Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Fotini Koutroumpa
ECOSENS, iEES-Paris
INRA Versailles
Versailles Ille de France France
fotini.koutroumpa@gmail.com

I am interested in the characterization of genes involved in insects' chemosensation and particularly the ones involved in pheromone and food perception
Michael Smanski
Assistant Professor
Department of Biochem, Mol Biol, and Biophys and the Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St Paul MN USA
smanski@umn.edu

Our group has developed novel strategies to control gene flow between engineered and wild populations.
Maciej Maselko
Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St. Paul MN USA
mmaselko@umn.edu

I am developing Synthetic Incompatibility; an approach for engineering species-like barriers in sexually reproductive organisms. Synthetic Incompatibility has applications for transgene biocontainment in plants engineered to produce high-value compounds and for controlling pest species such as mosquitoes and invasive fish.
Kaylen Brzezinski
Department of Biology
Carleton University
Ottawa Ontario Canada
kaylenbrzezinski@cmail.carleton.ca
MacMillan Lab
My research focuses on how temperature (mainly cold stress) affects paracellular barrier permeability in gut epithelia.
Courtney Clark-Hachtel
Doctoral Candidate
CV
Department of Biology
Miami Univerisity
Oxford OH United States
clarkcm6@miamioh.edu

Studying the evolutionary origin of the novel insect wing using various arthropods.
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
David Kang
Postdoctoral Fellow
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN United States
dkang3@nd.edu
Severson Laboratory
I investigate the impact of stressors on Aedes aegypti mosquito susceptibility to arboviruses. Ultimately, my overarching goal is to capitalize on genetic variation to reduce the transmission of neglected tropical diseases.
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Roopa H.K
Researcher
CV
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
London harrow United Kingdom
roopa21hk@gmail.com

my research focus is mainly on Insect pests management. Implementing eco-friendly management programs like biocontrol, entamopathogens like fungi, bacteria. And also using advance technologies like gene regulation, CRISPR / cas9 system. Identifying insect self limiting genes in case of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci for its management and reduce vector potency to various crops.
Antonis Giakountis
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larisa Larisa Greece
agiakountis@uth.gr
Molecular Biology and Genomics
long non-coding RNAs, chromatin architecture, epigenomics, transcriptional regulation, development
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Changmin Ko
Developmental and Molecular Biology
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Bronx New York USA
changmin.ko@einstein.yu.edu

Role of Wnk in wg pathway and Na+/K+ co-transporter activity
SALMAN KHAN
PhD RESEARCH SCHOLAR
FOREST ENTOMOLOGY DIVISION
FOREST RESEARCH INSTITUTE DEHRADUN
DEHRADUN UTTARAKHAND INDIA
salman1315@gmail.com

BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF FOREST INSECT PESTS; TAXONOMY OF MICRO-HYMENOPTERA; MORPHOMETRICS OF INSECTS; IDENTIFICATION OF NATURAL ENEMY OF FOREST TREES
OLUSOLA SOKEFUN
Dr
Genetics / Bioinformatics
Lagos State University, Faculty of Science, Ojo
Lagos Lagos Nigeria
osokefun@gmail.com
Genetics / Bioinformatics Lab
Phylogeny, Barcoding, Population Genetics
Bianca Kojin
Post-doctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
bianca.burini@gmail.com

Genetic transmission of engineered transgenes.
Michael O. Kusimo
Dr.
CV
Independent researcher
IITA, Benin Station
Ifako-Ogba Lagos Nigeria
gkusimo@gmail.com

1. Molecular detoxification mechanisms in insect vectors and development of new reagents to overcome insecticide resistance 2. Assessment of new model organisms 3. Mapping of the distribution of mosquito-borne pathogens 4. Chromosomal gene screening and testing 5. Directed evolution of genes 6. Understanding the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial resistance genes 7. Development of amber temperature stable enzymes
Maria Kupper
Doctor of Science
CV
Chair of Microbiology
University of Wuerzburg
Wuerzburg Bavaria Germany
maria.kupper@freenet.de

