aiosullivan29@gmail.com
Grozinger Lab
My research is focused on how bumble bee health can be improved by implementation of different genetic technologies to mitigate the effects of abiotic and biotic stressors.
Jacob Riveron
Postdoctoral Research Assistant
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
jacob.riveron@lstmed.ac.uk
Vector Biology -LSTM
My current research focus is on understanding the molecular basis underlying the insecticide resistance in the African malaria-mosquito, Anopheles funestus, using functional analyses. I also have interest in the functional characterization of genes involved in insecticide resistance in agricultural pests, in insect behavior, and in the elucidation of the molecular basis of the olfaction in Drosophila melanogaster and in malaria and dengue vectors.
Ferdinand NANFACK MINKEU
Mr
Parasitology and Mycology
Pasteur
Paris Paris 15 France
nanleplot@yahoo.fr

My researches are focused on host-pathogen interactions in African malaria mosquito. Transgenic tools to fight malaria Modification of Tribolium castaneum and Sitophilus oryzae for SIT control
Zhenqing Chen
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois USA
zqchen@illinois.edu

The social behavior of Honeybee
Sumeyra Sanal
PhD student
Molecular Entomology
Anadolu University
Eskisehir Tepebası Turkey
sumeyrasanal@gmail.com

Genetic and phylogeographical settlement of Tabanidae genus in the Turkey Fauna
Honglin Feng
Graduate Student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
honglin@bio.miami.edu
The Wilson Lab
Insect/Bacteria symbiosis
Peter Piermarini
Assistant Professor
Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
piermarini.1@osu.edu

My lab investigates the molecular physiology of mosquito vectors with a focus on the excretory system.
kailash lipne
Research and development
Mahyco Research centre, Jalna
Jalna Maharashtra INDIA
kailash.lipne@gmail.com
Research associate
RNAi technology, Insecticidal gene discovery.
Dina Fonseca
Professor
Entomology; Ecology&Evolution, Public Health
Rutgers University
Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics, Smithsonian
New Brunswick NJ USA
dinafons@rci.rutgers.edu
Fonseca
My primary research interests are the evolution, prevention, and control of invasive mosquitoes, the principal vectors of significant disease epizootics and epidemics. Our results indicate that populations differ in vectorial capacity over space and time, profoundly affecting epidemiological landscapes and risk estimates. Rapid evolution in invasive mosquito vectors is a good model for the effects of Global Climate Change on disease epidemiology.
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Kimberly Stephens
Entomology
University of California - Riverside
Riverside California United States
kstep002@ucr.edu

Sperm motility and sperm-egg interactions
Ethan Degner
Student
Entomology Department
Cornell University
Ithaca NY United States
ecd77@cornell.edu
Harrington Lab
I am broadly interested in the ecology of insect vectors of human disease. Specfically, I am interested in the reproductive biology of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.
Yong Zhang
Assistant Professor
Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno NV U.S
yongzhang@unr.edu

Neurobiology, circadian clocks
Soren Nylin
Professor
Zoology
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
soren.nylin@zoologi.su.se

Seasonal adaptations, life history, life cycle regulation in butterflies. Insect-plant relationships.
Margaret Allen
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Pests Research Unit
US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service
Stoneville MS USA
megallenathome@gmail.com
Functional Genetics
Functional genetics of a variety of insects that are non-model organisms.
Chris Jiggins
Professor
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambridge UK United Kingdom
c.jiggins@zoo.cam.ac.uk
Chris Jiggins
Adaptation and speciation in butterflies, especially focussing on wing pattern development and evolution. Interested to develop transgenic tests of wing pattern developmental factors
JohnsonkeW Kinyua
Dr.
Department of Biochemistry
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
Nairobi Kiambu Kenya
johnsonkinyua@jkuat.ac.ke

Development of transmission blocking vaccines
Zain UlAbdin
Dr./Assistant Professor
Entomology
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
zainunibas@gmail.com
"Insect Molecular Biology Lab."
Insect parasitoids have evolved an amazing array of mechanisms to manipulate host physiology and biochemistry and they are able to suppress the immune response of the host and to disrupt its development and reproduction. The virulence and host regulation factors triggering these alterations are injected by the ovipositing females in their hosts. The astonishing richness of species in the parasitic Hymenoptera pro¬vides a unique reservoir of molecular biodiversity for new bio¬insecticide molecules, targeting a number of insect species and developmental stages. Host-parasitoid associations in insects offer an impressive opportunity to identify new genes and molecules responsible for the major
Jacob Wenger
Ohio State Presidential Fellow
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
wenger.93@osu.edu

I am interested in the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing adaptation in pest insect populations, and how these mechanisms can be used to develop insect resistance management plans. My current work utilizes genomic analyses to clarify the inheritance and population dynamics of virulence to plant resistance in the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). I am also interested in the role of plasticity and endosymbionts in insect adaptation.
Dave Denlinger
CV
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
david.denlinger@aggiemail.usu.edu
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Kimberly Johansson
Undergraduate Researcher
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
kimberly.johansson@gmail.com
Extavour Lab
im is an undergraduate in the class of 2015 at Harvard College, where she is concentrating in Chemical & Physical Biology. In the Extavour Lab, she works with Taro Nakamura studying primordial germ cell development in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.
Konstantina Tsoumani
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
CV
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
kotsouma@bio.uth.gr
Molecular biology & Genomics - Mathiopoulos Lab
Genomic and transcriptomic analyses using NGS data, identification and functional analyses of genes involved 1) in reproductive behaviour including the olfactory and gustatory systems of the olive fruit fly, as well as 2) in embryogenesis, that can be used in the development of new genetic control strategies of the olive fly.
Wei Peng
Huazhong Agricultural University
College of Plant Science and Technology
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Insect Resource Application and Sustainable Pest Control and Institute of Urban and Horticultural Pests
Wuhan Hubei China
pengweijack@163.com
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Insect Resource Application and Sustainable Pest Control and Institute of Urban and Horticultural Pests
The molecular regulation of sex determination and female-specific lethality or embryonic conditional lethality in Bactrocera species 
Raman Chandrasekar
Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
manhattan Kansas United States
biochandrus@yahoo.com
Research Associate
1. RNA Sequence analysis, Genomic and Proteomics appraoches 2. Study of insect proteins and enzymes will not only give valuable information on their unique biochemistry and physiology but will also identify novel tools for the development of new technologies and new ways to produce novel insect control measures. My main focus is will address the physiological and biochemical functions of proteins and enzymes in the insects’ life processes by using proteomics tools (i.e 2D PAGE, MS, MALDI-TOF, PMF), characterization of novel enzymes, qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their interactions on a genome scale,
Xianhui Wang
professor
CV
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents
Institute of Zoology
Beijing  Beijing  China
wangxh@ioz.ac.cn
Behavioral epigenetics
Insect epigenetics, behavioral plasticity, olfactory receptors
Muhammad Tayyib Naseem
CV
Agriculture Biotechnology Division
National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
tayyibnaseem@hotmail.com
Muhammad Naseem
DNA based identification of aphid species and vector-virus association analysis of aphid borne luteovirus
John Chaston
Assistant Professor
Genetics & Biotechnology
Brigham Young University
Provo UT USA
john_chaston@byu.edu

