Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
Anandrao Patil
CV
Department of Bioresource Science
Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India
Fukuoka Fukuoka Japan
anandbiotechniques@gmail.com
Laboratory of Insect Genome Science
Insect Molecular Biology, small non-coding RNAs
Maciej Maselko
Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St. Paul MN USA
mmaselko@umn.edu

I am developing Synthetic Incompatibility; an approach for engineering species-like barriers in sexually reproductive organisms. Synthetic Incompatibility has applications for transgene biocontainment in plants engineered to produce high-value compounds and for controlling pest species such as mosquitoes and invasive fish.
Maria Soto-Aguilar
Project Scientist
Department of Plant Pathology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
msotoaguilar@ucdavis.edu

plant-pathogen-vector interaction
chithravel vadivalagan
Molecular Entomology, Pest and Parasites Insects
CV
Zoology
Bharathiar University
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
marinedrug.9@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
My field of interest includes Molecular Ecology, Evolutionary genetics of vector born diseases and their potential vectors control by using biosynthesized Nanoparticles. I am much interested in Genomics of pest, parasites and novel haplotype variations for adaptive radiation of vector born diseases
Adriana Adolfi
Postdoc
Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
University of California Irvine
Irvine California United States
adriana.adolfi@uci.edu
James Lab
Gene drives for population replacement in the malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi
Courtney Clark-Hachtel
Doctoral Candidate
CV
Department of Biology
Miami Univerisity
Oxford OH United States
clarkcm6@miamioh.edu

Studying the evolutionary origin of the novel insect wing using various arthropods.
Kara Boltz
Postdoctoral Research Scholar
Entomology & Plant Pathology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
kaboltz@ncsu.edu

Design and evaluation of gene drives in fly pests.
Oliver Siehler
Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
oliver.siehler@gmx.de

Social and Neuroanatomical aspects of social entrainment
Jennina Taylor-Wells
Research Scientist
Research and Development
Oxitec Ltd
Abingdon Oxfordshire England, United Kingdom
jennina.taylor-wells@oxitec.com
Oxitec Ltd
My research focus encompasses the design and creation of transgenic mosquitoes for novel vector control strategies. I am interested in novel molecular biology developments for the improved design of plasmids for insect transformation, research developments in transformation efficiency and new technologies relating to insect mass rearing.
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Ewald Große-Wilde
Evolutionary Neuroethology
MPI for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thüringen Germany
ewald.grosse.wilde@gmail.com

Arthropod chemosensation.
David Dolezel
Instiute of Entomology
Biology Center
Ceske Budejovice Czech Republic Czech Republic
david.dolezel@entu.cas.cz

In our group we are mainly interested in understanding insect seasonality – diapause; architecture of photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), geographic variability of the photoperiodic timer, Juvenile hormone signaling in reproduction of insects. The classical genetic models, such as D. melanogaster, display only poor photoperiodic response. Therefore we are trying to "bring" genetic tools to insect species with robust seasonal response. Our favorite organism is the linden bug (fire bug), Pyrrhocoris apterus. In this species we are mainly in terested in: endocrinology (neuropeptides, evolution of neuropeptide receptors), reproductive behavior, circadian clock, phylogeography of P. apterus and its adaptation.
Yiyuan Li
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana United States
yli19@nd.edu

I focus on Comparative Genomics, Gene Family Evolution and Bioinformatics
Kathryn Weglarz
Biology
Utah State University
Logan UT USA
kathryn.weglarz@usu.edu

I study genome evolution in insect symbionts.
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Jianwei Li
CMAVE
USDA-ARS
Gainesville FL USA
jli06@ufl.edu

insect gene editing and genetic sexing
Ting-Hsuan Lu
PhD student
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Goettingen
GZMB, Ernst-Caspari-Haus
Goettingen - Germany
thslu16@gmail.com

Functional characterization of eye size differences between D. melanogaster and D. mauritiana.
Jaeho Lee
Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology
Seoul National University
Seoul Seoul Republic of Korea
lucanus@snu.ac.kr
Lab of Molecular Entomology and Toxicology
RNAi, pesticide, transgenesis
Kai-Shu Ling
Research Plant Pathologist
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Charleston SC USA
kai.ling@ars.usda.gov

Study virus-vector interactions, epidemiology and management of insect-transmitted viral diseases, particularly whitefly-transmitted viruses in plants.
Ibrahim Elsheshney
Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Economic Entomology
Plant Protection (Economic Entomology)
Tanta University, Egypt
Tanta Gharbeya Egypt
ishento@yahoo.com

• Investigating innovative methods of insect pest control such as CRISPR, RNAi, Bt … etc. • Studying insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry in -omics levels. • Exploring insect resistance, immunological and development. • Understanding Ecological and multi-trophic interactions (plant-pathogen-insect-symbionts-natural enemies) in the ecosystem and microbial Ecology of insects. • IPM and Biological control of Horticulture and vegetable Insect Pests • Nanotechnology applications in pest control
Silvia Lanzavecchia
Doctor in Science
CV
Genetics Institute
National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA)
HURLINGHAM BUENOS AIRES ARGENTINA
lanzavecchia.silvia@inta.gob.ar
LABORATORIO DE GENETICA DE INSECTOS DE IMPORTANCIA ECONÓMICA
Our scientific lines of research are focused on insect genetics, population genetics, application of molecular markers and the study of genes involved in physiological and behavioral processes. Our activities are associated to the development of environmentally-friendly control strategies against the most economically important insect pests and molecular characterization of beneficial insects.
Erin Scully
Research Molecular Biologist
USDA-ARS
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit
Manhattan Kansas United States
Erin.Scully@ars.usda.gov

My research focuses on the functional genomics of sensory systems of stored product insects.
Andrew Legan
PhD student
Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University
Ithaca New York United States
awl75@cornell.edu
Sheehan Lab
I am interested in major evolutionary transitions in individuality, such as the evolution of eusociality. As a graduate student, I study the primitively eusocial wasp genus Polistes, and I aim to describe the neurobiological and genomic mechanisms of chemosensation and their relevance to communication. By using a functional genetic approach in multiple paper wasp species, I hope to alter the production and perception of chemical signals in order to shed light on the function of chemical communication in social recognition, mating, and development.
Jared Koler
Biotechnology
University of Nevada Reno
Reno nv United States
jkoler@nevada.unr.edu
Gulia-Nuss
Lymphatic filariasis (LF), commonly known as elephantiasis, is a neglected tropical disease caused by parasitic filarial worms which are spread by infected mosquitoes taking blood meals required for egg maturation. More than 120 million people in ~70 countries are infected with LF. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers LF a priority in the ‘CDC winnable battles’ to eliminate LF from the Americas. Although drug therapy and mosquito control programs provide adequate control of LF, there are as yet no promising strategies on the horizon for the rise of drug and insecticide resistance in the worm
JAINDER CHHILAR
Dr
BIOLOGY
NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY
LAS CRUCES NEW MEXICO USA
jainder@gmail.com
MOSQUITO GENOMICS
My current focus is on the Anopheles mosquito immunity in context with the gut microbiome and the role of gut microbiota in priming the immune response
Samuel Arsenault
Mr.
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States of America
sva@uga.edu
Brendan G. Hunt: Evolutionary Insect Genetics Lab
My research focusses on understanding the genetic and epigenetic underpinnings of social polymorphism in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. We seek to understand which genetic and behavioral cues maintain the colony structures of these organisms in their North American range. Additionally, we implement a phylogenetics-based approach for understanding the evolution of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in Hymenoptera.
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Abhijit Ghosal
Dr.
Plant Protection
Sasya Shyamala Farm Science Centre
SOUTH 24 PARGANAS WEST BENGAL India
ghosalabhijit87@gmail.com

