Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics, and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant, you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements, and Activities.


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Participant Contact Research Focus
David Marcey
Fletcher Jones Professor of Developmental Biology
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks California USA
Marcey Lab
The compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster consists of about 800 ommatidia in a polar arrangement around the dorsoventral (D-V) midline. Each ommatidium consists of eight photoreceptor cells arranged in a trapezoidal fashion with two mirror-symmetric forms, a dorsal form above the D-V midline, and a ventral form below. When differentiation of the ommatidia begins within the epithelium of the third instar larval eye-antennal imaginal disc, each ommatidium is a bilaterally symmetrical cluster of photoreceptor precursors polarized in the anteroposterior axis. These precursors become polarized on the D-V axis by proto-ommatidium rotation. The establishment of polarity along the D-V axis requires
Mitch McVey
Associate professor
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
The McVey lab
We use Drosophila to study DNA repair and recombination. We are particularly interested in the mechanisms by which alternative end-joining and recombinational repair of double-strand breaks results in mutagenesis and genome instability.
Keshava Mysore
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine - University of Notre Dame
South Bend Indiana USA
Duman-Scheel Lab
I am currently studying functional and developmental neurogenetics of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.
David Majerowicz
Msc., PhD.
Faculdade de Farmacia
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil

Use of insect as models for lipid metabolsim and obesity; Role of nuclear receptors and hormones in the control of lipid metabolism; Role of nuclear receptors in the Rhodnius prolixus - Trypanossoma cruzi interaction.
Farkhanda Manzoor
Lahore college for women university, Lahore
Entomology Research Lab
She is known for her research on Taxonomy, biology and integrated management (control) of urban insect pests such as termites, mosquitoes, cockroaches, ants etc. She has introduced termite baiting in Pakistan and has been working with resistance to insecticides against mosquitoes, cockroaches and flies.
John Marshall
MRC Research Fellow
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Imperial College London
London London UK

My research focuses on the use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. I have worked in a mosquito genetic engineering lab, and have developed mathematical models to describe the spread of anti-malaria genes through mosquito populations. I have also commentated on regulatory issues related to GM mosquitoes capable of spreading across international borders, and conducted the first public attitude survey on perspectives of people in Africa to GM mosquitoes for malaria control. Results from this survey suggested people would be supportive of GM mosquitoes that have been shown to work in confined field trials. This
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
Tehran Tehran Iran

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Subbarayalu Mohankumar
Plant biotechnology
Tamil Nadu agricultural university
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
Molecular ecology
Molecular ecology of crop- pest interactions, diversity of pollinators , IPM, pest genetics and genomics
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Fiona Mumoki
PhD Student
Zoology and Entomology Department, Social Insect Research Group
University of Pretoria
Hatfield, Pretoria Gauteng South Africa

I am interested in chemical communication in honeybee reproductive dominance
Dr. Rakesh Mishra
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad Telangana India
Senior Principal Scientist and Group Leader
We are interested in understanding how non-coding part of the genome, including repetitive sequences, brings about cell type specific is packaging and how once this packaging established it is maintained by epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms. We use Hox gene complexes as loci in model systems, Drosophila and zebrafish, to address theses issues address evolution of complexity in animals. By analyzing the genome organization in the context of nuclear architecture we study the structural basis of cellular memory. We propose that embryonic development is setting up of functional form of genome (epigenome or cell type specific chromatin) starting from the stem cell
Jeffrey Marcus
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Manitoba
Winnipeg MB Canada
Evolutionary developmental genetics of butterflies
My research interests focus on the evolution of developmental mechanisms. My laboratory studies the genetic and developmental basis of phenotypic variation, primarily using colour pattern formation in butterflies and moths as a model system. We employ a variety of approaches in our experiments including genomics, molecular phylogenetics, transgenics, immunohistochemistry, and computational biology.
Micky Mwamuye
Molecular Biology & Bioinformatics Unit/Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab
International Centre of insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Nairobi Kenya
Postgraduate Student
My current research focus is on the biodiversity of Ticks and tick-borne zoonoses at human-livestock-wildlife interfaces.
Stephanie Mohr
Director of the DRSC
Harvard Medical School
Boston MA USA
Drosophila RNAi Screening Center & Genome Engineering Production Group
At the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC) and more recently founded Genome Engineering Production Group (GEPG), we focus on the use of and new developments in RNA interference (RNAi), the CRISPR/Cas system, and other functional genomics approaches, including genome engineering. We are a community-focused group dedicated to transferring technologies, know-how and research materials to others for their research. We also have a growing suite of software tools and databases. Our resources are developed primarily for use with Drosophila melanogaster but many of the same approaches, underlying software, research materials, etc. can be used for non-model insects.
Arnaud Martin
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California Berkley
Evolution and Development of butterflies and moths
I am a developmental biologist who specializes in evolutionary studies of the genotype-phenotype map, in particular in non-model organisms of ecological interest. I am particularly interested in the generative mechanisms of evolutionary change and use a combination of comparative, genomic and developmental tools in lepidopterans to tackle how the genetic properties of living systems generate variation and biodiversity.
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
Madrid Madrid Spain
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Nancy Moran
Integrative Biology
University of Texas at Austin
Austin TX USA
Nancy Moran
I study biology and evolution of insects especially symbiotic relationships. Main groups of interest are aphids, leafhoppers, and bees.