genetic basis for Drosophila-microbiota interactions
Laura Harrington
Professor
Department of Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
lch27@cornell.edu
Harrington lab
Research in the Harrington lab focuses on mosquito vector ecology, biology, and behavior. Our goal is to understand basic (and often overlooked) aspects of mosquito biology in order to identify new targets for controlling mosquitoes and reducing transmission of vector-borne diseases.
Maureen Gorman
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
mgorman@ksu.edu

Iron metabolism is a vital biological process in all eukaryotic organisms, but the mechanisms of iron metabolism in insects are poorly understood. Our research is focused on iron transport and the relationship between iron metabolism and innate immunity in insects. We use a combination of genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry methods to study iron metabolism and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Manduca sexta, and Tribolium castaneum. These studies should lead to a better understanding of two fundamental components of insect physiology and, thus, provide information that can be used in future efforts to control insect
Karl Joplin
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
East Tennessee State University
Johnson City Tennessee USA
joplin@etsu.edu
Karl Joplin
Physiology and molecular biology of diapause, Insect behavior and circadian rhythms, Stress response of insects
Bryony Bonning
Director, NSF I/UCRC
Department of Entomology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
bbonning@ufl.edu
Insect Management Technology
Molecular interactions between viruses and insects, and between microbe-derived insect toxins and their receptors. Fundamental knowledge of these interactions is then used to optimize current insect pest management strategies and to develop novel environmentally benign solutions.
Roya Nasirian
Plant Protection
University of Mohaghegh Ardabili
Ardebil IRAN IRAN
nasirian.roya@yahoo.com

Investigate digestive enzymes
prof prem raj pushpakaran
professor
BioTechnology
NITC
calicut kerala india
drpremrajp@nitc.ac.in

immunology, bio-informatics
Jianwu Chen
Dr
Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA United States
jwchen97@yahoo.com

Mechanism of action of Bt toxins
Jingfei Huang
Dr.
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Plant Protection
Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
Fuzhou Fujian China
jfhuang@fafu.edu.cn

insect genome; insecticide resistance; programmed cell death
DEEPAK KUMAR SINHA
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology
M.M. University, India
AMBALA HARYANA INDIA
deepak22sinha@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Entomologist
I developed deep interest in insect pest biology with regards to its interaction with host. My research area deals with understanding the molecular basis of insect-plant interactions. In this broad field, I am specially interested in insect pests of crops such as rice and wheat. I have worked on gall midge, aphids and want to focus more on yellow stem borers. I want to understand aspects of virulence of these pests and also investigate into the role of different gut bacteria in virulence.
Shengzhang Dong
Ph.D
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public health
Baltimore MD USA
dongshzhang@gmail.com

Aedes mosquito-arbovirus interactions; Anopheles mosquito-Plasmodium parasite interactions; insect miRNAs; insect immunity; insect physiology and molecular biology.
Maaria Kankare
Academy Fellow
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyvaskyla
Jyvaskyla Keski-Suomi Finland
maaria.kankare@jyu.fi
Evolutionary Genetics
My research interests are focused on the adaptation to northern conditions at the genetic and genomic levels. Current work is directed to the role of alternative splicing in candidate genes in life-history traits involved in adaptation to seasonally varying environment.
Claire Donald
Miss
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
University of Glasgow
Glasgow GLASGOW Scotland, UK
1103886d@student.gla.ac.uk
Kohl Lab
The Kohl group works on RNA interference, immune signalling pathways and virus/host interactions in arthropod vectors by using arboviruses or virus-derived replicons from all major families. The aim of my work is to further understand the interaction of arboviruses with the RNAi responses of their mosquito vector.
Arnubio Valencia
Plant Sciences
Universidad de Caldas
Manizales Caldas Colombia
arnubio.valencia@ucaldas.edu.co

Research activities are focused on the study of transcripts (RNAm) from the intestinal tract of insect pests, in order to find some target insect genes that could be silenced using RNAi technology. In addition, I am also interested in cloning and expression of insect genes involved with the digestion of cellulose with potential to be used in future programs related with bioenergy production and Insect transcriptome analysis.
Sang Chan
Mr
Genetics
Cambridge University
Cambridge Cambs UK
ysc31@cam.ac.uk
Fly Facility
Genetic gene drive systems for insect population control.
varada abhyankar
MBRl, Department of Zoology
Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune
Pune Maharashtra India
varada.abhyankar@gmail.com
Molecular Biology Research laboratory
Epigenetic and molecular mechanisms involved in immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.
Zhao Chunyue
School of Life Sciences
Peking University
Bejing Beijing China
chunyuezhaopku@163.com

I use fly,cell culture and animal model systems to study cell death mechanisms and related drugs that can rescue or enhance cell death.
Natalia Vinasco Arias
Biological Control Researcher
Caldas University
Manizales Caldas Colombia
vinasco.natalia@gmail.com

I'm Agronomic Engineer with specialization in Biological Control, IPMs and Biology Molecular of Insects pest. In this moment, I'm working in paratiroides of order Diptera for control of weevils and other pest of citrus and fruits of region. Also, I´m working in peptides antimicrobial of plants for include in the control of bacterias and insects pest.
Brittany Dodson
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA USA
bld25@psu.edu

Recently there has been a lot of excitement surrounding the study of microorganisms that live inside us and how they influence our health. Insects also have relationships with their own microorganisms, but most research surrounding them has merely been descriptive. Medically important insects (like mosquitoes) vary in their ability to transmit pathogens, possibly due to differences between internal environments of those insects. Studies have found that mosquito bacteria abundance and diversity may impact malaria parasites. However, the identity, function and utility of those microbes are virtually unknown, especially in mosquitoes that transmit viruses. I am investigating how bacteria within the mosquito
philip Ndaloma
Lecturer
CV
Plant and Soil Sciences
Cuttington University
Monrovia Gbarnga  Liberia
firstnamephilipndaloma@yahoo.com

