Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Farkhanda Manzoor
prof
CV
zoology
Lahore college for women university, Lahore
LAHORE PUNJAB Pakistan
doc_farkhanda@yahoo.com
Entomology Research Lab
She is known for her research on Taxonomy, biology and integrated management (control) of urban insect pests such as termites, mosquitoes, cockroaches, ants etc. She has introduced termite baiting in Pakistan and has been working with resistance to insecticides against mosquitoes, cockroaches and flies.
Fotini Koutroumpa
ECOSENS, iEES-Paris
INRA Versailles
Versailles Ille de France France
fotini.koutroumpa@gmail.com

I am interested in the characterization of genes involved in insects' chemosensation and particularly the ones involved in pheromone and food perception
Kevin Deem
Mr.
Biology
Miami University
Oxford Ohio United States
deemkd@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu Lab
Because of a large gap in the fossil record, a debate on the origin of insect wings has roared on for more than 200 years between two competing hypotheses: tergal or pleural origin. Recent molecular evidence has provided support for a dual-origin of insect wings. I aim to investigate the contribution of two distinct wing serial homologs to ectopic wing formation in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, to further inform the dual-origin hypothesis of insect wings. Tribolium castaneum is an emerging model system which has been shown to bare two distinct wing serial homologs on the wingless first thoracic
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
Michael Smanski
Assistant Professor
Department of Biochem, Mol Biol, and Biophys and the Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St Paul MN USA
smanski@umn.edu

Our group has developed novel strategies to control gene flow between engineered and wild populations.
Maciej Maselko
Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St. Paul MN USA
mmaselko@umn.edu

I am developing Synthetic Incompatibility; an approach for engineering species-like barriers in sexually reproductive organisms. Synthetic Incompatibility has applications for transgene biocontainment in plants engineered to produce high-value compounds and for controlling pest species such as mosquitoes and invasive fish.
Isabella Schember
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
ilschemb@buffalo.edu
Halfon Lab, PhD candidate
I am currently a PhD candidate and I am interested in studying gene regulatory network evolution and regulatory genomics of various insects.
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
Ayman Ahmed
Mr
CV
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM)
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
zoologist05@gmail.com
Vector behaviour and genomics
Mosquito Population genetics and Mosquito-borne Viral Diseases.
Atif Manzoor
Assistant Professor (IPFP, HEC)
Agricultural Biotechnology Division
National Institute of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Pujnab Pakistan
atif1903@yahoo.com

My basic research interests are the proteomic and transcriptomic studies of parasitoid venoms and isolation of bioactive genes present in the venom glands.
Karthikeyan Ramiaah
Biological Sciences and Bio Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur
Kanpur Uttarpradesh India
krthkyn@iitk.ac.in
Brain Lab
I will be focussing on using latest genetic engineering tools to edit the genes that code for olfactory receptors. Especially CRISPR cas9 mediated genome editing.
Austin Compton
Biochemistry
Virginia Tech
Newport Virginia United States
austc14@vt.edu

I am interested in delineating the biological mechanism of sex determination in different Anopheles mosquitoes by characterizing the role of male-determining (M) factors.
Sheina Sim
Research Biologist
CV
Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research
USDA-ARS
Hilo HI USA
ssim8@hawaii.edu

Integrating of genetic, genomic, and genome editing techniques to improve methods for tephritid fruit fly invasion pathway analysis, control, and eradication.
Nicole Gutzmann
Graduate Student
Entomology
NCSU
Raleigh NC United States
negutzma@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
Functional and social analysis of pest management technologies and their development
Johan Ariff Mohtar
Mr
CV
Department of Chemical Engineering Technology (Industrial Biotechnology)
Universiti Malaysia Perlis
Kampus UniCiti Alam, Sungai Chuchuh, Padang Besar Perlis Malaysia
joarach82@gmail.com
Tissue Culture and Biomolecular Laboratory
For the past two years, I have been engaging in the spider silk research for tissue engineering application. Spider silk gland from the basal lineage of spider species provides a promising platform as a potential bioreactor for recombinant protein production. I am pursuing a PhD study in the effort of developing transgenic social spiders for such purpose
Neal Dittmer
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
ndittmer@ksu.edu

I’m interested in exploring how insects make their cuticle (exoskeleton). My main focus is on the proteins present in the cuticle and how they differ between cuticle that is hard versus cuticle that is flexible. I am also interested on how these cuticular proteins may be cross-linked together to help stabilize the cuticle (a process known as sclerotization). One important enzyme in this process is laccase, a member of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family. Many insects have multiple MCO genes and their physiological functions are unknown but likely extend beyond sclerotization. Understanding how the insect cuticle is made may lead
Michael O. Kusimo
Dr.
CV
Independent researcher
IITA, Benin Station
Ifako-Ogba Lagos Nigeria
gkusimo@gmail.com

1. Molecular detoxification mechanisms in insect vectors and development of new reagents to overcome insecticide resistance 2. Assessment of new model organisms 3. Mapping of the distribution of mosquito-borne pathogens 4. Chromosomal gene screening and testing 5. Directed evolution of genes 6. Understanding the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial resistance genes 7. Development of amber temperature stable enzymes
Iliya Ndams
Prof.
Department of Zoology
Ahmadu Bello University Zaria
Zaria Kaduna State Nigeria
isndams@abu.edu.ng
Parasitology/Entomology Research Laboratory
Ecology and control of mosquitoes, tseste fly, blackfly, sandfly
Travis van Warmerdam
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entemology and Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS United States
tcv34@msstate.edu
King Lab
I am interested in developing transgenic methods for the manipulation of invertebrate genomes. I am currently developing a gene drive plasmid in a Coleopteran species.
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Wiem BEN AMARA
Biology
Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar
Tunis El Manar Tunisia
wiem.benamara7@gmail.com
Unité de recherche de génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures
study of transposable elements in insects
Karen Kemirembe
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
kuk195@psu.edu
Rasgon Lab
Investigating how Wolbachia pipientis affects mosquito susceptibility to mosquito viruses.
Gajalakshmi Muthu
CV
of Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
Bangalore  karanataka India
gajalakshmiagri@gmail.com