My previous work as a doctoral researcher focussed on the involvement of the Camponotus floridanus immune system in the regulation and tolerance of its bacterial endosymbiont Blochmannia floridanus. I investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic responses of the ants upon immune challenge to provide an overview about ant immune factors. I also analysed differences in immune gene expression between endosymbiont bearing tissues and bacteria-free body parts to understand the role of the immune system in symbiont regulation. The results of the expression analysis revealed low expression levels of genes involved in immune signalling, and in addition the high expression of negative
mike tropak
dr
Genetics and Genome Biology
Sickkids
toronto ON Canada
mbt@sickkids.ca
Schulze
metabolism
Joseph Parker
Genetics and Development
Columbia University
New York NY United States
dibasic@gmail.com
Joe Parker
I study myrmecophilous rove beetles as a model for understanding the evolution and mechanistic basis of interspecies interactions. My aim is to develop certain species as laboratory models for deciphering the genetic and neurobiological basis of their symbioses with social insects.
Jared Koler
Biotechnology
University of Nevada Reno
Reno nv United States
jkoler@nevada.unr.edu
Gulia-Nuss
Lymphatic filariasis (LF), commonly known as elephantiasis, is a neglected tropical disease caused by parasitic filarial worms which are spread by infected mosquitoes taking blood meals required for egg maturation. More than 120 million people in ~70 countries are infected with LF. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers LF a priority in the ‘CDC winnable battles’ to eliminate LF from the Americas. Although drug therapy and mosquito control programs provide adequate control of LF, there are as yet no promising strategies on the horizon for the rise of drug and insecticide resistance in the worm
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Jonas King
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, & Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State MS USA
jonas.king@msstate.edu
kinglab
http://kinglab.bch.msstate.edu/research.html
Karen Kemirembe
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
kuk195@psu.edu
Rasgon Lab
Investigating how Wolbachia pipientis affects mosquito susceptibility to mosquito viruses.
Pinky Kain Sharma
Principal investigator (Wellcome Trust DBT intermediate Fellow)
Department of Genetics and Neurobiology
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, India
Faridabad Haryana India
pinkykain@gmail.com
Laboratory of Genetics and Neurobiology
For any animal, learning about food is an important mechanism that provide animals flexibility in food choices for better survival, hence, it is extremely important to understand how the taste information is represented in the brain.I am interested in understanding how insects make the feeding decisions. This involves identifying neuronal taste circuits in the brain downstream of gustatory sensory neurons that influence feeding behaviors. Physiological state and other factors can act on the gustatory cells and circuits and can modulate taste signals, but these are not well understood in insects. Using Drosophila melanogaster, I will explore into these mechanisms for greater understanding
Rebecca Corkill
PhD student
Cell & Developmental Biology
John Innes Centre
Norwich Norfolk United Kingdom
Rebecca.Corkill@jic.ac.uk
Hogenhout Lab
I am investing transgenic methods in Bemisia tabaci, along with studying th plant-hemipteran interactions.
Olawale Adeyinka
Molecular Biology, CEMB
University of Punjab, Pakistan
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
adeyinka.olawale@gmail.com
Seed Biotechnology
to develop a biotechnology technique that would be efficient to transform Africa indigenous crop against insect pest
Heath Blackmon
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
coleoguy@gmail.com

I am interested in chromosome evolution, specifically, sex chromosome and chromosome number evolution. To address these topics, I use a broad range of approaches including theoretical population genetics, applied phylogenetics, and bioinformatics.
Anthony Clarke
Professor
School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences
Queensland University of Technology
Brisbane Queensland Australia
a.clarke@qut.edu.au

Tephritid fruit flies, especially the genera Bactrocera and Zeugodacus. The lab has interest in the systematics, taxonomy and diagnostics of these species, as well as a focus on their ecology and behaviour with a special interest in host utilisation patterns (e.g. generalism vesus specialsim) and mechanisms of host use. We use genetics and genomics equally with behaviour and ecology. We have also used genomic tools to better understand the response of male Bactrocera to plant derived secondary chemicals (= the so called fruit fly male lures).
sanket deshmukh
AGROCHEMICAL AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY
nagpur maharstra india
sssanketdeshmukh@gmail.com

insilico study for pest managment
SUDHARSAN K
student
Biotechnology
Periyar Manimmai Univerity
Thanjavur Tamilnadu India
sudhantt@gmail.com

Genetics
joe kramer
Instructor/director
pathology
rwjms
piscataway  nj usda
kramerjo@rwjms.rutgers.edu