Climate change impact on the re-occurrence of army worm
Patricia Jumbo Lucioni
Postdoctoral research scholar
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN USA
patricia.jumbo@vanderbilt.edu
Postdoctoral Research Scholar-Broadie Lab
My current research field addresses the unknown mechanisms behind inborn errors of metabolism, classic galactosemia and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Patients with these disorders grow to develop neurodevelopmental complications of unknown mechanism which lack appropriate treatment. I use fruit flies as genetic models to characterize these phenotypes and elucidate disease mechanisms underlying these chronic inborn deficits.
Michelle Brown
Vice President & Chief Scientist
R & D
Olfactor Laboratories Inc
Riverside California United States
mbrown@olfactorlabs.com

Olfactor Laboratories, Inc. (OLI) is designing and developing innovative products that can be part of the world-wide strategy to significantly reduce diseases spread by insects and lower the general nuisance caused by their proximity to humans. Our initial research is focused on mosquitos as they are a major cause of the spread of many debilitating and potentially lethal diseases around the world. By using safe chemicals to disrupt the insect’s olfactory system (the primary mechanism used in locating a human or other animal to use as a source of a blood-meal), OLI’s efficient and cost-effective products will seek to protect humans
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Kajan Muneeswaran
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
University of Colombo
Colombo Western province Sri Lanka
kajan.muneeswaran@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
Developing transgenic mosquitoes resistant to all four dengue viral serotypes in Sri Lanka by RNA interference pathway which can be activated by the blood-meal in female mosquitoes to combat against the #1 killer dengue disease which kills more than 200 annually.
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Valentina Resnik
Intitut für Bienenkunde, Oberursel
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Oberusel Hessen Germany
valentinaresnik@gmx.de

Comparative analysis of metabotropic transmitter receptors in the honeybee and its external parasitic mite Varroa destructor
Alekos Simoni
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London London United Kingdom
a.simoni@imperial.ac.uk

Applying state of the art molecular biology to vector control with the aim of reducing malaria transmission
niels Wynant
PhD
Biology
Zoological Institute
Leuven Vlaams-Brabant Leuven
niels.wynant@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
Regulation of (systemic) RNA interference (RNAi) in insects
Yang Chan
Miss
Ecology and Insect Toxicology
Institute of Zoology
Beijing The city of Beijing China
yangchanhb@126.com

Ecology and Insect Toxicology
Simon Groen
PhD
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona
Tucson Arizona United States of America
scgroen@email.arizona.edu
Whiteman Lab
Plant-insect interactions
Brian Counterman
Biological Sciences
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS USA
bcounterman@biology.msstate.edu

Evolution, Population Genomics, Speciation
Junbo Luan
Entomology
Cornell university
Ithaca NY USA
jbluan@hotmail.com

Whitefly genetics, and molecular mechanisms of whitefly interactions with other organisms
Sang Chan
Mr
Genetics
Cambridge University
Cambridge Cambridgeshire United Kingdom
kermitthefly@gmail.com
Flylab
Genetic gene drive systems.
Tamsin Jones
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
tjones01@fas.harvard.edu
Extavour Lab
I am interested in the evolution of germ line genes and their function. My current project examines the evolution of the oskar gene in insects. In flies, oskar is essential for germ line development, but in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, oskar functions in neural development. I am studying the molecular function of oskar in the cricket early nervous system.
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Fidel de la Cruz Hernandez-Hernandez
PhD
Infectomica y Patogenesis Molecular
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico DF Mexico
cruzcruz@cinvestav.mx
Molecular Entomology
Physiology of midgut, fat body and salivary glans during feeding.
Ifeoma Ezugbo-Nwobi
Parasitology and Entomology
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka Anambra Nigeria
ifeomaezugbonwobi@yahoo.com
Parasitology and Entomology Research Lab
Focused on understanding vector-borne diseases like Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Dengue, Yellow fever, etc, so that better control measures can be developed. I seek to integrate traditional parasitological and entomological procedures with molecular genetics and bioinformatics-based technologies to deliver new insights into vector biology and ecology.
Helena Richardson
Group Leader
CV
Research
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne V ictoria Australia
Drh_richardson@yahoo.com.au
Cell cycle and development lab
My research ulilizes the vinegar fly, Drosophila, to model tumourigenesis, with the vision of understanding how regulators of cell polarity and the actin cytoskeleton impact on cell signalling and cell proliferation, a field in which she is internationally recognised. She collaborates with mammalian researchers to translate her findings to mouse and human cancer models.
Jozef Vanden Broeck
Prof. Dr.
Animal Physiology and Neurobiology (Dept. of Biology)
University of Leuven
Leuven Flanders Belgium
Jozef.VandenBroeck@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
This research group is investigating the physiological role and mode of action of neural and endocrine messenger molecules in postembryonic developmental processes. These processes are studied in an evolutionary context by comparative approaches. In particular, we are studying receptors and their signal transduction pathways in insect cells. Our aim is to unravel the cellular and organismal physiological mechanisms that regulate important post-embryonic developmental processes, such as growth and reproduction. The group is also interested in the influence of environmental factors that can lead to the extreme phenotypic plasticity of locust species. In addition, application-oriented research is carried out to explore novel
Panagiota Koskinioti
Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
pakoskin@bio.uth.gr

My research focuses on the role of the host preference and the presence of symbionts in the genetic profile of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
Ariel Chipman
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Israel Israel
ariel.chipman@huji.ac.il

Arthropod evo-devo
YF Wang
Professor
College of Life Sciences
Central China Normal University
Wuhan Hubei Province China
yfengw@hotmail.com
Animal development and immunity
Drosophila reproduction and development; Effect of Wolbachia infection on Insect reproduction and behavior
Adriana Costero-Saint Denis
Vector Biology Program Officer
Div. of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Rockville Maryland USA
acostero@niaid.nih.gov

Vector biology
Rodney Richardson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Columbus  Ohio USA
richardson.827@osu.edu

My research efforts focus on issues pertaining to toxicology and immunology in the European honey bee. Specifically, I am interested in the discovery and mechanistic explanation of how environmentally encountered xenobiotics affect insect immune function.
carole long
Chief, Malaria Immunology Section
Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/NIH
Rockville MD USA
clong@niaid.nih.gov
Malaria Immunology Section
Immunity to malaria parasites including sexuals stages Vaccine development Field studies in Mali Studies of sexual stages of malaria parasites in culture and in the mosquito Mosquito membrane feeding assays and blocking of transmission with drugs or vaccines
Christopher Jones
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
Moravian College
Bethlehem PA United States
jonesc@moravian.edu