Agricultural Entomology Insect Biotechnology
Alexis Hill
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis MO USA
alexis.s.hill@wustl.edu

Genes and behavior
Dave Angelini
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Colby College
Waterville Maine United States
david.r.angelini@gmail.com

I am particularly interested in developmental genetic systems with alternative phenotypic outcomes, such as serially homologous, dimorphic and polyphenic traits. While my immediate research focuses on the mechanisms of these systems, my lab also uses a comparative approach to explore their evolution. Insect appendages are my most common study systems, where I use a combination of methods from functional genetics, morphometrics, endocrinology and genomics.
Rebecca Corkill
PhD student
Cell & Developmental Biology
John Innes Centre
Norwich Norfolk United Kingdom
Rebecca.Corkill@jic.ac.uk
Hogenhout Lab
I am investing transgenic methods in Bemisia tabaci, along with studying th plant-hemipteran interactions.
Gaël Le Trionnaire
Research Scientist
Plant health and protection
INRA, France
Le Rheu Brittany France
gael.le-trionnaire@inra.fr
Ecology and Genetic of Insects
Functional Genomics in Aphids. We are particularly interested on how aphids can perceive changes in day length to switch from asexual to sexual reproduction. We thus develop integrative genomics (RNA-seq, FAIRE-seq and ChIP-seq) to understand large scale genome expression changes but are also currently setting up a step-by-step protocol of targeted mutagenesis with CRISPR-Cas9 system to precisely test for the real function of candidate genes in the photoperiodic response.
Chih-Chi Lee
Research assistant
CV
Biodiversity Research Center
Academia Sinica
Taipei Taiwan Taiwan
supervolans@gmail.com

My research is focus on the adaption of invasive insects, from genomic approach to decipher what gene(s) aided the fire ants adapt to introduced environments. My another research topic is to reveal the transposon interaction with the host genome in social insects by investigating include transposon phylogenetic relationship, expression level of transposon, and transposon insertion position.
Heath Blackmon
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
coleoguy@gmail.com

I am interested in chromosome evolution, specifically, sex chromosome and chromosome number evolution. To address these topics, I use a broad range of approaches including theoretical population genetics, applied phylogenetics, and bioinformatics.
Monika Gulia-Nuss
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
RENO Nevada USA
mgulianuss@unr.edu
Vector Biology Lab
My research program investigates the fundamental questions related to vector biology and vector-parasite interactions. I am particularly interested in aspects of reproductive physiology, nutrient allocation, vector competence, and population genomics.
Anthony Clarke
Professor
School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences
Queensland University of Technology
Brisbane Queensland Australia
a.clarke@qut.edu.au

Tephritid fruit flies, especially the genera Bactrocera and Zeugodacus. The lab has interest in the systematics, taxonomy and diagnostics of these species, as well as a focus on their ecology and behaviour with a special interest in host utilisation patterns (e.g. generalism vesus specialsim) and mechanisms of host use. We use genetics and genomics equally with behaviour and ecology. We have also used genomic tools to better understand the response of male Bactrocera to plant derived secondary chemicals (= the so called fruit fly male lures).
Satyavathi Valluri
Centre of Excellence for Genetics and Genomics of Silkmoiths
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics
Hyderabad Telangana India
vsatya@cdfd.org.in
APEDA CDFD
Im involved in the project 'Development of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) resistant transgenic silkmoths and on the conduct of multilocational contained trials to establish their efficacy and generate data for their regulatory approval'.
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Mary Adewole
Miss
CV
Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology
University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo Nigeria
modupeadewole75@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
MY ACADEMIC RESEARCH FOCUS I am a young graduate female researcher with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture (Crop protection) from the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (2010). I have concluded a Master of Science Degree (2015) (Entomology) in the Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan with a Ph.D grade. Quest for more knowledge and desire to be an academia, a researcher and voice to reckon with in in the academic research world (Agriculture) have informed my stride to apply for further study to acquire Ph.D. I have been offered
pradeep bhongale
AGROCHEMICALS AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY. KOLHAPUR
KOLHAPUR MAHARASTRA INDIA
pradeepbhongale1993@gmail.com

DNA BARCODING FOR PEST IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT
Janneke Bloem
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University The Netherlands
Wageningen x Netherlands
janneke.bloem@wur.nl

Entomology
Glady Samuel
Entomology
Texas A&M
College Station TX USA
hsamuel@tamu.edu

Vector Borne diseases, Vector Viral Interactions, Mosquito Antiviral pathways
Julia Ulrich
Dpt. Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
julrich@gwdg.de

RNAi based pest control
Sonja Lindner
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
sonja.lindner@uni-goettingen.de

My aim is to study the RNAi process in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and to apply results to agricultural insect pests.
OLABISI ALAMU
Mr
CV
Plant Gemetic Resources
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology (NACGRAB)
iBADAN OYO STATE Nigeria
bisialamu@gmail.com
Seed Testing Laboratory
PhD student with the Department of Crop,Soil and Pest Management,Federal University Technology Akure( FUTA),Nigeria and a Senior Research Scientist with the NACGRAB. The current research seek to develop innovative compounds from botanicals for the control of fruit and vegetative pests of vegetables and fruit crops in Sub Sahara Africa( SSA)
Loic Revuelta
Senior Scientist (Insect Scientist)
Research & Development
Oxitec
Abingdon Oxfordshire United Kingdom
loicrl@gmail.com

I am interested in all areas of molecular entomology and insect biotechnology that could provide a basis for the research of novel insect control strategies. My current research focuses on the design and creation of transgenic Diptera for use in the field. My efforts encompass production, testing and support of all rearing aspects - including development of new rearing approaches - and also the molecular biology for the design of the genetic constructs for transformation.
Judith Wexler
CV
Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
jrwexler@ucdavis.edu

I'm interested in the evolution of insect sexual differentiation pathways. Specifically, I'm researching how a system of sex determination via alternative splicing arose in holometabolous insects by studying sex differentiation in hemimetabolous insects.
Kevin Vogel
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States
kjvogel@uga.edu
Strand Lab
My research focuses on mechanisms of mosquito development and reproduction. Specifically, I investigate mosquito reproductive endocrinology and mosquito-microbiome interactions.
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
Jacob Vinay Vikas Konakondla
Fly Facility
National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR
Bangalore Karnataka India
kjvinayvikas@outlook.com
Fly Facility In-charge
Our facility provides services to the Drosophila researchers in the areas of transgenic generation by P-element, PhiC31 mediated, MiMIC methods. Our facility also carries of developmental work towards enabling modern genome editing technologies including CRISPR/Cas9 in Drosophila.
Tofazzal Hossain Howlader
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Bangladesh Agricultural University
Mymensingh Mymensingh Bangladesh
tofazzalh@gmail.com

Bacillus thuringiensis, Entomopathogenic fungi
Richu Singla
Regional Station
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
richu@pau.edu

Insect Molecular Biology
Azza Elgendy
CV
Entomology Department
Faculty of Science, Cairo University
Giza Non-US/Non-Canadian Egypt
aelgendy@sci.cu.edu.eg