Molecular Entomology, Insecticide Resistance, Taxonomy
Anna Buchman
Project Scientist
Department of Entomology
UC Riverside
Riverside CA USA
annabuch@ucr.edu
Akbari Lab
I am currently working to develop replacement and suppression gene drive systems in fruit flies and mosquitoes.
Pinky Kain Sharma
Principal investigator (Wellcome Trust DBT intermediate Fellow)
Department of Genetics and Neurobiology
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, India
Faridabad Haryana India
pinkykain@gmail.com
Laboratory of Genetics and Neurobiology
For any animal, learning about food is an important mechanism that provide animals flexibility in food choices for better survival, hence, it is extremely important to understand how the taste information is represented in the brain.I am interested in understanding how insects make the feeding decisions. This involves identifying neuronal taste circuits in the brain downstream of gustatory sensory neurons that influence feeding behaviors. Physiological state and other factors can act on the gustatory cells and circuits and can modulate taste signals, but these are not well understood in insects. Using Drosophila melanogaster, I will explore into these mechanisms for greater understanding
Rubina Chongtham
Botany
University of Delhi
Delhi Delhi India
chrubina1@yahoo.co.in

Aphids are important crop pests. Understanding plant-aphid interactions can give great insights into not only aphid biology, but also methods of crop-protection. My focus is on using transcriptomics and functional genomics in order to develop improved plant variety using RNAi.
Sarah Hamm
Biosciences
University of Exeter
Penryn Cornwall UK
sh580@exeter.ac.uk

Investigating the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua
Heath Blackmon
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
coleoguy@gmail.com

I am interested in chromosome evolution, specifically, sex chromosome and chromosome number evolution. To address these topics, I use a broad range of approaches including theoretical population genetics, applied phylogenetics, and bioinformatics.
Arvind Sharma
Post-Doctoral Associate
CV
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
reno NEVADA US
arvindsharma.phd@gmail.com

My research is focused on understanding questions related to vector ecology and use of the novel techniques to modify the genome of Ixodes scapularis
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Cheolho Sim
Associate Professor
Biology
Baylor University
Waco Texas United States
cheolho_sim@baylor.edu
Vector Biology
Currently, the Sim’s lab focuses on Vector Biology using a combination of genetic, molecular, cell biological and bioinformatical approaches. The two broad areas of work in our laboratory are (1) functional genomics studies of arthropod vectors of human pathogens and (2) diapause research on the mosquito Culex pipiens, which is the primary vector for West Nile encephalitis, Eastern equine encephalitis, and many arboviruses, as well as lymphatic filariases. Within the temperate zones, mosquitoes are limited temporally to just a few months of active development. The remaining months are spent in a dormancy period known as diapause. Depending on the species, mosquito
sanket deshmukh
AGROCHEMICAL AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY
nagpur maharstra india
sssanketdeshmukh@gmail.com

insilico study for pest managment
Janneke Bloem
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University The Netherlands
Wageningen x Netherlands
janneke.bloem@wur.nl

Entomology
Glady Samuel
Entomology
Texas A&M
College Station TX USA
hsamuel@tamu.edu

Vector Borne diseases, Vector Viral Interactions, Mosquito Antiviral pathways
Yoshinori Tomoyasu
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
Miami University
Oxford OH USA
tomoyay@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu lab
My research interests revolve around understanding the molecular basis underlying morphological evolution. We use insect wings as a model, and investigate the emergence and divergence of this evolutionary critical structure, that has made insects one of the most successful group of animals on this planet. We also study the systemic aspect of RNA interference (RNAi) in insects. RNAi, in which dsRNA suppresses the translation of homologous mRNA, is a highly conserved cellular defense mechanism. In some organisms, the RNAi response can be transmitted systemically from cell to cell, a phenomenon termed ‘systemic RNAi’. Understanding systemic RNAi will be crucial for the
Andrew Hammond
Research Associate
Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London Greater London United Kingdom
andrew.hammond08@imperial.ac.uk
Crisanti Lab
Gene drives in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae
joe kramer
Instructor/director
pathology
rwjms
piscataway  nj usda
kramerjo@rwjms.rutgers.edu

Epitranscriptomics
Jeff Demuth
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington Texas United States
jpdemuth@uta.edu
Demuth Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics. Speciation. Sex chromosome evolution. Gene family evolution. Sexual selection.
OLABISI ALAMU
Mr
CV
Plant Gemetic Resources
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology (NACGRAB)
iBADAN OYO STATE Nigeria
bisialamu@gmail.com
Seed Testing Laboratory
PhD student with the Department of Crop,Soil and Pest Management,Federal University Technology Akure( FUTA),Nigeria and a Senior Research Scientist with the NACGRAB. The current research seek to develop innovative compounds from botanicals for the control of fruit and vegetative pests of vegetables and fruit crops in Sub Sahara Africa( SSA)
Il Hwan Kim
Postdoc Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
ROCKVILLE  MD United States
il-hwan.kim@nih.gov

Mosquito salivary and hemolymph proteins
Misato Miyakawa
Dr.
Center for Bioscience Research and Education, Laboratory of Environmental Physiology
Utsunomiya University
Utsunomiya Tochigi Japan
misatorus@gmail.com

Invasive ants
Vakil Ahmad
Dr.
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia Missouri USA
v.ahmad@outlook.com
Zhang Bing Laboratory
I am focused on the role of glial cells in Drosophila sleep behavior through Neurogenetics. In order to decipher the role of glial cells in fruit fly behaviors such as locomotion and sleep, and to gain an insight into glia-neural interaction underlying regulatory mechanisms for these behaviors, we use a “cell-centric” forward genetic approach to identify the subset glia through studying sleep behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. We hypothesize that specific glial cells are crucial for various sleep characteristics by modulating the functionality of specific neurons. We genetically manipulate subset glia within a broad glial-specific repo-Gal4 expression pattern using the FINGR (Flippase-induced
Muhammad Asif Qayyoum
Dr.
CV
ENTOMOLOGY DEPARTMENT
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad (PAK.)
University of Kentucky (USA)
FAISALABAD PUNJAB PAKISTAN
asifqayyoum@gmail.com
MUHAMMAD ASIF QAYYOUM
Soil/manure inhabiting mites taxonomy of mites parasitic mites
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
John Beckmann
Dr.
CV
Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Yale University
New Haven Connecticut USA
john.beckmann@yale.edu