My lab focuses primarily on behavioral genetics, currently a phenotype in Drosophila called "bang-sensitivity," in which subjecting the flies to strong physical shocks (as in a standard lab vortex) triggers seizures.
Derric Nimmo
Product Development Manager
Public Health Research
Oxitec
Abingdon Milton Park United Kingdom
derric.nimmo@oxitec.com

My career has given me a broad background in insect and parasite molecular biology. My PhD. looked for novel mechanisms of drug resistance in Leishmania sp. leading to postdoctoral work that concentrated on the genetic transformation of mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti, An, stephensi and An, gambiae) and the development of site-specific integration systems for genes. I started at Oxitec in 2005 as Head of Public Health Research with the aim of developing new RIDL systems in mosquitoes, supported by a Gates grant of $5 million. From this work we produced the new products in mosquitoes and published this work in Nature
Reed Johnson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
johnson.5005@osu.edu

In our lab we are seeking to understand how pollinators interact with the pesticides and toxins they encounter. The managed European honey bee, Apis mellifera, serves as a model pollinator for toxicological testing and toxicogenomics. While the honey bee is the most economically important pollinator in the U.S. and serves as an excellent model species, we are also interested in other pollinating insects as well.
Seth Donoughe
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
seth.donoughe@gmail.com

Insect development and evolution
Dr. ATUL KUMAR PANDEY
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
Alexander Silberman Institute of life sciences
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
atulkumarpandey@gmail.com
Sociobiology Lab
Sociobiological, physiological and behavioural studies of sleep and its deprivational consequences
Shyh-Chi Chen
Ophthalmology
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati Ohio USA
shyhchi@gmail.com

circadian rhythm
Jonathan Wang
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
jonbwang@yahoo.com

I am working on projects that aim to identify genes playing a role in fungal susceptibility/resistance in Drosophila, elucidate fungal interactions, and genetically engineer fungus for agricultural applications.
Magali Eychenne
Entomology
INRA
Montpellier cedex 05 Languedoc Roussillon France
magali.eychenne@univ-montp2.fr
DGIMI
Lepidopteran functionnal genomics
Gianluca Tettamanti
Associate Professor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
University of Insubria
Varese --- Italy
gianluca.tettamanti@uninsubria.it
Laboratory of Invertebrate Biology
- Cell death and regeneration in insect development - Insect biotechnology - Immune response in insects
Liang Sun
Tea cultivation and pest control
Tea Research Institution, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science
Hangzhou Zhejiang China
liangsun1029@126.com

Molecular and cellular mechanism of insect olfactory detection
Maike Hink
Biochemistry & Physiology
Pest Control Research
Bayer CropScience AG
Monheim NRW Germany
maike.hink@bayer.com

Insect neuroscience
Christopher Jones
Dr
AgroEcology
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire United Kingdom
christopher.jones@rothamsted.ac.uk
Post-doctoral Researcher
I have worked with insects of both medical and agricultural importance to understand the genetic basis of phenotypes, and in particular, insecticide resistance. I currently study insect migration in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, combining tethered flight assays with genomic approaches to understand the genetic basis of this phenomenon.
Markus Brown
Entomology
University of Maryland
Beltsville MD USA
markus.a.brown@hotmail.com

Cells experience a variety of stresses in their environment, whether from friend, foe, or terrain, and must adapt to their changing environment to maintain their survival. This occurs in two ways, evolution and epigentic modifications. Evolution is the much slower process by which the cell permanently alters the enzymes in its arsenal, whilst epigenetics are a quick, temporary change in pace caused by fleeting stresses in the environment. I hope to elucidate the mechanisms by which fungi use epigenetics to quickly mediate and monitor their gene expression profiles in response to alterations in their environment.
Monique van Oers
Prof dr
Laboratory of Virology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland Netherlands
monique.vanoers@wur.nl
Insect Virology
Insect virus host interactions, baculoviruses, SGHV, iridovirus, lepidoptera, Glossinia, Spodoptera exigua, behavioral manipulation, virus entry mechanisms
Yoshiaki Tanaka
Senior Researcher
Insect Gene Function Research Unit
National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
yoshiaki@affrc.go.jp
Insect Gene Function Research Unit
Neuropeptide and GPCR
Nico Posnien
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
nico.posnien@gmail.com

My main focus of our research is understanding the molecular basis of natural variation in complex morphological traits. We mainly work on insect and spider systems and apply genome wide approaches in combination with classical developmental biology methods.
Graham Thompson
Associate Professor
Biology
Western University
London Ontario Canada
graham.thompson@uwo.ca
The Social Biology Group
My lab studies the biological basis of insect social behaviour; how it evolves, how it is maintained and why some species are social while others are not. Much like human societies, eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites show bewildering complexity in how their societies are structured. Yet for insects, this complexity is derived from an economically simple division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive specialists. Studying reproductive division of labour in insects at the level of the gene can provide key insights into how complex social systems evolved from simpler, ancestral ones. Studies on social insects can also help understand
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Maurijn van der Zee
Dr.
Institute of Biology
Leiden University
Leiden ZH Netherlands
m.van.der.zee@biology.leidenuniv.nl
Van der Zee lab
-comparative genomics and evolution of the TGFbeta ligands -transgenesis, live imaging and blastoderm formation -the function of the serosa in innate immunity
Laura Boykin
Dr.
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The University of Western Australia
Crawley Western Australia Australia
laura.boykin@uwa.edu.au

I am interested in invasive species (Influenza, Hepatitis C, Carribbean Fruit fly, Whitefly, Asian citrus psyllid, Gypsy moth, Aphid parasitoid, and the Oriental Fruit Fly). My expertise in genomics, phylogentic theory and utilisation of supercomputers has made a substantial contribuion to understanding the evolutionary history of the invasive species. My most influential work has come from contributions (12 publications) to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), the vector of the devastating Cassava Mosaic Viruses.
Leigh Boardman
Dr
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Fl USA
lboardman@ufl.edu

Integrative and comparative biology, genotype-phenotype interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying organismal tolerance to environmental stressors
Xi’en Chen
Dr.
College of Plant Protection
Northwest A&F University
Yangling Shannxi China
chenpp2006@nwsuaf.edu.cn