Epitranscriptomics
Alison Gerken
Post Doctoral Researcher
Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
USDA ARS
Manhattan Kansas United States
alison.gerken@ars.usda.gov

My research focus is on functional genomics of sensory systems in stored grain insect pests. I'm interested in the applied aspects of understanding what attracts insects to stored grain and how we can intercept them. I'm interested in the genetic variation underlying behavioral components associated with attraction to stored grain.
Il Hwan Kim
Postdoc Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
ROCKVILLE  MD United States
il-hwan.kim@nih.gov

Mosquito salivary and hemolymph proteins
Misato Miyakawa
Dr.
Center for Bioscience Research and Education, Laboratory of Environmental Physiology
Utsunomiya University
Utsunomiya Tochigi Japan
misatorus@gmail.com

Invasive ants
John Beckmann
Dr.
CV
Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Yale University
New Haven Connecticut USA
john.beckmann@yale.edu

I study the molecular mechanism of Wolbachia induced cytoplasmic incompatibility in insects. With respect to this I seek to develop transgenes that will be effective genetic units for induction of sterility and application of the sterile insect technique.
Jacob Vinay Vikas Konakondla
Fly Facility
National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR
Bangalore Karnataka India
kjvinayvikas@outlook.com
Fly Facility In-charge
Our facility provides services to the Drosophila researchers in the areas of transgenic generation by P-element, PhiC31 mediated, MiMIC methods. Our facility also carries of developmental work towards enabling modern genome editing technologies including CRISPR/Cas9 in Drosophila.
Linda Kothera
Microbiologist
Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Fort Collins CO US
lkothera@cdc.gov

Genetic changes associated with insecticide resistance in vector mosquitoes.
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Kolja Neil Eckermann
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
keckerm1@uni-goettingen.de

Development of new environmental friendly methods and techniques to improve pest and disease vector control.
Phanidhar Kukutla
Postdoctoral research associate
Department of Anesthesia and Critical Care
Mass General Hospital
Charlestown Massachusetts  USA
pkukutla@mgh.harvard.edu

I am interested in pursuing research that addresses questions related to biology/physiology of disease vectors, host-microbe-pathogen interactions, molecular genetics of host-associated bacteria, and engineering microbes for pharmaceutical/biotech applications.
Zeeshan Shaukat
Dr
CV
Genetics and Evolution
University of Adelaide
Adelaide South Australia Australia
zeeshan.shaukat@adelaide.edu.au
Gregory Lab
Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. As CIN is not found in normal cells, it offers a cancer-specific target for therapy. We generated a CIN model in Drosophila by knocking down the spindle checkpoint, and screened for candidate knockdowns that induce apoptosis only in CIN cells. Genes identified include those involved in the DNA damage/repair pathway, JNK signaling pathway, mitotic cytoskeletal regulation and metabolism. The screen demonstrates that it is feasible to selectively kill cells with CIN. CIN is linked to the
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Prasad Paradkar
Senior Research Scientist
Health and Biosecurity
CSIRO
Geelong Victoria Australia
prasadnp@gmail.com
Vector-Borne Diseases
Interest in mosquito innate immunity against arboviruses. Our lab is working at identification of vector competence factors and whether we can manipulate these factors to prevent transmission.
Ulrich Beckers
Dr.
Department of biology and Department of chemistry
Bielefeld University
Gütersloh NRW F. R. Germany
ulrich.beckers@web.de

I am an neuroscientist interested in coding and signal transmission. I work on cellualar level mostly using electrophysiological methods. I want to evaluate genetic methods for my research projects. Primarily I want to learn more about CRIPR/CAS9. I may also look for potential collaborations (am planning to apply for a grant).
Girish Neelakanta
Assistant Professor (tenure-track)
Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk VA USA
gneelaka@odu.edu
Neelakanta Lab
My laboratory studies host-microbe interactions at the molecular level. Current focus is to understand interactions of vector-borne pathogens with their arthropod vectors (both hard and soft ticks) and their mammalian hosts. In addition, we study several aspects of vector biology in terms of understanding arthropod feeding, behavior to environment stimuli and symbiosis with microbes. We use combination of genetics, molecular biology, genomics, immunology, cell biology and microbiology approaches to decipher important aspects of these interactions.
Katrina Klett
Agronomy
Vietnam National University of Agriculture
Hanoi  Hanoi Vietnam
katrina.klett@gmail.com
Tropical Bee and Beekeeping Research Institute
I am interested in honey bee breeding as a means of selecting for genetic resistance to pathogens and producing robust and healthy bees.
Leela Alamalakala
Research Scientist
Biotechnology R&D
Maharashtra Hybrid Seeds Co. Ltd.
Jalna Maharashtra India
leela.alamalakala@gmail.com
Molecular Entomology Lab
Plant-Insect Interactions, Plant defense responses to phloem-feeding insects, Functional genomics
Rebijith K B
PDN Cambridge
University of Cambridge
Cambridge  Cambridgeshire  United Kingdom
rebijith@gmail.com