I study the molecular mechanism of Wolbachia induced cytoplasmic incompatibility in insects. With respect to this I seek to develop transgenes that will be effective genetic units for induction of sterility and application of the sterile insect technique.
Rafael Homem
Biological Chemistry and Crop Protection Department
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden England United Kingdom
rafael.homem@rothamsted.ac.uk

Insecticide resistance
Ines Elena Martin-Martin
Postdoc Visiting Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratoy of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/National Institutes of Health
Rockville Maryland United States
ines.martin-martin@nih.gov

My research focuses on the study of insect's salivary proteins and their relationship with blood-feeding process and transmission of vector-borne pathogens.
sharrine marra
CV
Entomology
Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso
Rondonópolis Mato Grosso Brazil
sharrine.oliveira@hotmail.com

Insecticide resistence; biotecnology; entomology
Kolja Neil Eckermann
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
keckerm1@uni-goettingen.de

Development of new environmental friendly methods and techniques to improve pest and disease vector control.
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Wendy Smith
Associate Professor and Interim Chair
Biology
Northeastern University
Boston MA USA
w.smith@neu.edu

Regulation of insect growth, development, and immunity
Kumaresan Ramanathan
Associate Professor
CV
Biochemistry Unit,Institute of Biomedical Science,College of Health Sciences
Mekelle University (Ayder Campus)
Mekelle Tigray Region Ethiopia
kumaresanramanatha@gmail.com
Biomarkers Research Lab
1. Study on Regulation of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Metabolism using PCSK9 Gene Silencing Initially we have done this study in computational approach and the results were quite interesting. Background & Aim: With nearly 32.4 million people are affected every year with Myocardial infarction (MI), Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) and strokes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to abnormal lipid metabolism. Combating and preventing abnormality in lipid metabolism becomes a pivotal criteria for research. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulating protein, it promotes the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL-R) and hence increases LDL-C levels. Mutations that block the
Elisabeth Marchal
Biology - research group of Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
KU Leuven
Leuven Vl-Brabant Belgium
elisabeth.marchal@bio.kuleuven.be

Regulation of lipophilic hormone biosynthesis, ecdysteroids, juvenile hormones. Signal transduction of JH, 20E, cross-talk and interaction with insulin like peptides. Neuropeptides and their GPCRs.
Vikas Suman
Dr.
CV
Insect Cytogenetics
GOVERNMENT DEGREE COLLEGE, NERWA
District Shimla Himachal Pradesh INDIA
viks_suman@yahoo.co.in

My research focus on cytological characterization of holocentric chromosomes in Heteropteran insetcs, using C-banding and Fluorescent staining. We identify cytological markers in different families of Heteroptera used to differentiate species which are morphological alike. Also the study help us to classify families which are alike in cytological behaviour not just of morphological characters.
Mohammad Asaduzzaman Miah
PhD Scholar
CV
Insect Molecular Biology, College of Plant Protection
Nanjing Agricultural University
Nanjing Jiangsu China
2014202051@njau.edu.cn
Insect Physiology and Molecular Biology
Molecular mechanism of Insecticide resistance, Functional expression (invitro) of metabolic (detoxification) enzymes ( the genes of CYP450 families) which responsible for insecticide resistance as well as to find out the activities of metabolites (Chemicals/insecticides) in insect body.
Nagraj Sambrani
Postdoc
CV
Lab of Molecular genetics
CDFD, Hyderabad, India
Hyderabad Telengana india
loginnagraj@gmail.com
LMG
My Current Project A major challenge in developmental biology is the elucidation of how changes in patterning mechanisms have contributed to the evolution of morphology. The insect wing is a fascinating developmental system in which to study this question, because of presence of vast diversification in insect wing morphologies. The proposed research will compare
Wendy Moore
Assistant Professor, Insect Systematics and Curator
Department of Entomology
University of Arizona
Tucson Arizona United States
wmoore@email.arizona.edu

Dr. Wendy Moore and her lab members investigate the evolution and ecology of terrestrial arthropods. Specific projects focus on arthropod systematics. We use molecular genetic techniques and morphological methods to infer robust phylogenetic frameworks to identify and describe natural groups of terrestrial arthropods, to study their diversification and patterns of distribution, and to elucidate their ecological roles and to assess the impact of key innovations on their evolutionary histories.
Conor McMeniman
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
cmcmeni1@jhu.edu

My group studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving mosquito attraction to humans, and the impact of pathogen infection on mosquito olfactory perception and behavior.
Osama Bin manzoor
Entomology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan  Hubei  China
osmamanzoor11@hotmail.com

RNAi is a important tool to combat Insect Pests
Anyi Mazo-Vargas
PhD student
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY US
am2622@cornell.edu
Laboratory of evolution of animal color patterns
I work with wing color patterns in butterflies to answer questions related to the evolution of gene regulation and developmental re-patterning. In my project I am using a mix of old school methods as: in-situ hybridization, antibody stains, drug treatments; and new genomics techniques as: ATAC-seq, RNA-seq and CRISPR-Cas9.
Leela Alamalakala
Research Scientist
Biotechnology R&D
Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Co. Ltd.
Jalna Maharashtra India
leela.alamalakala@gmail.com
Molecular Entomology Lab
Plant-Insect Interactions, Plant defense responses to phloem-feeding insects, Functional genomics
Luciano Cosme
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
luciano.cosme@yale.edu
Powell's Lab
Mosquito evolutionary genetics. Gene and miR expression.
Woo Jae Kim
Assistant Professor
CV
Cellular and Molecular Medicine
University of Ottawa
Ottawa ON Canada
wkim@uottawa.ca
Kim lab
In short, the Kim lab is seeking for the fundamental mechanisms how specific neural circuits lead to certain behaviors. We use tiny insect Drosophila melanogaster to answer this question. Dr. Kim has established two behavioral paradigm called ‘Longer-Mating-Duration’ and ‘Shorter-Mating-Duration’. In short term, the Kim lab will focus on identifying functional neural circuits, genetic components, and sensory modality for these behaviors. In mid term, the Kim lab would expand the behavioral repertoires by establishment of automated quantification system of behavior. Beyond this, the Kim lab will establish automated optogenetic & thermogenetic behavioral manipulation system. With the advantage of strong genetic
Richard Meisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Biochemistry
University of Houston
Houston TX United States
rpmeisel@uh.edu