The physiological roles of insect protein phosphatases; molecular basis of physiological changes in insects under abiotic and/or biotic stresses; Xenobiotic resistance in insects resulting from metabolic enzymes and/or target site insensitivity; in vitro degradation of insecticide by insect metabolic enzymes
Hu Wan
Dr.
College of Plant Science and Technology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan Hubei China
huwan@mail.hzau.edu.cn

Insect Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Insect Functional Genomics, Development of Recombinant Viral Pesticides
Sufang Zhang
Assistant Professor
Forest Protection
Research Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection
Beijing Beijing China
zhangsf@caf.ac.cn

Forest insect olfactory mechanisms, Forest protection, Forest pest management
yongjun Zhang
PhD, Professor
Entomology
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
yjzhang@ippcaas.cn

(1) chemical communication regulation between insect pests and host plant, (2) regulation of insect olfactory behaviour, (3) resistance of host plants to insect pests, and (4) bio-safety of GMOs
hongyu zhang
Dr Prof
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology, College of Plant Science and Technology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology
Wuhan Hubei China
2496398633@qq.com
Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology
Insect molecular and Microbiology, Control techniques of Urban and Horticultural insect pests, especially fruit fly etc citrus insect pests.
anjiang tan
Dr.
Key Laboratory of Insect Developmental and Evolutionary Biology
Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Shanghai Shanghai China
ajtan01@sibs.ac.cn

Insect transgene, genome editing
Zhou Qiang
Professor
State Key Laboratory of Biological Control
Sun Yat-sen University
Guangzhou  Guangdong P R China
lsszhou@mail.sysu.edu.cn
Insect-Plant biololgy
The effect of rice nutrtion on the reproduction and development of insect
Ronald van Rij
Medical Microbiology
Radboudumc and Radboud Inst for Molecular Life Sciences
Nijmegen - Nijmegen
r.vanrij@ncmls.ru.nl

My lab is interested in antiviral immunity in insects. We study small RNA-based defense systems (siRNA and piRNA) in fruit flies and mosquitoes, and mechanisms by which viruses suppress these responses. Other interests include the identification of non-RNAi based mechanisms of antiviral defense and epigenetic control of innate immunity.
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
Giuseppe Saccone
PhD, Assist. Professor
Department of Biology
University Federico II of Naples
Naples Italy Italy
giuseppe.saccone@unina.it
Sex Evo Devo
Evolution of sex determining genes and networks in dipteran species of economic or medical relevance. Molecular entomology and Insect Biotechnology. We have uncovered in the mediterranean fruitly Ceratitis capitata a key epigenetic gene for female sex determination, Cctra(ep), which has an additional autoregulatory function compared to the Drosophila tra orthologue, which lost it. In Ceratitis, as in Drosophila, Cctra(ep) controls the splicing of the downstream doublex and fruitless genes. We and others have found that this evolutionary version of transformer(ep) is a master gene for female sex determination widely conserved in Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera. We have developed a
Subbarayalu Mohankumar
Professor
Plant biotechnology
Tamil Nadu agricultural university
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
Smktnau@gmail.com
Molecular ecology
Molecular ecology of crop- pest interactions, diversity of pollinators , IPM, pest genetics and genomics
CRISTINA MANJON
Postdoctoral Researcher
Insect toxicology and Resistance
Bayer CropScience
Monheim NRW Germany
cristina.manjon@bayer.com
Insect toxicology and Resistance Lab
I am a researcher part of the Resistance Management team working closely with Ralf Nauen at Bayer CropScience. I am interested in the study of the detoxification mechanisms that operate in beneficials as well as in different pest species that develop insecticide resistance. In order to carry out this research we rely on different techniques for genetic profiling (microarrays, RNAseq, real-time PCR, etc.), as well as on gene silencing approaches such as RNA interference (RNAi technology, dsRNA).
Philipp Lehmann
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyväskylä
Jyväskylä Central Finland Finland
philipp.lehmann@jyu.fi

My research area covers both behavioral and physiological aspects of survival in and expansion to environments with large seasonal fluctuations. I primarily study energetic and immunity related stress responses during insect diapause in high latitude environments.
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Rahul Rane
Genetics
Bio21, University of Melbourne
Parkville VIC Australia
rahulvrane@gmail.com
Hoffman Lab
My project mainly revolves around tracking the genomic basis of climate adaptation and by extension inspecting adaptive capacity under a climate change model using high throughput ‘next-generation’ sequencing. I study multiple Drosophila species as a result (Sophophora as well as the Repleta group) to ask whether with an increase in global temperatures, will different species adapt to changing conditions on a genomic level? Also what intra and inter specific changes will define this adaptive capacity for ecologically important traits as heat and desiccation tolerance. Along with this I am also developing Drosophila specific softwares and pipelines for accurate and efficient assembly
Ramasamy Asokan
Principal Scientist (Agricultural Entomology)
CV
Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bangalore  Karnataka INDIA
asokaniihr@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology
RNAi in the management of 1. Sap sucking insects viz. Thrips, whiteflies, aphids, leaf hoppers, mirids 2. Lepidoptera (Helicoverpa armigera, Spodoptera litura, Plutella xylostella) 3. Discovery and utilization of small RNAs especially microRNAs from insect pests
Mauro Mandrioli
PhD
Life Sciences
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Modena Italy Italy
mauro.mandrioli@unimo.it
Insect genetics and Biosciences Lab
Insect cytogenetics and microbiome analysis
Carlos Gustavo Nunes Silva
Professor
Department of Genetics
Universidade Federal do Amazonas
Manaus Amazonas Brazil
cgmanaus@gmail.com
Lab. DNA technologies
"Beeotechnology"
Nancy Moran
Professor
Integrative Biology
University of Texas at Austin
Austin TX USA
nancy.moran@austin.utexas.edu
Nancy Moran
I study biology and evolution of insects especially symbiotic relationships. Main groups of interest are aphids, leafhoppers, and bees.
Dimitrios Kontogiannatos
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology Department
Agricultural University of Athens
Athens Attika Greece
dim_kontogiannatos@yahoo.gr