Medical entomology
Meredith Hawley
Research and Development Specialist
Pest Screening
Bayer NA - CropScience Division
Morrisville North Carolina United States of America
meredith.hawley@bayer.com
Research and Development Specialist
Investigating potential traits providing pest resistance in agricultural crops of interest
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Rebeca Carballar
CV
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
University of California Irvine
Irvine CA United States
rebecacarballar@gmail.com

My long-term research theme will be focused on the biology of mosquito metabolism and how does the epigenetic basal stage can have an impact in mosquito metabolites during pathogen infections. Mosquito metabolomics: Metabolomics is a newly emerging field of “omics” research focused in the comprehensive characterization of small molecules (metabolites). Metabolomics is an important tool that can complement the existing data (transcriptomics, genomics and proteomics) in mosquito research. I pioneer the use of mass spectrometry analytical methods to profile a metabolite signature in vector mosquitoes and I have established a pipeline for metabolomics analyses, including sample collection, metabolite extractions, and data
Tonya Colpitts
Assistant Professor
CV
Pathology Microbiology & Immunology
University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Columbia SC USA
tonya.colpitts@uscmed.sc.edu
COLPITTS LAB
Our laboratory researches the interactions between arboviruses and mosquito vectors, with a focus on dengue virus and the Aedes midgut. We are also examining the impact of human serum components on mosquito immunity and virus infection and developing transmission blocking vaccines against arboviruses.
Phanidhar Kukutla
Postdoctoral research associate
Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care
Mass General Hospital
Charlestown Massachusetts  USA
pkukutla@mgh.harvard.edu

I am interested in pursuing research that addresses questions related to biology/physiology of disease vectors, host-microbe-pathogen interactions, molecular genetics of host-associated bacteria, and engineering microbes for pharmaceutical/biotech applications.
Elisabeth Marchal
Biology - research group of Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
KU Leuven
Leuven Vl-Brabant Belgium
elisabeth.marchal@bio.kuleuven.be

Regulation of lipophilic hormone biosynthesis, ecdysteroids, juvenile hormones. Signal transduction of JH, 20E, cross-talk and interaction with insulin like peptides. Neuropeptides and their GPCRs.
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Erica Lindroth
Testing and Evaluation
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
Jacksonville Florida USA
erica.j.lindroth.mil@mail.mil

My research focuses on the development and evaluation of vector control technology for military use.
Girish Neelakanta
Assistant Professor (tenure-track)
Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk VA USA
gneelaka@odu.edu
Neelakanta Lab
My laboratory studies host-microbe interactions at the molecular level. Current focus is to understand interactions of vector-borne pathogens with their arthropod vectors (both hard and soft ticks) and their mammalian hosts. In addition, we study several aspects of vector biology in terms of understanding arthropod feeding, behavior to environment stimuli and symbiosis with microbes. We use combination of genetics, molecular biology, genomics, immunology, cell biology and microbiology approaches to decipher important aspects of these interactions.
Murat Güler
P.hD. Student
Biology/Zoology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Campus Türkiye
muratgmbg@gmail.com
Cumsag
I earned my BSc degree from Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG) at the Cumhuriyet University. My research interests were shaped during this time. The MBG program have provided me with general theory and practice in the area of molecular biology. But my interest specially is focused on bioinformatics and evolutionary biology. At the same time I have started to work with Dr. Hasan H. BAŞIBÜYÜK, who is the head of the Molecular Systematic Research Group of Cumhuriyet University (for more info. cumsag.com). The research group works mainly on taxonomy, phylogeny, population genetics and mitogenome of sawflies (Symphyta: Hymenoptera).
Katrina Klett
Agronomy
Vietnam National University of Agriculture
Hanoi  Hanoi Vietnam
katrina.klett@gmail.com
Tropical Bee and Beekeeping Research Institute
I am interested in honey bee breeding as a means of selecting for genetic resistance to pathogens and producing robust and healthy bees.
Leela Alamalakala
Research Scientist
Biotechnology R&D
Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Co. Ltd.
Jalna Maharashtra India
leela.alamalakala@gmail.com
Molecular Entomology Lab
Plant-Insect Interactions, Plant defense responses to phloem-feeding insects, Functional genomics
Deanna Arsala
PhD Student
CV
Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago IL United States
darsal2@uic.edu
Lynch Lab
My main research focus is understanding how the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT) functions in haplodiploid embryos using Nasonia as a model organism. Using RNA-seq and a functional approach (eRNAi, pRNAi), I aim to uncover regulators of the MZT. I am also researching how sex identity is established in Nasonia during the MZT and how major zygotic gene activation in the early embryo is influenced by gene body methylation using epigenomic profiling and transcriptomic approaches (RNAi-RNA-seq, ATAC-seq, WGBSeq).
Anna Gilles
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhône-Alpes France
anna.f.gilles@gmail.com

I am working on posterior development in the insect model Tribolium castaneum. In contrast to Drosophila, the abdominal segments of Tribolium develop from a posterior growth zone during embryogenesis in a process similar to vertebrate somitogenesis. My project aims to understand the cellular basis of this by characterizing cell behavior both by in vivo imaging experiments and by clonal analysis. While the posterior growth zone of short germ insects has been described as a proliferative tissue in the classical literature, recent studies and my own data point to cell rearrangement as the main cause of posterior elongation. I am currently
Richard Meisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Biochemistry
University of Houston
Houston TX United States
rpmeisel@uh.edu

Evolutionary genomics of sex chromosomes, sex determination, and sexual dimorphism in flies.
Maria-Dolors Piulachs
Research Scientist at CSIC
Functional Genomics and Evolution
Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
Barcelona APO/FPO EUROPE / ATLANTIC Spain
mdolors.piulachs@ibe.upf-csic.es
Insect reproduction Lab.
Our long term objective is to elucidate how the oogenesis in insects is regulated, considering the structural diversity of ovary types and their respective evolutionary history.
Neha Kulkarni
Bioinformatics
Department of Bioinformatics, Savitribai Phule Pune University (University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
5591.neha@gmail.com

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Cory Gall
Ph.D. candidate
CV
Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology
Washington State University
Pullman WA USA
gall.cory@gmail.com
Brayton lab
My research focus includes characterizing the bacterial microbiome of the Rocky Mountain wood tick, manipulating the microbiome in order to look at the role endosymbionts have in pathogen acquisition, as well as trying to correlate the changes in the microbiome over field generations with the tick’s variation in pathogen susceptibility.
Jennifer Baltzegar
NSF IGERT Fellow in Genetic Engineering and Society
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
jen_baltzegar@ncsu.edu
Gould Lab
I am broadly interested in studying the differences between populations and species via mechanisms of evolution and impacts of population change. I am particularly interested in studying the impacts genetic engineering technologies have on natural populations.
Anna Katrina Briley
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence/ University of Florida
Jacksonville Florida US
annakatrinabriley@gmail.com