Evolutionary genomics of sex chromosomes, sex determination, and sexual dimorphism in flies.
Rolando Rivera-Pomar
Professor and Investigator
Centro de Bioinvestigaciones
Universidad Nacional del Noroeste de Buenos Aires / National Science and Technology Research Council (CONICET)
Centro Regional de Estudios Genómicos
Pergamino Buenos Aires Argentina
rrivera@unnoba.edu.ar
Genetics and functional genomics
Our laboratory is interested in comparative genomics of insects. We study early developmental genes and their regulation with a focus on the segmentation process, insecticide resistance-related genes, and small peptides and neuropeptides in different insect species, some of them of medical and agricultural interest.
Christopher Cunningham
Ph.D.
Department of Genetics
University of Georgia, Athens
Athens GA USA
cbc83@uga.edu
Moore Laboratory
My research focuses on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, such as social dominance networks and parent-offspring interactions. My current model system is Nicrophorus vespilloides, a burying beetle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicrophorus_vespilloides). I am particularly interested in the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in these behaviors and their natural variation. I use many techniques to answer my questions of interest; including, bioinformatics, gene expression, and proteomic tools.
Taro Nakamura
Post-Doc / Ph.D
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
arumakanorat@gmail.com
Extavour lab
Insect development and evolution / Live imaging with transgenic cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus / Gene modification (Knock-in and Knock-out) with CRISPR/Cas system and TALENs in Gryllus / Transgenics using piggyBac transposase /
Ewan CAMPBELL
Dr
School of Biological Sciences
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen Aberdeen City United Kingdom
e.m.campbell@abdn.ac.uk
Bowman Lab
I am interested in applying RNAi and gene silencing techniques to the field of agricultural and livestock pests with a focus on the major parasite of Honey bees, the Varroa mite. I have developed RNAi targets and delivery mechanisms in a range of species including Sea Lice, Ticks and mites. I am also interested in utilising RNAi and gene manipulation for the study of physiological pathways in ectoparasites, such as in host sensing, reproductive cues and blood feeding.
Takaaki Daimon
PhD
Insect Growth Regulation Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Japan
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
daimontakaaki@affrc.go.jp

Insect genetics and endocrinology
Ademir Martins
PhD
CV
Laficave
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ)
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
ademirjr@ioc.fiocruz.br
Lab of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors
Insecticide resistance mechanisms in insects of medical importance
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Ferdinand NANFACK MINKEU
Mr
Parasitology and Mycology
Pasteur
Paris Paris 15 France
nanleplot@yahoo.fr

My researches are focused on host-pathogen interactions in African malaria mosquito. Transgenic tools to fight malaria Modification of Tribolium castaneum and Sitophilus oryzae for SIT control
Hector Quemada
Director, Biosafety Resource Network
Institute for International Crop Improvement
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
St. Louis MO USA
hquemada@danforthcenter.org

My area of work is the regulation of genetically engineered organisms, including transgenic insects and transgenic crops.
Angela Meccariello
Ph.D. student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Naples 'Federico II'
Naples Italy Italy
angela.meccariello@unina.it
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Genetics and transcriptomics of sex determination in pest insects: Aedes albopictus Ceratitis capitata Phlebotomus perniciosus
Peter Piermarini
Assistant Professor
Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
piermarini.1@osu.edu

My lab investigates the molecular physiology of mosquito vectors with a focus on the excretory system.
Mahadeva swamy H M
Dr.
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bengaluru Karnataka INDIA
clintonbio@gmail.com
Bio-Pesticide Lab
Integrated Pest management, Coleoptera and plant parasitic nematodes control, Bacillus thuringiensis, RNAi in insect pest management, Formulation of agrochemicals,
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Muhammad Akmal
Insect genetic diversity and infection with endosymbionts
CV
Entomology
Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan
Multan Punjab Pakistan
akmal07bzu@gmail.com
lab. of Insect Microbiology and Molecular Biology,
I am working on genetics of Amrasca devastans and its infection with wolbachia.
Alicia Timm
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
aetimm@gmail.com

I investigate insect-plant interactions, focussing on plant resistance and insect response to viruses. I also research the taxonomy and population genetics of agriculturally important insects.
Pavan kumar
CV
Molecular Ecology
Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research
Ithaca New York United States
pavankumar.sk@gmail.com
Jander lab
1. Improving the potato tuber yield and quality. 2. Decoding the ecological role of plant defensive metabolites. 3. Elucidation of insect detoxification strategies.
Kalindu Ramyasoma
Post Graduate Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
Faculty of Science, University of Colombo
Colombo 03 Western Province Sri Lanka
kd.ramyasoma@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
My research interest focused to engineering RNA interference based resistant to all Dengue serotypes in Aedes aegypti vector mosquitos using transgenic technology. Genetic manipulation of Aedes mosquitos express RNAi genes in mosquito tissues under control of tissue specific promoters and genes repress or inhibits the expression of dengue viral proteins.
Sarah Maguire
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Belle Mead NJ United States
smaguire@Princeton.edu