I am studying the use of RNAi technology in several aspects of Insect Science, like functional genomics, endocrinology and pest management (Baculovirus, bacterial-mediated dsRNA delivery and direct transfer of dsRNAs) in the Lepidopteran species Sesamia nonagrioides.  I am also working with insect cell lines and baculovirus technology in order to express and biochemically characterize important developmental genes of several insect pests. 
Jie Hung, Patricia King
Dr.
Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Universiti Putra Malaysia
Bintulu, Sarawak Not Applicable Malaysia
patriciaking1127@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
Termite digestome: unravelling its enzymes repertoires and secondary metabolites through metatranscriptomes and proteomic analysis; and investigate its gut microbiota using metagenomics approach
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Maarten Jongsma
Dr
Business Unit Bioscience
Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Center
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
maarten.jongsma@wur.nl
High throughput phenotyping plant resistance to insects
I am involved both in studies of insect behaviour on plants using videotracking technology and highly parallel arena plates as well as in GPCR olfactory and taste receptor studies based on a new microfluidic platform
Nicolas Durand
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables Florida USA
nfdurand@gmail.com
Alex Wilson's lab
Insect physiology and ecology Sap feeding insects Symbiosis
Rocio Ng
Ecology and Evolution
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook New York United States
rocio.s.ng@gmail.com

My thesis work involves investigating the phenotypic evolution of pigmentation traits in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Pigmentation is the most striking feature of many organisms and often exhibit high levels of diversity within and between species. In addition, pigmentation may play a role in multiple adaptations and be subject to diverse selection pressures. For my dissertation, I am employing a candidate gene approach to illuminate how the melanin pathway genes pale and ebony may be contributing to variation in pigmentation traits in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster in the United States. The pale gene
Omogo Collins
Mr.
CV
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
International Centre For Insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Kenya Kenya
graomogo@yahoo.com
Icipe-Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Unit
My career goal is to be an investigator in tropical medicine, focusing in research on the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), and emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), with focus on the identification and validation of novel drug targets for chemotherapeutic control.
Frank Criscione
Entomology
University of Maryland
Rockville MD USA
fcris@umd.edu

Enhancer trap technologies and mosquito hematology.
Alexander Franz
Dr.
Dept. of Veterinary Pathobiology
University of Missouri
Columbia  Missouri USA
franza@missouri.edu

Arbovirus-mosquito interactions; identification of genes/pathways in mosquitoes determining vector competence for arboviruses; interrupting arbovirus disease cycle in Aedes aegypti
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Leonard Rabinow
professor
Biology
Univ. Paris Sud
Orsay none France
leonard.rabinow@u-psud.fr

Regulation of sex determination, apoptosis, and signal transduction via phosphorylation by LAMMER protein kinases
Sara Oppenheim
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
American Museum of Natural History
NY NY USA
saraoppenheim@gmail.com

The evolution of host plant use and diet breadth in specialists and generalists.
Paul Linser
Professor of Cell Biology
Whitney Laboratory
University of Florida
Saint Augustine Florida USA
pjl@whitney.ufl.edu
Linser Lab
Cell biology of a number of organismal systems. In regard to mosquitoes, my group has focused on epithelial physiology and cell biology as it impacts alimentary canal function. Tools we use include transcriptomics, electrophysiology, advanced imaging (light microscopy), general molecular biology.
Emilie Pondeville
Dr
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
Glasgow Glasgow Scotland, UK
emilie.pondeville@glasgow.ac.uk

Reproduction and immunity in mosquito vectors using genetic tools
Don Champagne
Associate Professor
Entomology/Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases
University of Georgia
Athens Georgia USA
dchampa@uga.edu
Champagne Lab
I am interested in characterizing salivary factors that facilitate blood feeding by arthropods. More specifically, I am interested in proteins and peptides that modulate vertebrate hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses.
Aline Edith Noutcha
Dr- Senior Lecturer
CV
Entomology & Pest Management Unit, Department of Animal & Environmental Biology
University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria
naemekeu@yahoo.com
Entomology & Pest Management Research Lab
Understanding Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases eg: Malaria, Filariases (Epidemiology, Immunology, Parasitology, Genomics, Entomology, Cytogenetics, Cell Biology) Prevention & Control of Vector Borne Infectious Diseases (Community Education on Basic Control Practices and Healthy Life Styles, Good Environmental Practices; Inventory of Cultural Control Methods among various communities; Determination of factors affecting compliance of imported/prescribed control approaches). Monitoring Resistance phenomena in Insect & Parasites.
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes
Associate Professor
Entomology and Plant Pathology
University of Tennessee
Knoxville TN USA
jurat@utk.edu

Our research is focused on the physiology of the insect gut, particularly the molecular characterization of interactions between the gut epithelium and insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the identification of novel enzymes for biofuel production, and the characterization of the gut regenerative response after pathogenic attack.
Julie Reynolds
Postdoctoral Researcher
Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
reynolds.473@osu.edu
Postdoctoral Researcher
Molecular, Biochemical, and Physiological aspects of diapause.
Michael Kanost
Distinguished Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kanost@ksu.edu
Kanost lab
My laboratory is investigating proteins present in the hemolymph (blood) of insects, with special interest in the proteins' functions in the insect immune system. We are studying plasma proteins, including prophenoloxidase, serine proteases, protease inhibitors from the serpin superfamily, and proteins that bind to microbial polysaccharides. The long range goal is to understand the biochemical and cellular processes by which insect immune systems recognize and respond to pathogens and parasites. We also investigate the biochemistry of cuticle proteins and their roles in determining mechanical properties of insect exoskeletons. A third current research area is the biochemistry of multicopper oxidases in
Paul Eggleston
Prof.
Life Sciences
Keele University
Keele Staffs. UK
p.eggleston@keele.ac.uk
Molecular Entomology
My research interests are in molecular entomology, particularly the molecular genetics of mosquitoes that transmit human disease and their complex interactions with the parasites and viruses that cause disease. Because of their medical importance, the focus of my group is on the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Current projects include the development of technologies for genetic engineering of mosquitoes, the creation of genetically modified mosquitoes that are compromised in their ability to transmit disease and the development of strategies for stage- and tissue-specific gene expression within genetically modified mosquitoes. My research has attracted
Punya Nachappa
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
Indiana University-Purdue University
Fort Wayne Indiana United States
nachappa@ipfw.edu