Testing and Evaluation of novel pesticide products and equipment for military use.
Fernando Consoli
PhD
Dept of Entomology and Acarology
University of Sao Paulo/ESALQ
Piracicaba Sao Paulo Brazil
fconsoli@usp.br
Insect Interactions Lab
Our lab is dedicated to understand the diversity and role of symbionts in insect bioecology, and to investigate the potential of symbionts for biotechnological exploitation. We also use functional transcriptomic and genomic analyses to investigate insect-insect and insect-symbionts interactions and to develop strategies for pest control (RNAi).
Alexandros Belavilas-Trovas
Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
alexbelavilas@hotmail.com
Molecular biology & genomics-Mathiopoulos lab
The analysis of genes involved in the sexual behaviour of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. Our purpose is the use of these data for the improvement of the SIT approaches or other innovative pest control strategies
Ewan CAMPBELL
Dr
School of Biological Sciences
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen Aberdeen City United Kingdom
e.m.campbell@abdn.ac.uk
Bowman Lab
I am interested in applying RNAi and gene silencing techniques to the field of agricultural and livestock pests with a focus on the major parasite of Honey bees, the Varroa mite. I have developed RNAi targets and delivery mechanisms in a range of species including Sea Lice, Ticks and mites. I am also interested in utilising RNAi and gene manipulation for the study of physiological pathways in ectoparasites, such as in host sensing, reproductive cues and blood feeding.
Waring Trible
Genetics
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
wtrible@rockefeller.edu
Kronauer Laboratory
Ant genetics. I am currently working on developing a CRISPR protocol in the ant Cerapachys biroi, which I will use to study genes relevant to caste differentiation and chemical communication. Past projects include population genetics of fire ants and army ants, fire ant phermone analysis, and phylogenetics of ant evolution.
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Paula Irles
Assistant Professor
Institute of Agronomic Science
Universidad de O'Higgins
Rancagua Libertador Bernardo O'Higgins Chile
pirles@uc.cl

My research focused on the molecular mechanisms under insect oogenesis, specifically which and how signaling pathways are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death during ovary maturation. I am currently work on the role of Hippo signaling pathway during ovarian and embryo development in earwigs.
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Aine O’Sullivan
Department of Entomology
Penn State University
University Park PA USA
aiosullivan29@gmail.com
Grozinger Lab
My research is focused on how bumble bee health can be improved by implementation of different genetic technologies to mitigate the effects of abiotic and biotic stressors.
Alys Jarvela
Postdoctoral Researcher
CV
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
veniecealys@gmail.com
Pick Lab
Building and comparing developmental gene regulatory networks among insects
Angela Meccariello
Ph.D. student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Naples 'Federico II'
Naples Italy Italy
angela.meccariello@unina.it
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Genetics and transcriptomics of sex determination in pest insects: Aedes albopictus Ceratitis capitata Phlebotomus perniciosus
Sumeyra Sanal
PhD student
Molecular Entomology
Anadolu University
Eskisehir Tepebası Turkey
sumeyrasanal@gmail.com

Genetic and phylogeographical settlement of Tabanidae genus in the Turkey Fauna
sekhar srikakolapu
Mr.
CV
laboratory of molecular genetics
Center for DNA fingerprinting and Diagnostics
hyderabad Andhra Pradesh india
sekharsri5@gmail.com
Laboratory Of molecular genetics
Elucidation of alternative Splicing mechanism and genome editing through CRISPR Cas9 in Bombyx mori
RANIA ABD EL-WAHAB
Assistant Professor
CV
Mites of Cotton and Field Crops
PLANT PROTECTION RESEARCH INSTITUTE
MANSOURA MANSOURA EGYPT
rania-proline@hotmail.com

NANOTECHNOLOGY,LIGHT EMITTING DIODES EFFECTS,PREDATION ON MITES
kailash lipne
Research and development
Mahyco Research centre, Jalna
Jalna Maharashtra INDIA
kailash.lipne@gmail.com
Research associate
RNAi technology, Insecticidal gene discovery.
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Andrea Gloria-Soria
Associate Research Scientist
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
andrea.gloria-soria@yale.edu
Powell Lab & Turner Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested on the behavioral genetics of feeding behavior in mosquitoes and its consequences for dengue transmission. I also conduct population genetic studies on Aedes aegypti mosquitos to understand historical and recent invasions.
Muhammad Akmal
Insect genetic diversity and infection with endosymbionts
CV
Entomology
Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan
Multan Punjab Pakistan
akmal07bzu@gmail.com
lab. of Insect Microbiology and Molecular Biology,
I am working on genetics of Amrasca devastans and its infection with wolbachia.
Akhtar Rasool
Assistant Professor
Centre for Animal Sciences and Fisheries
University of Swat
Mingora, Swat Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan
akhtarrasool@hotmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology Lab
I am interested in insect molecular biology mainly, insect evolved resistance mechanisms against chemical and biological insecticides. My research focuses is lepidopteran pests, one of the diverse pest insect order and which have threaten agriculture because they have evolved resistance to a wide range of pesticides.
Binshuang Li
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY USA
binshuang.li@rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
Identifying the locus controlling wing polymorphism in male pea aphids.
Jason Hill
Zoologi
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
jason.hill@zoologi.su.se

Lepidopteran evolutionary genomics. Specifically butterfly adaptation in the wild.
Soren Nylin
Professor
Zoology
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
soren.nylin@zoologi.su.se

Seasonal adaptations, life history, life cycle regulation in butterflies. Insect-plant relationships.
Margaret Allen
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Pests Research Unit
US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service
Stoneville MS USA
megallenathome@gmail.com
Functional Genetics
Functional genetics of a variety of insects that are non-model organisms.
Zain UlAbdin
Dr./Assistant Professor
Entomology
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
zainunibas@gmail.com
"Insect Molecular Biology Lab."
Insect parasitoids have evolved an amazing array of mechanisms to manipulate host physiology and biochemistry and they are able to suppress the immune response of the host and to disrupt its development and reproduction. The virulence and host regulation factors triggering these alterations are injected by the ovipositing females in their hosts. The astonishing richness of species in the parasitic Hymenoptera pro¬vides a unique reservoir of molecular biodiversity for new bio¬insecticide molecules, targeting a number of insect species and developmental stages. Host-parasitoid associations in insects offer an impressive opportunity to identify new genes and molecules responsible for the major
Dave Denlinger
CV
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
david.denlinger@aggiemail.usu.edu
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Karl Joplin
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
East Tennessee State University
Johnson City Tennessee USA
joplin@etsu.edu
Karl Joplin
Physiology and molecular biology of diapause, Insect behavior and circadian rhythms, Stress response of insects
Samuel Helrich
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
samuel.helrich@tufts.edu

Bioactuation
feng liu
PhD student
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology
Auburn University
Auburn AL USA
fzl0009@auburn.edu
Insect Toxicology and Physiology
insect olfaction, electrophysiology and chemical ecology
Rajendra Chilukuri
Research Assoiciate,
Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Centre for DNA fingreprinting and Diagnostics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Daignostics, CDFD
Hyderabad Telangana India
cverajendra@gmail.com
LMG ,Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Sex Determination and Immunology
Trevor Wardill
BBSRC David Phillips Fellow
Physiology, Development and Neuroscience Department
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
tjw79@cam.ac.uk

I study how visual information in various species of flies is integrated in the brain, looking particularly how colour and motion signals are combined and used in behaviours such as finding mates and food. This research aims to discover some of the principles of how neurons decide which information is important and which to discard, and which has the greatest priority. In the coming year I will hire a postdoc to help my plans to make genetic tools that will make non-model species more accessible to transgenic alteration.
Claire Donald
Miss
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
University of Glasgow
Glasgow GLASGOW Scotland, UK
1103886d@student.gla.ac.uk
Kohl Lab
The Kohl group works on RNA interference, immune signalling pathways and virus/host interactions in arthropod vectors by using arboviruses or virus-derived replicons from all major families. The aim of my work is to further understand the interaction of arboviruses with the RNAi responses of their mosquito vector.
Eveline Verhulst
PhD
CV
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Wageningen The Netherlands
e.c.verhulst@gmail.com