I am broadly interested in the biological basis of behavior – especially through neurogenetic and evolutionary perspectives. The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is an ideal model system to study the biological basis of behavior because its attraction to human hosts makes it the number one vector of yellow and Dengue fever, the latter of which affects an estimated 50 million people per year! The goal of my research is to 1) determine the molecular basis of Aedes’s attraction to humans as well as 2) map the neural circuitry underlying Aedes’s attraction and repulsion behavior.
Dongho Kim
R&D
agroRNA
Seoul  N/A S. Korea
dkim.gp@gmail.com
CEO
RNAi/insect/plant/dsRNA production/dsRNA formulation/insectcide/herbicide/functional genomics
Isabel Campos
Fly Platform Manager
Fly Platfrom
Champalimaud Foundation
Lisboa Lisboa  Portugal
isabel.campos@neuro.fchampalimaud.org
CF Fly Platform
The CF Fly Platform contributes to CF researchers’ best performance by providing state of the art conditions for fly breeding, maintenance and manipulation, at the same time as offering a range of technical services conducted by a specialized team, headed by an experienced manager with more than 10 years of Drosophila genetics post doctoral training.
Konstantina Tsoumani
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
CV
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
kotsouma@bio.uth.gr
Molecular biology & Genomics - Mathiopoulos Lab
Genomic and transcriptomic analyses using NGS data, identification and functional analyses of genes involved 1) in reproductive behaviour including the olfactory and gustatory systems of the olive fruit fly, as well as 2) in embryogenesis, that can be used in the development of new genetic control strategies of the olive fly.
Adenike Adeyemo
Dr Mrs
Department of Biology, School of Sciences
Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
Akure,  Ondo State Nigeria
yemonike@yahoo.com
Food Storage Laboratory, Department of Biology
Stored products Entomology, Insect biochemistry with emphasis on mode of action of bio -pesticides in insects
Claudio Ramirez
Associate Professor
Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas
Universidad de Talca
Talca Talca Chile
clramirez@utalca.cl
Laboratorio de Interacciones Insecto-Planta
I am interested on insect-plant interactions emphasizing proximal (ecological) and distal (evolutionary) causes. This approach is intended to elucidate insect herbivory patterns in native and productive systems. From the proximal point of view, I have been studying behavioural and morphological mechanisms underlying insect-feeding patterns, as well as plant responses to insect herbivory. Concerning distal causes, I am looking for experimental or co-relational association between proximal causes and reproductive output, as well as their phylogenetic associations.
Keshava Mysore
PhD
CV
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine - University of Notre Dame
South Bend Indiana USA
kmysore@iu.edu
Duman-Scheel Lab
I am currently studying functional and developmental neurogenetics of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.
Muhammad Tayyib Naseem
CV
Agriculture Biotechnology Division
National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
tayyibnaseem@hotmail.com
Muhammad Naseem
DNA based identification of aphid species and vector-virus association analysis of aphid borne luteovirus
Donghun Kim
Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kp5091@ksu.edu
Arthropod Molecular Physiology Laboratory
I am now pursuing my PhD under the guidance of Dr. Yoonseong Park in the department of Entomology at Kansas State University. My PhD research is to investigate physiological mechanism of tick salivary secretion by using heterologous expression system, pharmacological /physiological technique and NGS analysis.
Maureen Gorman
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
mgorman@ksu.edu

Iron metabolism is a vital biological process in all eukaryotic organisms, but the mechanisms of iron metabolism in insects are poorly understood. Our research is focused on iron transport and the relationship between iron metabolism and innate immunity in insects. We use a combination of genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry methods to study iron metabolism and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Manduca sexta, and Tribolium castaneum. These studies should lead to a better understanding of two fundamental components of insect physiology and, thus, provide information that can be used in future efforts to control insect
David Majerowicz
Msc., PhD.
Faculdade de Farmacia
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
majerowicz@pharma.ufrj.br

Use of insect as models for lipid metabolsim and obesity; Role of nuclear receptors and hormones in the control of lipid metabolism; Role of nuclear receptors in the Rhodnius prolixus - Trypanossoma cruzi interaction.
Nasiru Ibrahim
Prof
Crop Science
Usmanu Danfodiyo University,Sokoto,Nigeria
Sokoto Sokoto Nigeria
dolegoronyo@yahoo.com

My interest is looking at different plants for thier potential in controlling insect pest of field and stored produce
philip Ndaloma
Lecturer
CV
Plant and Soil Sciences
Cuttington University
Monrovia Gbarnga  Liberia
firstnamephilipndaloma@yahoo.com

Climate change impact on the re-occurrence of army worm
Patricia Jumbo Lucioni
Postdoctoral research scholar
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN USA
patricia.jumbo@vanderbilt.edu
Postdoctoral Research Scholar-Broadie Lab
My current research field addresses the unknown mechanisms behind inborn errors of metabolism, classic galactosemia and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Patients with these disorders grow to develop neurodevelopmental complications of unknown mechanism which lack appropriate treatment. I use fruit flies as genetic models to characterize these phenotypes and elucidate disease mechanisms underlying these chronic inborn deficits.
John Marshall
MRC Research Fellow
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Imperial College London
London London UK
john.marshall@imperial.ac.uk

My research focuses on the use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. I have worked in a mosquito genetic engineering lab, and have developed mathematical models to describe the spread of anti-malaria genes through mosquito populations. I have also commentated on regulatory issues related to GM mosquitoes capable of spreading across international borders, and conducted the first public attitude survey on perspectives of people in Africa to GM mosquitoes for malaria control. Results from this survey suggested people would be supportive of GM mosquitoes that have been shown to work in confined field trials. This
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Kajan Muneeswaran
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
University of Colombo
Colombo Western province Sri Lanka
kajan.muneeswaran@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
Developing transgenic mosquitoes resistant to all four dengue viral serotypes in Sri Lanka by RNA interference pathway which can be activated by the blood-meal in female mosquitoes to combat against the #1 killer dengue disease which kills more than 200 annually.
Scott Emrich
Computer Science and Engineering
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
semrich@nd.edu

Arthropod bioinformatics with a focus on vectors and ecologically important genome improvement/analysis
Alex Mak
asdf
asdf
Baltimore Maryland USA
almak1@umbc.edu

asdf
Alekos Simoni
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London London United Kingdom
a.simoni@imperial.ac.uk