My aim is to continue my work on the cutting-edge researchable areas of Molecular Entomology such as RNAi in insect pest management, Small RNAs: their diversity, roles and practical uses, Potential application of CRISPR/Cas9 to control insect pests etc. Moreover, I will strive to work into the real problems of farmers and develop procedures and novel techniques for solving their problems and improving the efficacy of production
Woo Jae Kim
Assistant Professor
CV
Cellular and Molecular Medicine
University of Ottawa
Ottawa ON Canada
wkim@uottawa.ca
Kim lab
In short, the Kim lab is seeking for the fundamental mechanisms how specific neural circuits lead to certain behaviors. We use tiny insect Drosophila melanogaster to answer this question. Dr. Kim has established two behavioral paradigm called ‘Longer-Mating-Duration’ and ‘Shorter-Mating-Duration’. In short term, the Kim lab will focus on identifying functional neural circuits, genetic components, and sensory modality for these behaviors. In mid term, the Kim lab would expand the behavioral repertoires by establishment of automated quantification system of behavior. Beyond this, the Kim lab will establish automated optogenetic & thermogenetic behavioral manipulation system. With the advantage of strong genetic
Johannes Schinko
Dr. rer. nat.
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhone-Alpes France
johannesschinko@hotmail.com

Genetic interactions during posterior elongation in short germ band insects.
Clement Kent
Senior Scientist
Janelia Research Campus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Ashburn VA USA
clementfkent@gmail.com
Heberlein Lab
Insect behavior genetics, genomics, and population genomics. Research foci in Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera.
Singo Kikuta
Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Bio-Applications & Systems Engineering (BASE)
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Koganei Tokyo Japan
singo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

I study the molecular/cellular dynamics involved in insect physiology using fluorescent proteins. My research is to understand transportation of sugars, metabolites or small molecules such as hormone. I develop genetically encoded FRET-based sensors to detect, visualize, and quantify circulating molecules in the hemolymph. And also, I am interested in the gene transfer technologies against non-model organisms to understand specialized characteristics in themselves.
Marko Petek
PhD
Department of Biotechnology and Systems Biology
National Institute of Biology
Ljubljana Osrednjeslovenska Slovenia
marko.petek@nib.si

insect RNAi, plant-insect interactions, insect digestive enzymes
Neha Kulkarni
Bioinformatics
Department of Bioinformatics, Savitribai Phule Pune University (University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
5591.neha@gmail.com

-
Takashi Kiuchi
Assistant Professor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo
Bunkyo-ku Tokyo Japan
kiuchi@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Laboratory of Insect Genetics and Bioscience
Sex determination, Diapause, Host plant preference
Bart Pannebakker
Assistant Professor
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
bart.pannebakker@wur.nl

I am interested in the evolution and genomics of life-history traits and reproductive strategies in insects. My research focuses on the genetic and physiological mechanisms that underlie these traits in parasitoid wasps (insects that lay their eggs on other insects), and in honeybees. I am also Coordinator of BINGO-ITN: Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl. BINGO is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network that develops innovative research training to improve the production and performance of natural enemies in biological control by the use of genetic variation for rearing, monitoring and performance.
Taro Nakamura
Post-Doc / Ph.D
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
arumakanorat@gmail.com
Extavour lab
Insect development and evolution / Live imaging with transgenic cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus / Gene modification (Knock-in and Knock-out) with CRISPR/Cas system and TALENs in Gryllus / Transgenics using piggyBac transposase /
Ferdinand NANFACK MINKEU
Mr
Parasitology and Mycology
Pasteur
Paris Paris 15 France
nanleplot@yahoo.fr