My main research focuses on the evolution of sex determining mechanisms in insects. From 2014 onwards, I am funded by a NWO Veni grant to determine how this one conserved gene, called doublesex, can regulate the diverse sexual morphologies found in insects. This research is hosted at the Wageningen University (WUR) in the Laboratory of Genetics group. The main ambition of my research is to compare the sex determining pathways of three parasitic wasp species: Nasonia vitripennis, Muscidifurax raptorellus and M. uniraptor.
Gary Blissard
Professor
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
gwb1@cornell.edu
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
Arnubio Valencia
Plant Sciences
Universidad de Caldas
Manizales Caldas Colombia
arnubio.valencia@ucaldas.edu.co

Research activities are focused on the study of transcripts (RNAm) from the intestinal tract of insect pests, in order to find some target insect genes that could be silenced using RNAi technology. In addition, I am also interested in cloning and expression of insect genes involved with the digestion of cellulose with potential to be used in future programs related with bioenergy production and Insect transcriptome analysis.
Valeria Petrella
PhD
CV
biology
University of Naples "Federico II"
Napoli Italy Italy
valeria.petrella@unina.it
Insects Molecular Genetics
I'm a postdoctoral researcher with a broad interest in Molecular Genetics. My main research focuses on the study of sex determining mechanisms in insects and biotech approaches to control pest insects, with particular interest on diptera (Ceratitis capitata, aedes aegypti, aedes albopictus, phlebotomus perniciosus). In 2014 I've joined the Giuseppe Saccone and Marco Salvemini group as a Post. Doc with a one-year fellowship entitled "Comparative Population Transcriptomics To Uncover Sex Determination of Aedes albopictus and Phlebotomus perniciosus, Two Emerging Haematophagous Insect Species". Then main goal of my project is the molecular charachterization and functional analysis of genes
philip Ndaloma
Lecturer
CV
Plant and Soil Sciences
Cuttington University
Monrovia Gbarnga  Liberia
firstnamephilipndaloma@yahoo.com

Climate change impact on the re-occurrence of army worm
zhiqiang Lu
Professor
Entomology
Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University
Yangling Shaanxi China
zhiqiang.lu@nwsuaf.edu.cn

1. Using silkworm as a model insect, we investigate the roles of reactive oxygen species in insect immune systems. 2. We are also interested in how pea aphids deal with pathogenic bacteria and fungi. 3. Proteomics analysis of parasitic wasp venom.
Wang Liuhao
School of Resource and Environment Science
Henan Institute of Science and Technology
Xinxiang Henan China
liuhaowang2007@163.com

Heat shock transcription factor of Bemisia tabaci
Patricia Jumbo Lucioni
Postdoctoral research scholar
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN USA
patricia.jumbo@vanderbilt.edu
Postdoctoral Research Scholar-Broadie Lab
My current research field addresses the unknown mechanisms behind inborn errors of metabolism, classic galactosemia and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Patients with these disorders grow to develop neurodevelopmental complications of unknown mechanism which lack appropriate treatment. I use fruit flies as genetic models to characterize these phenotypes and elucidate disease mechanisms underlying these chronic inborn deficits.
John Marshall
MRC Research Fellow
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Imperial College London
London London UK
john.marshall@imperial.ac.uk

My research focuses on the use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. I have worked in a mosquito genetic engineering lab, and have developed mathematical models to describe the spread of anti-malaria genes through mosquito populations. I have also commentated on regulatory issues related to GM mosquitoes capable of spreading across international borders, and conducted the first public attitude survey on perspectives of people in Africa to GM mosquitoes for malaria control. Results from this survey suggested people would be supportive of GM mosquitoes that have been shown to work in confined field trials. This
Kimberly Paczolt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
kpaczolt@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
I am studying the evolution of the meiotic drive X chromosome in stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni) from both a genetic and organismal perspective. First, I am working to identify genes involved in the meiotic drive pathway, which has arisen independently from other well known drive systems. Second, I am interested in understanding how the meiotic drive X chromosome affects the evolution of morphology and behavior in populations and species of stalk-eyed flies.
Ming Li
Ph.D Student
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Auburn University
Auburn Alabama United states
mzl0025@auburn.edu

Molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance development
Komal kumar Bollepogu Raja
student
Biochemistry and Molecular biology
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
kbollepo@mtu.edu

Studying complex color patterns in new model organisms
Kuang-HUi LU
Professor
Department of Entomology
National Chung Hsing University
Taichung Taiwan Taiwan
khlu@nchu.edu.tw
Insect Physiology and Biochemistry Laboratory
Insect Physiology, Insect Endocrinology, Insect Transgenesis
Simon Collier
PhD
Department of Genetics
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
psc38@cam.ac.uk
Fly Facility
Drosophila genome modification Planar Cell Polarity
Junbo Luan
Entomology
Cornell university
Ithaca NY USA
jbluan@hotmail.com

Whitefly genetics, and molecular mechanisms of whitefly interactions with other organisms
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Isidoro Feliciello
Dr.
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery
University of Naples Federico II
Napoli NA Italy
ifelicie@unina.it
Laboratory of Experimental Biology
Satellite DNAs of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum: roles in genome dynamic and gene expression.
Mark Blaxter
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Scotland UK
mark.blaxter@ed.ac.uk
Nematode and neglected genomics
The Blaxter nematode and neglected genomics lab uses genomics approaches, based on next-gen sequencing, to assemble, annotate and interpret the genomes of target species. While our main focus is on parasitic members of the Nematoda (we are involved in projects to understand the evolutionary genomic origins of parasitism, and collaborate with a wide range of biologists developing new drugs and vaccines for human and animal diseases), we also study free-living nematodes, nematomorphs, tardigrades, onychophorans, obscure and not so obscure arthropods... and some token lophotrochozoans, such as snails and earthworms. A second research focus in on bacterial symbionts of animals, particularly
John Masly
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
University of Oklahoma
Norman OK U.S.A.
masly@ou.edu

The primary goal of the research performed in my lab is to understand the mechanisms that generate biodiversity. We use molecular and genomic technologies to study how genetic change directs the development of differences between species and ultimately gives rise to two important evolutionary processes— speciation and phenotypic evolution. We study four closely related species of fruit flies that belong to the Drosophila melanogaster species complex, which allows us to take advantage of the arsenal of genetic, genomic, and molecular tools available in D. melanogaster. More recently, we have begun to develop North American damselflies in the genus Enallagma as
carole long
Chief, Malaria Immunology Section
Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/NIH
Rockville MD USA
clong@niaid.nih.gov
Malaria Immunology Section
Immunity to malaria parasites including sexuals stages Vaccine development Field studies in Mali Studies of sexual stages of malaria parasites in culture and in the mosquito Mosquito membrane feeding assays and blocking of transmission with drugs or vaccines
Hongmei Li-Byarlay
NRC Research Fellow
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
hlibyar@ncsu.edu

I'm working on insect genomics, stress, and social behavior. My research interests include how genetic or epigenetic marks regulate gene activities in natural conditions as well as different stress conditions, or how they affects social behaviors of insects.
John Belote
Professor
Biology Department
Syracuse University
Syracuse NY USA
jbelote@syr.edu
Belote Lab
In collaboration with the Scott Pitnick lab (Syracuse University) we are studying mechanisms of post-mating sexual selection in a variety of insects, including Drosophila, Tribolium, sepsids and yellow dung flies.
Mark Guillotte
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
University of Maryland Baltimore
Baltimore Maryland United States
mguil33@gmail.com