Applying state of the art molecular biology to vector control with the aim of reducing malaria transmission
Brian Counterman
Biological Sciences
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS USA
bcounterman@biology.msstate.edu

Evolution, Population Genomics, Speciation
Hassan M. Ahmed
Developmental Biology
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
hmutasi@biologie.uni-goettingen.de
Wimmer Lab
My research focus in the use of developmental and molecular biology techniques to develop eco-friendly transgenic insect control strategies that can be used to fight insect of economical and public health importance (agricultural pest, diseases vectors).
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Cain Yam
Drosophila Division
BestGene Inc
Chino Hills CA USA
cain@thebestgene.com
BestGene Inc
Drosophila Microinjection Services
Vassiliki Bariami
Dr.
CV
Bioresources Project-Group
Justus Liebig University
Giessen Hessen Germany
vassiliki.bariami@ime.fraunhofer.de
Risk Assessment of Transgenics
In my early scientific pursuits my main focus has been the unveiling of genes and pathways implicated in insect and more specifically, mosquito insecticide resistance establishment. Having seen first hand that resistance development is rapidly undermining mosquito control efforts my research interest and focus have shifted towards the development of eco- friendly transgene based tools for mosquito management .
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
Ariel Chipman
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Israel Israel
ariel.chipman@huji.ac.il

Arthropod evo-devo
Philip Batterham
Professor
Genetics Dept/Bio21 Institute
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
p.batterham@unimelb.edu.au
Systems biology of the insect:insecticide interface
There are three areas of research in my lab:- 1. The biology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are targeted by insecticides including neonicotinoids and spinosyns. 2. The systems biology of neonicotinoid metabolism and transport combining genetic and metabolomic approaches. 3. Pest insect genomics. Specifically we work on the flesh fly, Lucilia cuprina, and the moth, Helicoverpa armigera. Much of our research is conducted in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster, however we do bioassay the function of pest genes expressed in this species.
John Masly
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
University of Oklahoma
Norman OK U.S.A.
masly@ou.edu

The primary goal of the research performed in my lab is to understand the mechanisms that generate biodiversity. We use molecular and genomic technologies to study how genetic change directs the development of differences between species and ultimately gives rise to two important evolutionary processes— speciation and phenotypic evolution. We study four closely related species of fruit flies that belong to the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, which allows us to take advantage of the arsenal of genetic, genomic, and molecular tools available in D. melanogaster. More recently, we have begun to develop North American damselflies in the genus Enallagma as
David Haymer
Professor
CV
Cell and Molecular Biology
University of Hawaii
Honolulu HI USA
dhaymer@hawaii.edu
Haymer lab
Molecular population genetics, molecular taxonomy of species complexes, Bactrocera dorsal is complex, Tephritidae
William Stumph
Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
San Diego State University
San Diego CA USA
wstumph@mail.sdsu.edu

My lab studies the formation of RNA polymerase II and RNA polymerase III transcription pre-initiation complexes on genes that code for the small nuclear RNAs (U1-U6). We are interested in the molecular mechanisms that determine the RNA polymerase specificity of these genes (Pol II on U1-U5 versus Pol III on U6). We particularly study the snRNA gene-specific transcription factor SNAPc that binds about 40 to 60 base pairs upstream of both classes of genes.
Derric Nimmo
Product Development Manager
Public Health Research
Oxitec
Abingdon Milton Park United Kingdom
derric.nimmo@oxitec.com

My career has given me a broad background in insect and parasite molecular biology. My PhD. looked for novel mechanisms of drug resistance in Leishmania sp. leading to postdoctoral work that concentrated on the genetic transformation of mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti, An, stephensi and An, gambiae) and the development of site-specific integration systems for genes. I started at Oxitec in 2005 as Head of Public Health Research with the aim of developing new RIDL systems in mosquitoes, supported by a Gates grant of $5 million. From this work we produced the new products in mosquitoes and published this work in Nature
Sujai Kumar
Dr
CV
Institute of Evolutionary Biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Edinburgh United Kingdom
sujaikumar@gmail.com
Blaxter Lab
Building a lepidopteran genome analysis and interrogation environment
Mitch McVey
Associate professor
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
mitch.mcvey@tufts.edu
The McVey lab
We use Drosophila to study DNA repair and recombination. We are particularly interested in the mechanisms by which alternative end-joining and recombinational repair of double-strand breaks results in mutagenesis and genome instability.
Gulsaz Shamim
CV
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
gulsazshamim@gmail.com
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
Gianluca Tettamanti
Associate Professor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
University of Insubria
Varese --- Italy
gianluca.tettamanti@uninsubria.it
Laboratory of Invertebrate Biology
- Cell death and regeneration in insect development - Insect biotechnology - Immune response in insects
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran
m.ghafourim@yahoo.com

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
Graham Thompson
Associate Professor
Biology
Western University
London Ontario Canada
graham.thompson@uwo.ca
The Social Biology Group
My lab studies the biological basis of insect social behaviour; how it evolves, how it is maintained and why some species are social while others are not. Much like human societies, eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites show bewildering complexity in how their societies are structured. Yet for insects, this complexity is derived from an economically simple division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive specialists. Studying reproductive division of labour in insects at the level of the gene can provide key insights into how complex social systems evolved from simpler, ancestral ones. Studies on social insects can also help understand
Leigh Boardman
Dr
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Fl USA
lboardman@ufl.edu

Integrative and comparative biology, genotype-phenotype interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying organismal tolerance to environmental stressors
Subbarayalu Mohankumar
Professor
Plant biotechnology
Tamil Nadu agricultural university
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
Smktnau@gmail.com
Molecular ecology
Molecular ecology of crop- pest interactions, diversity of pollinators , IPM, pest genetics and genomics
CRISTINA MANJON
Postdoctoral Researcher
Insect toxicology and Resistance
Bayer CropScience
Monheim NRW Germany
cristina.manjon@bayer.com
Insect toxicology and Resistance Lab
I am a researcher part of the Resistance Management team working closely with Ralf Nauen at Bayer CropScience. I am interested in the study of the detoxification mechanisms that operate in beneficials as well as in different pest species that develop insecticide resistance. In order to carry out this research we rely on different techniques for genetic profiling (microarrays, RNAseq, real-time PCR, etc.), as well as on gene silencing approaches such as RNA interference (RNAi technology, dsRNA).
Philipp Lehmann
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyväskylä
Jyväskylä Central Finland Finland
philipp.lehmann@jyu.fi