My research seeks to understand the ecological consequences and molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between plants, pathogens, and insect vectors. The two key questions of my research program are: (1) how do pathogens affect biology and ecology of their hosts including, insects and plants? and (2) what plant and/or insect responses mediate plant-pathogen-vector interactions?
Daniel Sonenshine
Professor (Emeritus)
Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk Virginia United States
dsonensh@odu.edu
Tick Lab
Neurobiology of ticks; transcriptomics; neuropeptides, neurotransmitters; tick-borne pathogens; innate immunity; pheromones.
Gregory Lanzaro
Professor
Vector Genetics Laboratory, Dept. Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology
University of California-Davis
Davis California United States
gclanzaro@ucdavis.edu
Vector Genetics Lab
My research background is in insect population genetics with a focus on insect vectors of human disease. Recently I have been moving from classical population genetics to population genomics and bioinformatics. Our current emphasis has largely shifted from using genetic markers, such as microsatellite DNA and SNPs, to next generation sequencing, allowing us to analyze the genetics of populations by studying diversity at the individual mosquito whole genome level. Our work can be considered on two levels: (i) as contributing to an improved understanding of disease transmission and control and (ii) basic evolutionary genetics addressing issues involving the evolution of
Maohua Chen
Prof.
CV
Department of Entomology
Northwest A&F University
Yangling Shaanxi Province China
maohua.chen@nwsuaf.edu.cn
Insecticide Resistance and Insect Population Genetics
I am using molecular markers (microstatellites, mitochondrial genes and other makers) to investigate how environmental and anthropogenic factors affect the genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow pattern of insect populations.
Gene Robinson
Swanlund Chair of Entomology
Department of Entomology and Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana IL USA
generobi@illinois.edu
Robinson Lab
Robinson uses genomics and systems biology to study the mechanisms and evolution of social life. His principal model system is the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, along with other species of bees. The goal is to explain the function and evolution of behavioral mechanisms that integrate the activity of individuals in a society, neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate behavior within the brain of the individual, and the genes that influence social behavior. Research focuses on division of labor, aggression, and the famous dance language, a system of symbolic communication. Current projects include: 1) nutritional regulation of brain gene expression
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
cmerlin@bio.tamu.edu
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Alexandra Wilson
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
acwilson@bio.miami.edu
Wilson Group
The Wilson Group's research focuses on the symbiosis of sap-feeding insects with their obligate intracellular bacterial symbionts. Working within an evolutionary framework they use protein expression systems and immunolocalization to functionally characterize amino acid transporters at the symbiotic interface of sap-feeding insects.
Kevin Nyberg
Biology
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park MD USA
kevingnyberg@gmail.com

I am currently researching the expression and evolution of long noncoding RNAs in the genus Drosophila.
Wayne Hunter
Research Entomologist
Subtropical Insects Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Fort Pierce Florida USA
wayne.hunter@ars.usda.gov
U.S. Horticultural Research Lab
RNAi to manage hemipteran pests, Psyllid & Leafhopper Genomics. Viral pathogens, cell culture.
Thomas Werner
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
twerner@mtu.edu
Werner Lab
Evo-devo and toxicology in Drosophila. Please visit: http://www.mtu.edu/biological/department/faculty/werner/
Jay Evans
Research Scientist
Bee Research Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Beltsville MD USA
jay.evans@ars.usda.gov
Bee Research Lab
We study honey bee traits linked with disease and stress resistance, and use genetic and genomic techniques to understand honey bee health as well as the virulence traits and biologics of parasites and pathogens of bees. Current projects include honey bee resistance to gut parasites, interactions among members of the bee microbiome, and genomic analyses of a key honey bee parasite, the mite Varroa destructor.
Yehuda Ben-Shahar
Assistant Professor
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis Missouri USA
benshahary@wustl.edu
Ben-Shahar lab at Wash U
We are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity on three major time scales: evolutionary, Developmental and Physiological. We address these questions with the powerful genetic model Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), and the emerging model for complex social behaviors, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Research approaches in the lab include behavior, genetics, genomics, molecular and cellular biology, and neurophysiology.
Claude Desplan
Professor
CV
Biology
NYU
New York New York United States
cd38@nyu.edu
Molecular Genetics
EVO-DEVO: Evolution of axis formation using the wasp Nasonia. Different strategies are used in insects to establish embryonic polarity. In the ancestral short-germ mode of development, nuclei fated to become the embryo are restricted to the posterior end of the egg while the anterior of the egg develops as extra-embryonic membranes. Only anterior segments are patterned at the syncytial blastoderm while abdominal segments form in a posterior growth zone. This system relies on a single posterior morphogenetic center whereby a localized posterior determinant (nanos) is responsible for forming gradients of factors that pattern head and thorax. In the derived long-germ
Badrul Arefin
Molecular Biosciences
Stockholm University
Stockholm   Sweden
badrul.arefin@su.se
Ulrich Theopold
I am interested in to understand the molecular and the cellular mechanisms involved in the response against nematode infections in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am working on insect immunity, particularly Drosophila immunity towards entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN). Until now, our knowledge on Drosophila immunity mostly comes from studies of bacterial and fungal infections. However, nematode parasites are considered one the biggest threats to human health, causing diseases leading to death. Even when they are not killing, they could stay in the host and cause chronic diseases. Lymphatic filariasis is such an example which is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti (filarial nematode).
Jennifer Gleason
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS USA
jgleason@ku.edu

My lab focuses on the genetics of behavior, primarily in Drosophila. We are interested in the genetic changes resulting in behavioral isolation between species. To that end, we study courtship behaviors, primarily acoustic signals (courtship song) and pheromones.
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón
VectorBase Scientific Liaison/Outreach Manager
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
ggiraldo@nd.edu
VectorBase
I teach scientist at all career stages, students, postdocs, technicians, researchers, and faculty, how to use VectorBase data, tools and resources. I also teach how to manually annotate genes to submit them in VectorBase, we currently use Artemis but will soon host WebApollo too. Our developers are currently working on VectorBase Galaxy, soon will be teaching how to use it too.
Mr. JJ Hanly
Graduate Student
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambirdge Cambridge United Kingdom
jjh55@cam.ac.uk
Butterfly Genetics Group
I am interested the role of regulatory mutations in evolution of morphology. I investigate this using the red pattern elements of the wings of Heliconius butterflies.
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
J. Spencer Johnston
Professor
Entomology/Genetics
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
spencerj@tamu.edu
We estimate do Genome Size Estimates for genomics projects
My primary interest is in genome size evolution and genome architecture. The Alab specializes in Arthropod genome size estimates, but routinely determinse genome size for a wide variety of organisms. We take pride in estimates that are timely, accurate and precise, and follow these estimates through to final publication of completed genomes, phylogenomic and genomic surveys. We also study population structure, working primarily on honey bees. These studies include microsatellite loci, SNPs, genomic and quantitative cytogenetics.
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Josephine Reinhardt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Biology
University of Maryland College Park
College Park MD USA
reinharj@umd.edu
http://igtrcn.org/participant/gerald-wilkinson/
I am currently studying several aspects of the genomics of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), which are best known as a model for sexual selection and meiotic drive. Recently, it was also discovered the T. dalmanni have a sex chromosome distinct from both the ancestral X and the X in Drosophila, making them an interesting comparative model for aspects of sex-chromosome evolution. We recently released a transcriptome assembly as part of an analysis that identified genes that are differentially regulated in males carrying a driving sex chromosome. We are currently assembling and annotating the T. dalmanni genome.
Dayalan Srinivasan
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Rowan University
Glassboro NJ USA
srinivasan@rowan.edu