Vector-borne disease
Susan Villarreal
Postdoctoral Associate
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
smv32@cornell.edu
Laura Harrington Lab
Exploring the genetic components to insect mating behavior
Vandana Hivrale
Dr. Vandana Hivrale
CV
Department of Biochemistry and molecular biology
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Ok, USA
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
vandanahivrale@hotmail.com
Biochemistry and molecular biology
At my institute (Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad), we are attempting to screen of non-host Protease inhibitor /Amylase inhibitor proteins for developing Helicoverpa armigera tolerance in important crop plants like pigeonpea, cotton and tomato. In India, H. armigera is responsible for preharvest losses of pigeonpea, chickpea, cotton, tomato, okra etc and storage pests such as callosobruchus and tribolium spp for post harvest damage. One of the sustainable solutions to this problem is development of insect-resistant transgenic plants using two transgenes (PI/AI), however, effect of such transgene expression in these plants has yet to be investigated.
TRANG LE THI DIEU
Dr.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
ltdtrang@hcmuaf.edu.vn
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Tom Walsh
Research Scientist
Land and Water
CSIRO
Canberra ACT Australia
tom.walsh@csiro.au

I'm particularly interested in resistance to pesticides and using genomic and molecular techniques to investigate the evolutionary history and functional biology of these traits.
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
Guy Bloch
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem - None - Israel
guy.bloch@mail.huji.ac.il
Molecular Sociobiolgy
The main research interests of our group are the evolution and mechanisms underlying sociality and social behavior, we study bees as a model. To study these fascinating and intricate phenomena we integrate analyses at different levels, from molecular to social. In recent years, one of our main research focuses has been the interplay between circadian rhythms and social behavior ("sociochronobiology").
yosra khalfallah
PhD student
Biology
university of Tunis el manar
Djerba Medenine Tunisia
yosra_khalfallah0607@yahoo.fr
génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures à intéret agronomique
microRNAs implicate in plant pathogen interactions
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
Heiko Vogel
Dr.
Department of Entomology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thuringia Germany
hvogel@ice.mpg.de
Research Group Leader
Insect Genomics; Innate Immunity; Molecular Evolution; Plant-Insect Interactions; Detoxification; Insect adaptation to extreme ecological niches.
Elizabeth Walker
Lab Manager/Research Tech Sr.
EEB
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan United States
walkeliz@umich.edu
Wittkopp Lab
I am broadly interested in evolutionary development and how that plays a role in the diversity of organisms, including gene regulation
Marla Sokolowski
University Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto
Toronto Ontario Canada
marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca
Sokolowski Lab: Genes, Environment and Behaviour
We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences (gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect behavior. Experiential affects, like developmental ones can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but
Philipp Lehmann
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyväskylä
Jyväskylä Central Finland Finland
philipp.lehmann@jyu.fi

My research area covers both behavioral and physiological aspects of survival in and expansion to environments with large seasonal fluctuations. I primarily study energetic and immunity related stress responses during insect diapause in high latitude environments.
Mark Rheault
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of British Columbia
Kelowna British Columbia Canada
mark.rheault@ubc.ca
Rheault Lab
Our lab strives to understand how transporting epithelia of insects such as the, salivary glands, midgut, Malpighian tubules, hindgut and anal papillae of various insects play a role in the ionoregulation, osmoregulation, and the excretion of potentially toxic endogeneous or exogenous compounds. In order to elucidate mechanisms responsible for these phenomena our lab uses an integrative approach which includes gene level to to whole organism studies.
Subhash Lakhotia
Professor
Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology
Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi UP India
lakhotia@bhu.ac.in

Major current research interests using Drosophila as the model organism: cell stress related gene expression in development, long non-coding RNAs, stress proteins in tumour development, neurodegenerative disorders, Ayurvedic Biology
Simon Bullock
Dr
Cell Biology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
sbullock@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk
Mechanisms of cytoplasmic mRNA transport
Our group is interested in how mRNAs and other cargoes are sorted within the cytoplasm by microtubule-based motors. We exploit the genetics of Drosophila melanogaster for part of our work, and have optimised CRISPR/Cas tools for this organism (www.crisprflydesign.org).
Gareth Lycett
Vector
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside UK
gareth.lycett@lstmed.ac.uk
Lycett Group
I am a vector molecular biologist whose main interests are focused on functional genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae. The topics explored include cellular and molecular analysis of mosquito/plasmodium interactions, developing tools for conditional expression in transgenic Anophelines, regulation of gene expression in mosquito tissues, and functional genetic analysis of insecticide resistance.
Dr. Md Saheb Ali
Senior Researcher (Senior Scientific Officer)
CV
Agriculture Wing/Faculty
Bangladesh Jute Research Institute
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan and Utsunomiya University, Japan
Utsunomiya & TUAT, TOKYO JAPAN
sahebbjri@yahoo.com
Lab of Insect Molecular Biology/ Lab of Insect Biotechnology
My research interest focused to clarify the regulatory mechanism of cuticular protein gene expression of insect using reverse-transcriptase PCR, real-time PCR, cloning, plasmid construction, histology, site-directed mutagenesis, gene-gun and reporter construct preparation, transient expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay.
Mauro Mandrioli
PhD
Life Sciences
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Modena Italy Italy
mauro.mandrioli@unimo.it
Insect genetics and Biosciences Lab
Insect cytogenetics and microbiome analysis
Carlos Gustavo Nunes Silva
Professor
Department of Genetics
Universidade Federal do Amazonas
Manaus Amazonas Brazil
cgmanaus@gmail.com
Lab. DNA technologies
"Beeotechnology"
Maria Cristina Silva
PhD.
CV
Biotechniology
Embrapa Genetic Resource and Biotechnology
Brasilia DF BRAZIL
cristina.mattar@embrapa.br
Plant Pest Molecular Interaction
Specialist in plant molecular biology, works in the area of plant biotechnology aimed at resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Undertakes research focusing on the following themes: Evolution of molecules in vitro selection of variants with improved activity, molecular interaction studies aiming to plant pest resistance to insects.
Ludvik Gomulski
Department of Biology and Biotechnology
University of Pavia
Pavia PV Italy
gomulski@unipv.it
Genetics and genomics of insects of economic and medical importance
We are using transcriptome data to analyze the molecular changes that accompany major physiological and behavioral changes such as maturation and mating in different insect species of medical and agricultural importance. We are particularly interested in transcriptional changes in olfactory related genes.
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Thomas Flatt
SNF Professor
CV
Department of Ecology and Evolution
University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Lausanne Vaud Switzerland
thomas.flatt@unil.ch
Evolution and Mechanisms of Life History
I study the evolution and mechanisms of life history and aging, mostly by applying population and functional genomics approaches (next-generation sequencing, population genomics) to natural (e.g., clinal) and laboratory (e.g., artificial selection and experimental evolution) populations of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) which are phenotypically differentiated for life history. I am particulary interested in using genomic approaches to identify candidate genes and alleles likely shaped by selection and then to test these candidates for effects upon life history by using functional genetics (e.g., RNAi, synthetic recombinant populations, and gene editing methods such as CRISPR/Cas-9). Currently, we are applying this toolbox
Thierry Brévault
Dr
Entomology
CIRAD
Dakar Dakar Senegal
brevault@cirad.fr