My researches are focused on host-pathogen interactions in African malaria mosquito. Transgenic tools to fight malaria Modification of Tribolium castaneum and Sitophilus oryzae for SIT control
sekhar srikakolapu
Mr.
CV
laboratory of molecular genetics
Center for DNA fingerprinting and Diagnostics
hyderabad Andhra Pradesh india
sekharsri5@gmail.com
Laboratory Of molecular genetics
Elucidation of alternative Splicing mechanism and genome editing through CRISPR Cas9 in Bombyx mori
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Muhammad Akmal
Insect genetic diversity and infection with endosymbionts
CV
Entomology
Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan
Multan Punjab Pakistan
akmal07bzu@gmail.com
lab. of Insect Microbiology and Molecular Biology,
I am working on genetics of Amrasca devastans and its infection with wolbachia.
Pavan kumar
CV
Molecular Ecology
Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research
Ithaca New York United States
pavankumar.sk@gmail.com
Jander lab
1. Improving the potato tuber yield and quality. 2. Decoding the ecological role of plant defensive metabolites. 3. Elucidation of insect detoxification strategies.
Dongho Kim
R&D
agroRNA
Seoul  N/A S. Korea
dkim.gp@gmail.com
CEO
RNAi/insect/plant/dsRNA production/dsRNA formulation/insectcide/herbicide/functional genomics
Hasan Basibuyuk
Dr
Biology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Central Anatolia Turkey
hbbuyuk@cumhuriyet.edu.tr
CUMSAG
My main research areas include higher-level phylogeny, functional morphology, and systematics of Hymenoptera. I am interested in phylogeny and taxonomy of Turkish sawflies, in particularly stem borers (Cephidae), and also molecular systematics, evolution, phylogeny and phylogeography of Anatolian biodiversity. My ongoing research projects are on the evolution of mitochondrial genome in Hymenoptera (mostly sawflies) and utility of COI and ITS2 in barcoding of holo-and hemimetabolous insects.
JohnsonkeW Kinyua
Dr.
Department of Biochemistry
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
Nairobi Kiambu Kenya
johnsonkinyua@jkuat.ac.ke

Development of transmission blocking vaccines
Molly Shook
Postdoctoral Associate
Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois
Urbana Illinois United States
mshook@illinois.edu

Epigenetics of aggression in honey bees
Gary Puterka
Research scientist
Wheat, Peanut, other crops research unit, USDA-ARS
USDA-ARS
Stillwater OK USA
gary.puterka@ars.usda.gov
USDA-ARS, Wheat, peanuts, and other crops research unit
Aphid Pest Management/genetics; Wheat, Barley, and Sorghum aphid resistant germplasm development
Raman Chandrasekar
Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
manhattan Kansas United States
biochandrus@yahoo.com
Research Associate
1. RNA Sequence analysis, Genomic and Proteomics appraoches 2. Study of insect proteins and enzymes will not only give valuable information on their unique biochemistry and physiology but will also identify novel tools for the development of new technologies and new ways to produce novel insect control measures. My main focus is will address the physiological and biochemical functions of proteins and enzymes in the insects’ life processes by using proteomics tools (i.e 2D PAGE, MS, MALDI-TOF, PMF), characterization of novel enzymes, qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their interactions on a genome scale,
BUWAH ZAKARIAH
Mr.
CV
CLINICAL LABORATORY- ENTOMOLOGY DEPARTMENT
KINTAMPO HEALTH RESEARCH CENTRE, GHANA
KINTAMPO, GHANA N/A GHANA
zakariah.buwah@kintampo-hrc.org
CLINICAL LABORATORY, KHRC
Kintampo Health Research Centre is a well-established, African-based, research centre which usually tries to solve public health issues. KHRC is one of three field research centres of the Health Research Unit of Ghana Health Service established in 1994. KHRC is situated in the middle belt of Ghana in the Brong Ahafo Region.
Donghun Kim
Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kp5091@ksu.edu
Arthropod Molecular Physiology Laboratory
I am now pursuing my PhD under the guidance of Dr. Yoonseong Park in the department of Entomology at Kansas State University. My PhD research is to investigate physiological mechanism of tick salivary secretion by using heterologous expression system, pharmacological /physiological technique and NGS analysis.
prof prem raj pushpakaran
professor
BioTechnology
NITC
calicut kerala india
drpremrajp@nitc.ac.in