My research area covers both behavioral and physiological aspects of survival in and expansion to environments with large seasonal fluctuations. I primarily study energetic and immunity related stress responses during insect diapause in high latitude environments.
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Mauro Mandrioli
PhD
Life Sciences
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Modena Italy Italy
mauro.mandrioli@unimo.it
Insect genetics and Biosciences Lab
Insect cytogenetics and microbiome analysis
Nancy Moran
Professor
Integrative Biology
University of Texas at Austin
Austin TX USA
nancy.moran@austin.utexas.edu
Nancy Moran
I study biology and evolution of insects especially symbiotic relationships. Main groups of interest are aphids, leafhoppers, and bees.
Ludvik Gomulski
Department of Biology and Biotechnology
University of Pavia
Pavia PV Italy
gomulski@unipv.it
Genetics and genomics of insects of economic and medical importance
We are using transcriptome data to analyze the molecular changes that accompany major physiological and behavioral changes such as maturation and mating in different insect species of medical and agricultural importance. We are particularly interested in transcriptional changes in olfactory related genes.
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Maarten Jongsma
Dr
Business Unit Bioscience
Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Center
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
maarten.jongsma@wur.nl
High throughput phenotyping plant resistance to insects
I am involved both in studies of insect behaviour on plants using videotracking technology and highly parallel arena plates as well as in GPCR olfactory and taste receptor studies based on a new microfluidic platform
Wannes Dermauw
Dr.
Crop Protection
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
wannes.dermauw@ugent.be
Acarology
The Acarology lab has a long tradition in studying fundamental and applied aspects of arthropod crop pests. One of the main achievements of our group was the establishment of a new resistance paradigm in arthropods, by documenting the role of heteroplasmy in insecticide resistance (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008). We have also documented the evolutionary adaptation to several xenobiotics, hereby often uncovering the mode of action of agrochemicals in spider mites (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008, 2012, Dermauw et al. 2012). In recent years, our group was one of the key players in a collaborative project to sequence and
Yannick Wurm
Lecturer
CV
Organismal Biology
Queen Mary University of London
London London United Kingdom
y.wurm@qmul.ac.uk
Ants, Genomes & Evolution
Social evolution, population genomics, bioinformatics
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Peter Armbruster
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC USA
paa9@georgetown.edu
Armbruster
Research in my lab is focused on understanding processes of phenotypic evolution in natural populations and the molecular bases of adaptation. Our approach to these questions is integrative. We perform a wide range of studies, including field ecology, quantitative and population genetics, and molecular physiology. We are currently studying the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus, a vector of both dengue fever and Chikungunya virus. Our research intersects with a variety of topics in both invasive species biology and medical entomology, and we are particularly interested in novel approaches that lie at the interface of these
Carolyn McBride
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ USA
lmcbride@rockefeller.edu

The molecular, neural, and evolutionary basis of insect behavior
Sara Oppenheim
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
American Museum of Natural History
NY NY USA
saraoppenheim@gmail.com

The evolution of host plant use and diet breadth in specialists and generalists.
Don Champagne
Associate Professor
Entomology/Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases
University of Georgia
Athens Georgia USA
dchampa@uga.edu
Champagne Lab
I am interested in characterizing salivary factors that facilitate blood feeding by arthropods. More specifically, I am interested in proteins and peptides that modulate vertebrate hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses.
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
ahmad jamal
Department of zoology
university of Peshawar
peshawar KPK pakistan
ahmadjamalafridi@gmail.com

Spider Teaxonomy
Sanyuan Ma
State Key Laboratory of Silkworm Genome Biology
Southwest University
Chongqing Chongqing P. R. China
masanyuan@hotmail.com

Genome editing, CRISPR/Cas9, TALEN, Bombyx mori, Silk gland, Bioreactor, Synthetic bilology.
Micky Mwamuye
Molecular Biology & Bioinformatics Unit/Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab
International Centre of insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Nairobi Kenya
mmwamuye@icipe.org
Postgraduate Student
My current research focus is on the biodiversity of Ticks and tick-borne zoonoses at human-livestock-wildlife interfaces.
Fiona Mumoki
PhD Student
Zoology and Entomology Department, Social Insect Research Group
University of Pretoria
Hatfield, Pretoria Gauteng South Africa
nelimafiona@yahoo.com

I am interested in chemical communication in honeybee reproductive dominance
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
cmerlin@bio.tamu.edu
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Dr. Rakesh Mishra
CV
CCMB
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad Telangana India
mishra@ccmb.res.in
Senior Principal Scientist and Group Leader
We are interested in understanding how non-coding part of the genome, including repetitive sequences, brings about cell type specific is packaging and how once this packaging established it is maintained by epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms. We use Hox gene complexes as loci in model systems, Drosophila and zebrafish, to address theses issues address evolution of complexity in animals. By analyzing the genome organization in the context of nuclear architecture we study the structural basis of cellular memory. We propose that embryonic development is setting up of functional form of genome (epigenome or cell type specific chromatin) starting from the stem cell
Kevin Temeyer
Research Molecular Biologist
CV
Agricultural Research Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Kerrville Texas USA
kevin.temeyer@ars.usda.gov
Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory
Incumbent is a Research Molecular Biologist in the Livestock Insects Research Unit of the Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory, Kerrville, Texas. The research is a component of ARS National Program 104 – Veterinary, Medical and Urban Entomology. Incumbent is Lead Scientist for the Biting Fly CRIS Project with objectives to 1) develop new attractants, repellents, and behavior modifying chemicals based on physiology of chemical reception; 2) evaluate efficacy of novel technologies for control of flies; and 3) determine interactions between flies and microorganisms that affect survival of the insects and their capability to transmit pathogens. Incumbent is Lead Scientist
Jeffrey Marcus
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg MB Canada
marcus@cc.umanitoba.ca
Evolutionary developmental genetics of butterflies
My research interests focus on the evolution of developmental mechanisms. My laboratory studies the genetic and developmental basis of phenotypic variation, primarily using colour pattern formation in butterflies and moths as a model system. We employ a variety of approaches in our experiments including genomics, molecular phylogenetics, transgenics, immunohistochemistry, and computational biology.
Anthony A. James
Distinguished Professor
Micro. Molec. Genet. and Molec. Biol. Biochem.
University of California
Irvine CA USA
aajames@uci.edu