Entomology and Ecology
Omogo Collins
Mr.
CV
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
International Centre For Insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Kenya Kenya
graomogo@yahoo.com
Icipe-Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Unit
My career goal is to be an investigator in tropical medicine, focusing in research on the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), and emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), with focus on the identification and validation of novel drug targets for chemotherapeutic control.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Ada Rafaeli
Associate Director , Prof.
Academic Affairs and International Cooperation
Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center
Bet Dagan NONE ISRAEL
vtada@volcani.agri.gov.il
Insect Physiology Lab, Department of food quality and safety
Physiological, biochemical and molecular regulatory mechanisms of insect reproductive behavior, particularly in lepidopterans
Karen Barandoc-Alviar
Research Associate
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kbalviar@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research focuses on virus-vector interaction and we use the emerging model system, Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper and Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV). Our goal is to identify vector molecules that respond to virus infection and how changes in vector physiology and behavior affect efficiency of transmission to host plants.
Paul Linser
Professor of Cell Biology
Whitney Laboratory
University of Florida
Saint Augustine Florida USA
pjl@whitney.ufl.edu
Linser Lab
Cell biology of a number of organismal systems. In regard to mosquitoes, my group has focused on epithelial physiology and cell biology as it impacts alimentary canal function. Tools we use include transcriptomics, electrophysiology, advanced imaging (light microscopy), general molecular biology.
Emilie Pondeville
Dr
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
Glasgow Glasgow Scotland, UK
emilie.pondeville@glasgow.ac.uk

Reproduction and immunity in mosquito vectors using genetic tools
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Vett Lloyd
Professor
Biology
Mt. Allison University
Sackville New Brunswick Canada
vlloyd@mta.ca
Lloyd Lab - Mt. Allison
Drosophila: Epigenetics, transgenerational effects, Wolbachia Ticks: Genome structure, population structure, Borrelia, bartonella
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Shirley Luckhart
Professor
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
UC Davis
Davis CA United States
sluckhart@ucdavis.edu

General areas of research in the laboratory include: the molecular cell biology and biochemistry of malaria parasite transmission, the functional characterization of the immunological crosstalk and cell signaling that occurs between the mosquito and the mammalian host during bloodfeeding, and the impact of endemic co-infections on malaria parasite development and transmission. Specific research projects include: the conserved signal transduction pathways involved in anti-parasite host innate immunity; systems biology and function of immune factors and cell signaling pathways that are activated between mosquitoes and their mammalian hosts at the interface of bloodfeeding; identification and functional analyses of naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms
Julie Reynolds
Postdoctoral Researcher
Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
reynolds.473@osu.edu
Postdoctoral Researcher
Molecular, Biochemical, and Physiological aspects of diapause.
ahmad jamal
Department of zoology
university of Peshawar
peshawar KPK pakistan
ahmadjamalafridi@gmail.com

Spider Teaxonomy
Paul Eggleston
Prof.
Life Sciences
Keele University
Keele Staffs. UK
p.eggleston@keele.ac.uk
Molecular Entomology
My research interests are in molecular entomology, particularly the molecular genetics of mosquitoes that transmit human disease and their complex interactions with the parasites and viruses that cause disease. Because of their medical importance, the focus of my group is on the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Current projects include the development of technologies for genetic engineering of mosquitoes, the creation of genetically modified mosquitoes that are compromised in their ability to transmit disease and the development of strategies for stage- and tissue-specific gene expression within genetically modified mosquitoes. My research has attracted
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Christina Schulte
CV
Heinrich-Heine University
Evolutionary Genetics
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
christina-schulte@gmx.de

Honeybee workers show altruistic behaviors in contrast to queens and drones, which show behaviors that are related to reproduction. The collective behaviors of the worker bees produce group phenotypes that allow them to remain well-adapted in a changing environment. These worker specific behaviors have been largely described but we have little understanding of the molecular control that specifies these behaviors in the brain during development, and of its evolution that gave rise to social behaviors during the last 60 million years. Differentiation of the worker brain is specified by female- and caste-determining signals. The sex-determining signal is implemented by Feminizer protein
Yoosook Lee
Pathology, Immunology and Microbiology
University of California - Davis
Davis CA United States
yoslee@ucdavis.edu
Vector Genetics Laboratory
Population genomics of malaria vectors. Population genetics of mosquitoes
Gregory Lanzaro
Professor
Vector Genetics Laboratory, Dept. Pathology, Microbiology & Immunology
University of California-Davis
Davis California United States
gclanzaro@ucdavis.edu
Vector Genetics Lab
My research background is in insect population genetics with a focus on insect vectors of human disease. Recently I have been moving from classical population genetics to population genomics and bioinformatics. Our current emphasis has largely shifted from using genetic markers, such as microsatellite DNA and SNPs, to next generation sequencing, allowing us to analyze the genetics of populations by studying diversity at the individual mosquito whole genome level. Our work can be considered on two levels: (i) as contributing to an improved understanding of disease transmission and control and (ii) basic evolutionary genetics addressing issues involving the evolution of
Adam Dolezal
Postdoctoral Researcher
Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
adolezal@gmail.com

I am interested in the interaction of various stressors, particularly nutrition and pathogens, on honey bee health, as well as how these factors affect other pollinator species.
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
cmerlin@bio.tamu.edu
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Alexandra Wilson
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
acwilson@bio.miami.edu
Wilson Group
The Wilson Group's research focuses on the symbiosis of sap-feeding insects with their obligate intracellular bacterial symbionts. Working within an evolutionary framework they use protein expression systems and immunolocalization to functionally characterize amino acid transporters at the symbiotic interface of sap-feeding insects.
Brian Lovett
Graduate Student
Entomology Department
University of Maryland
College Park MD United States
lovettbr@umd.edu
St. Leger Lab
Brian Lovett is a PhD student studying mycology and genetics in agricultural and vector biology systems. He is currently working on projects analyzing mycorrhizal interactions in agricultural systems and the transcriptomics of malaria vector mosquitoes.
Utpal Pal
Associate Professor
Veterinary Medicine
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park MD USA
upal@umd.edu

Our research interest focuses on better understanding the host-pathogen interaction involving the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia burgdorferi, and the arthropod vector, Ixodes scapularis ticks. Our goals are to identify novel virulence determinants of B. burgdorferi as well as vector gene-products that play critical roles for successful persistence of the pathogen in the tick-rodent infectious cycle, and use this information to interfere with the infection.
Ting Li
Research Associate
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Auburn University
Auburn AL USA
tzl0001@auburn.edu

Different mechanisms of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes.
Claude Desplan
Professor
CV
Biology
NYU
New York New York United States
cd38@nyu.edu
Molecular Genetics
EVO-DEVO: Evolution of axis formation using the wasp Nasonia. Different strategies are used in insects to establish embryonic polarity. In the ancestral short-germ mode of development, nuclei fated to become the embryo are restricted to the posterior end of the egg while the anterior of the egg develops as extra-embryonic membranes. Only anterior segments are patterned at the syncytial blastoderm while abdominal segments form in a posterior growth zone. This system relies on a single posterior morphogenetic center whereby a localized posterior determinant (nanos) is responsible for forming gradients of factors that pattern head and thorax. In the derived long-germ
Beatrice Clack
Associate Professor
Biology and Biotechnology
Stephen F. Austin State University
Nacogdoches Texas United States
bclack@sfasu.edu

Studying the genomics of Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Sunn pest) and the Prolyl Endo Protease the bug secretes in its saliva that destroys wheat gluten.
Jennifer Gleason
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS USA
jgleason@ku.edu