We use the pea aphid, an insect that displays several polyphenisms, as our model for understanding the genetic, epigenetic cellular basis of phenotypic plasticity as well as its evolution.
Dr. Emmanuelle Jacquin-Joly
CV
EcoSens department iEES-Paris
INRA
Versailles cedex Yveline France
emmanuelle.jacquin@versailles.inra.fr
Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
My research focuses on insect chemoreception in a context of plant protection. My objectives are 1) to decipher the molecular mechanisms of olfaction and taste, focusing on chemosensory receptors, 2) to study the contribution of chemoreception to insect adaptation to new hosts and anthropic systems, 3) to investigate the evolutionary origin of insect chemosensory receptors. I am using an integrative approach from genes to behaviour, including genomics and transcriptomics approaches.
Steve Paterson
Professor
CV
Centre for Genomic Research
University of Liverpool
Liverpool Merseyside UK
s.paterson@liv.ac.uk
Centre for Genomic Research
Genomics and population genetics, particularly of host-parasite interactions. Bioinformatics, including RNAseq, de novo assembly and annotation. Sequenced Plodia interpunctella genome.
Kallare Arunkumar
Scientist
CV
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics
Hyderabad Telangana India
arun@cdfd.org.in
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
During the last one decade, research in the silkworm, Bombyx mori has witnessed explosive developments which include unveiling of complete genome sequence; availability of large amount of transcirptomics resources through ESTs, microarray and RNAseq; high density linkage and physical maps; map-based cloning; well-established piggyBac mediated transgenics; TALENs based gene disruption systems; and identification of critical genes for proliferation of baculovirus. The concomitant advancements in other insects such as Drosophila, Honeybee, Mosquito, and Tribolium, particularly in understanding sex-determination mechanisms, microRNA functions, molecular mechanisms of immune response pathways and RNAi-based analysis of gene functions, provide impetus to build silkworm as a basic
Peter Atkinson
Professor
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
peter.atkinson@ucr.edu
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
Arnaud Martin
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California Berkley
BERKELEY CA USA
heliconiuswing@gmail.com
Evolution and Development of butterflies and moths
I am a developmental biologist who specializes in evolutionary studies of the genotype-phenotype map, in particular in non-model organisms of ecological interest. I am particularly interested in the generative mechanisms of evolutionary change and use a combination of comparative, genomic and developmental tools in lepidopterans to tackle how the genetic properties of living systems generate variation and biodiversity.
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
Marc Halfon
Associate Professor
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
mshalfon@buffalo.edu

My laboratory maintains an active research program divided between Drosophila molecular genetics and computational/bioinformatics. Current research in the laboratory falls into three main areas: (a) discovery and characterization of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in Drosophila and other holometabolous insects, (b) promoter-CRM interactions, and (c) mechanisms of specificity for receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, with a focus on mesoderm development. I am also the developer and curator of the REDfly database of Drosophila transcriptional regulatory elements and as such am active in the field of genome annotation and in providing community-accessible database resources.
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA
adingwall@luc.edu

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Koen Venken
Assistant Professor
Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston TX United States
kv134369@bcm.edu
Team Venken
Genetic Manipulation, Genome Engineering, Synthetic Biology, and Human Disease Modeling in Drosophila melanogaster
Haobo Jiang
Professor
CV
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
haobo.jiang@okstate.edu
Insect Molecular Biology Lab
1. Extracellular serine protease network in Manduca sexta; 2. Prophenoloxidase structure, function, activation, and regulation by serpins; 3. Insect genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and microRNA studies; 4. Other aspects of insect immunity including pathogen recognition, signal transduction, antimicrobial effectors, cellular responses, and so on. ,
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Marcé Lorenzen
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
marce_lorenzen@ncsu.edu
Marce Lorenzen Lab
To elucidate the molecular mechanism that underlies a class of novel selfish-genetic element found only in Tribolium. Due to the selfish behavior of these elements they have potential as gene "drivers" to push pesticide susceptibility into populations of insect pests of crops, or vector incompetence into populations of insect vectors of disease.
Alfred Handler
Research Geneticist
faculty
Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Gainesville FL United States
al.handler@ars.usda.gov
none
Our research is focused on understanding and manipulating the genes of tephritid fruit flies, a group of invasive pests of significant agricultural importance. We study transposable elements and their use as vectors for germ-line transformation, and development of new vector systems for genomic targeting and transgene stability.
Dr. Christina Grozinger
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
College of Agricultural Sciences
University Park PA United States
cmgrozinger@psu.edu
Grozinger Lab
My program seamlessly integrates research, education, outreach and service related to the biology and health of honey bees and other pollinators.  My research addresses both basic and applied questions, using a highly trans-disciplinary approach encompassing genomics, physiology, neurobiology, behavior, and chemical ecology.  My program consists of two main areas of study, which examine the mechanisms underlying social behavior and health in honey bees and related species.  Our studies on social behavior seek to elucidate the proximate and ultimate mechanisms that regulate complex chemical communication systems in insect societies.  Our studies on honey bee health examine how biotic and abiotic stressors
Dr. Susan Brown
Distinguished Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
sjbrown@ksu.edu
Brown Lab
The Brown lab is using the Irys high-throughput genome mapping platform from BioNano Genomics to improve the Tribolium castaneum genome.
Dr. Jennifer Brisson
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY United States
jbrisso3@bio.rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
genetic mapping and association mapping using Illumina data, as well as Illumina (RNA-Seq) studies; in situ hybridization of RNA to embryos, methyl-Seq
Dr. Thomas Kaufman
Distinguished Professor of Biology
faculty
Department of Biology
Indiana University Bloomington
Bloomington IN USA
kaufman@indiana.edu
Kaufman Lab
Using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the long-term goal of our laboratory is to contribute to an understanding of the genetic basis of the developmental program of higher organisms. The homeotic genes, which play a crucial role in development, have been our principal locus. Our research areas include chromatin, chromosomes, and genome integrity; developmental mechanisms and regulation in eukaryotic systems; and eukaryotic cell biology, cytoskeleton and signaling.
Dr. Zach N. Adelman
Associate Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
zachadel@tamu.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in my laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.