We research vector-parasite interactions, mosquito molecular biology and practical approaches to controlling vector-borne diseases. We use molecular-genetic tools to develop synthetic approaches to interrupt pathogen transmission by mosquitoes. Our group developed mosquito transgenesis procedures and engineered genes that interfere with malaria parasite development in mosquitoes. We collaborated to develop RNAi-mediated approaches to prevent dengue virus transmission and population-suppression strains based on flightless females. We use bioinformatics to study the evolution of control DNA involved in regulating genes involved in hematophagy. We have a strong interest in what it takes to move laboratory science from the laboratory to the field.
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Björn Brembs
Prof. Dr.
Institute of Zoology - Neurogenetics
Universität Regensburg
Regensburg Bavaria Germany
bjoern@brembs.net

We are interested in the neurobiology of spontaneous behavioral choice and operant learning.
Prof. Dr. Ernst A. Wimmer
CV
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August University Goettingen
Goettingen Lower Saxony Germany
ewimmer@gwdg.de
Developmental Biology and Insect Biotechnology
The research in the department of developmental biology covers a variety of developmental and physiological processes (e.g. head development, brain development, limb development, segmentation, germ cell differentiation, development and function of stink glands, as well as olfaction), their molecular basis, and their evolutionary conservation or diversification. In addition, novel approaches to insect pest management are developed using developmental genes and molecular biology tools. The animal model systems used at the department include a series of arthropods: insects, crustaceans, spiders.
Kallare Arunkumar
Scientist
CV
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics
Hyderabad Telangana India
arun@cdfd.org.in
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
During the last one decade, research in the silkworm, Bombyx mori has witnessed explosive developments which include unveiling of complete genome sequence; availability of large amount of transcirptomics resources through ESTs, microarray and RNAseq; high density linkage and physical maps; map-based cloning; well-established piggyBac mediated transgenics; TALENs based gene disruption systems; and identification of critical genes for proliferation of baculovirus. The concomitant advancements in other insects such as Drosophila, Honeybee, Mosquito, and Tribolium, particularly in understanding sex-determination mechanisms, microRNA functions, molecular mechanisms of immune response pathways and RNAi-based analysis of gene functions, provide impetus to build silkworm as a basic
Arnaud Martin
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California Berkley
BERKELEY CA USA
heliconiuswing@gmail.com
Evolution and Development of butterflies and moths
I am a developmental biologist who specializes in evolutionary studies of the genotype-phenotype map, in particular in non-model organisms of ecological interest. I am particularly interested in the generative mechanisms of evolutionary change and use a combination of comparative, genomic and developmental tools in lepidopterans to tackle how the genetic properties of living systems generate variation and biodiversity.
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
Stephanie Mohr
Director of the DRSC
Genetics
Harvard Medical School
Boston MA USA
stephanie_mohr@hms.harvard.edu
Drosophila RNAi Screening Center & Genome Engineering Production Group
At the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC) and more recently founded Genome Engineering Production Group (GEPG), we focus on the use of and new developments in RNA interference (RNAi), the CRISPR/Cas system, and other functional genomics approaches, including genome engineering. We are a community-focused group dedicated to transferring technologies, know-how and research materials to others for their research. We also have a growing suite of software tools and databases. Our resources are developed primarily for use with Drosophila melanogaster but many of the same approaches, underlying software, research materials, etc. can be used for non-model insects.
David Marcey
Fletcher Jones Professor of Developmental Biology
CV
Biology
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks California USA
marcey@clunet.edu
Marcey Lab
The compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster consists of about 800 ommatidia in a polar arrangement around the dorsoventral (D-V) midline. Each ommatidium consists of eight photoreceptor cells arranged in a trapezoidal fashion with two mirror-symmetric forms, a dorsal form above the D-V midline, and a ventral form below. When differentiation of the ommatidia begins within the epithelium of the third instar larval eye-antennal imaginal disc, each ommatidium is a bilaterally symmetrical cluster of photoreceptor precursors polarized in the anteroposterior axis. These precursors become polarized on the D-V axis by proto-ommatidium rotation. The establishment of polarity along the D-V axis requires
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
kmichel@ksu.edu
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.
Dr. Thomas Kaufman
Distinguished Professor of Biology
faculty
Department of Biology
Indiana University Bloomington
Bloomington IN USA
kaufman@indiana.edu
Kaufman Lab
Using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the long-term goal of our laboratory is to contribute to an understanding of the genetic basis of the developmental program of higher organisms. The homeotic genes, which play a crucial role in development, have been our principal locus. Our research areas include chromatin, chromosomes, and genome integrity; developmental mechanisms and regulation in eukaryotic systems; and eukaryotic cell biology, cytoskeleton and signaling.
Dr. Zach N. Adelman
Associate Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
zachadel@tamu.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in my laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Dr. Gro Amdam
Professor
faculty
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe AZ USA
gro.amdam@asu.edu
Amdam Lab
Our lab experimentally investigates honey bee social structure to understand how communal living evolved from ancestral solitary forms of life. As we have come to a better understanding of the physiology and genetics of bees, we have expanded our research interests: the honey bee (Apis mellifera) makes an ideal model organism for understanding the regulation of social life-history, aging and epigenetics.