My lab focuses on the genetics of behavior, primarily in Drosophila. We are interested in the genetic changes resulting in behavioral isolation between species. To that end, we study courtship behaviors, primarily acoustic signals (courtship song) and pheromones.
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón
VectorBase Scientific Liaison/Outreach Manager
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
ggiraldo@nd.edu
VectorBase
I teach scientist at all career stages, students, postdocs, technicians, researchers, and faculty, how to use VectorBase data, tools and resources. I also teach how to manually annotate genes to submit them in VectorBase, we currently use Artemis but will soon host WebApollo too. Our developers are currently working on VectorBase Galaxy, soon will be teaching how to use it too.
Mr. JJ Hanly
Graduate Student
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambirdge Cambridge United Kingdom
jjh55@cam.ac.uk
Butterfly Genetics Group
I am interested the role of regulatory mutations in evolution of morphology. I investigate this using the red pattern elements of the wings of Heliconius butterflies.
Michel Slotman
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
maslotman@tamu.edu

My work focuses on understanding adaptation and speciation in disease transmitting mosquitoes. My lab studies the olfactory systems of An. gambiae and Ae. aegypti to identify the genetic factors responsible for the adaptation of these species to human hosts. We are also interested in the impact of vector control on mosquito populations; specifically how IRS and LLINs reduce mosquito effective population size and cause shifts in behavior. Finally, we are interested in the speciation process responsible for the genetic diversity within the An. gambiae complex: we aim to understanding the genetic basis of hybrid sterility and are using population
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
LEI LIU
Associate Research Scientist
Infectious Diseases
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
lei.liu.ll69@yale.edu

My works are focus on seeking solutions to the problem of arthropod-borne infectious diseases and advancing our molecular understanding of how these pathogens infect their vectors and is therefore a critical step forward in our development of new approaches to control the prevalence of infected vectors.
Dr. Emmanuelle Jacquin-Joly
CV
EcoSens department iEES-Paris
INRA
Versailles cedex Yveline France
emmanuelle.jacquin@versailles.inra.fr
Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
My research focuses on insect chemoreception in a context of plant protection. My objectives are 1) to decipher the molecular mechanisms of olfaction and taste, focusing on chemosensory receptors, 2) to study the contribution of chemoreception to insect adaptation to new hosts and anthropic systems, 3) to investigate the evolutionary origin of insect chemosensory receptors. I am using an integrative approach from genes to behaviour, including genomics and transcriptomics approaches.
Frederique Hilliou
Santé des Plantes et Environnement
INRA
Sophia Antipolis cedex alpes maritimes FRANCE
hilliou@sophia.inra.fr
Institut Sopha Agrobiotech
The team I am working with at INRA of Sophia Antipolis, France, is involved in studying the mechanistic bases and evolution of insect traits essential to adapt to the biotic and abiotic environment. My main project has been developed to decipher the way Lepidoptera adapt to chemically adverse environments (using genomic approaches, and through the prism of the CYP genes and P450 enzymes they encode). We have focused on adaptation of the polyphagous noctuid pest S. frugiperda. We have developed an oligonucleotide microarray covering almost 10,000 genes from this species and contributed to the sequence of ESTs. Transcriptomic results show
LJ Zwiebel
Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Vanderbilt University/Medical Center
Nashville TN USA
l.zwiebel@vanderbilt.edu
LJZlab
We are examining the molecular events of olfaction as this sensory modality predominates most of the relevant behaviors in ants as well as host preference and several other behaviors in mosquitoes to thereby make significant impact to vectorial capacity. Working together with several outstanding collaborators here at Vanderbilt and around the world, we are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which insects transduce chemical signals from their environment into neuronal activity and ultimately behavior. Within Anopheles, we focus specifically on the genetic basis for anthropophily- the characteristic preference for human biting that significantly drives malaria transmission by An. gambiae.
Marc Halfon
Associate Professor
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
mshalfon@buffalo.edu

My laboratory maintains an active research program divided between Drosophila molecular genetics and computational/bioinformatics. Current research in the laboratory falls into three main areas: (a) discovery and characterization of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in Drosophila and other holometabolous insects, (b) promoter-CRM interactions, and (c) mechanisms of specificity for receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, with a focus on mesoderm development. I am also the developer and curator of the REDfly database of Drosophila transcriptional regulatory elements and as such am active in the field of genome annotation and in providing community-accessible database resources.
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA
adingwall@luc.edu

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Judith Willis
Professor Emerita
Cellular Biology
University of Georgia
Athens GA USA
jhwillis@uga.edu

We study the structural cuticular proteins of Anopheles gambiae. Anopheles devotes about 2% of all its protein coding gens these proteins. We have annotated the genes, established the presence of the corresponding proteins in the cuticle with LC-MS/MS analyses. We have published expression patterns for most throughout development. Others have implicated some in insecticide resistance and in the difference between M (now An. coluzzii) and S forms. We have used in situ hybridization to learn where the genes are expressed and immunolocalization on EM sections to learn where in the cuticle the proteins are localized.
Kristina Pilitt
technician
O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland, College Park
Rockville MD USA
gene_queen76@hotmail.com
Faculty Research Assistant
Molecular genetic studies using piggBac transposon-based gene-, enhancer-, promoter-trapping system transformation vectors for creating transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Genotype analysis and characterization of transgenic mosquito lines using molecular techniques such as splinkerette PCR, inverse PCR and gene expression studies using quantitative RT-PCR.
Rob Harrell Robert Harrell
ITF Manager
undergraduate
Insect Transformation Facility
IBBR-University of Maryland
Rockville Maryland United States
harrelr@umd.edu
University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility
The University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility (UM-ITF) provides functional genomics researchers access to transgenic and non-transgenic genome altering technologies. The techniques for altering insect genomes have been available for many years however they have not been widely used, mainly because the technology requires a high level of expertise and specialized equipment. The mission of the UM-ITF is to aid researchers in the creation of genetically modified insects through; fee for service microinjection of insects with developed genome altering protocols, collaboration to develop genome altering protocols for insects without such protocols, training for researchers who are interested in
Channa Aluvihare
Research Technician
technician
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland College Park at Shady Grove
Rockville MD USA
aluvihar@umd.edu
Insect Transformation Facility
Insect rearing for genetic modification, genetically modified organisms and gene delivery systems.
Dr. Marcé Lorenzen
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
marce_lorenzen@ncsu.edu
Marce Lorenzen Lab
To elucidate the molecular mechanism that underlies a class of novel selfish-genetic element found only in Tribolium. Due to the selfish behavior of these elements they have potential as gene "drivers" to push pesticide susceptibility into populations of insect pests of crops, or vector incompetence into populations of insect vectors of disease.
Alfred Handler
Research Geneticist
faculty
Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Gainesville FL United States
al.handler@ars.usda.gov
none
Our research is focused on understanding and manipulating the genes of tephritid fruit flies, a group of invasive pests of significant agricultural importance. We study transposable elements and their use as vectors for germ-line transformation, and development of new vector systems for genomic targeting and transgene stability.
Dr. Jamie Walters
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
jrwalters@ku.edu
James R. Walters Profile
The adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
kmichel@ksu.edu
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.
Dr. Zach N. Adelman
Associate Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
zachadel@tamu.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in my laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Dr. Angela Douglas
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
aes326@cornell.edu
Douglas Lab
All animals are multi-organismal: they are chronically infected by beneficial microorganisms. We study the interaction between animal function and the diversity and activities of resident microorganisms.