immunology, bio-informatics
Robert Brucker
Rowland Junior Fellow
FAS - Rowland Institute
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
bruckerlab@gmail.com
Brucker lab
Microbe-host-envoronment interactions and evolution.
Rajendra Chilukuri
Research Assoiciate,
Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Centre for DNA fingreprinting and Diagnostics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Daignostics, CDFD
Hyderabad Telangana India
cverajendra@gmail.com
LMG ,Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Sex Determination and Immunology
Maaria Kankare
Academy Fellow
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyvaskyla
Jyvaskyla Keski-Suomi Finland
maaria.kankare@jyu.fi
Evolutionary Genetics
My research interests are focused on the adaptation to northern conditions at the genetic and genomic levels. Current work is directed to the role of alternative splicing in candidate genes in life-history traits involved in adaptation to seasonally varying environment.
varada abhyankar
MBRl, Department of Zoology
Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune
Pune Maharashtra India
varada.abhyankar@gmail.com
Molecular Biology Research laboratory
Epigenetic and molecular mechanisms involved in immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Valentina Resnik
Intitut für Bienenkunde, Oberursel
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Oberusel Hessen Germany
valentinaresnik@gmx.de

Comparative analysis of metabotropic transmitter receptors in the honeybee and its external parasitic mite Varroa destructor
Alex Mak
asdf
asdf
Baltimore Maryland USA
almak1@umbc.edu

asdf
Jonathan Bobek
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe Arizona United States
jonathan.bobek@asu.edu
Gro Amdam Lab
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of behavior and physiology in the honeybee, Apis Mellifera. Previously I have studied artificial flower color choice of free-flying honeybee foragers, examining relative expression through microarray. I am currently examining gene candidates which may be involved in the transition from nurse to forager roles.
Susumu Hiragaki
PhD
Graduate School of Agricultural Science
Kobe University
Kobe Hyogo Japan
susumu.hiragaki@gmail.com

I am studying about 1) relationship between arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT)/melatonin and diurnal/seasonal physiology in insect, 2) development of new acaricide using unique GABA-receptor, and 3) regulatory mechanisms of insect endocrine system by Rab protein.
Jozef Vanden Broeck
Prof. Dr.
Animal Physiology and Neurobiology (Dept. of Biology)
University of Leuven
Leuven Flanders Belgium
Jozef.VandenBroeck@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
This research group is investigating the physiological role and mode of action of neural and endocrine messenger molecules in postembryonic developmental processes. These processes are studied in an evolutionary context by comparative approaches. In particular, we are studying receptors and their signal transduction pathways in insect cells. Our aim is to unravel the cellular and organismal physiological mechanisms that regulate important post-embryonic developmental processes, such as growth and reproduction. The group is also interested in the influence of environmental factors that can lead to the extreme phenotypic plasticity of locust species. In addition, application-oriented research is carried out to explore novel
Panagiota Koskinioti
Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
pakoskin@bio.uth.gr

My research focuses on the role of the host preference and the presence of symbionts in the genetic profile of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Sujai Kumar
Dr
CV
Institute of Evolutionary Biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Edinburgh United Kingdom
sujaikumar@gmail.com
Blaxter Lab
Building a lepidopteran genome analysis and interrogation environment
George Roderick
Professor and Chair
Environmental Science
UC Berkeley
Berkeley CA USA
roderick@berkeley.edu

Invasive species, population biology, biodiversity, sustainability, biological control, global homogenization
Maike Hink
Biochemistry & Physiology
Pest Control Research
Bayer CropScience AG
Monheim NRW Germany
maike.hink@bayer.com

Insect neuroscience
Yoshiaki Tanaka
Senior Researcher
Insect Gene Function Research Unit
National Agriculture and Food Research Organization
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
yoshiaki@affrc.go.jp
Insect Gene Function Research Unit
Neuropeptide and GPCR
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Laura Boykin
Dr.
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The University of Western Australia
Crawley Western Australia Australia
laura.boykin@uwa.edu.au

I am interested in invasive species (Influenza, Hepatitis C, Carribbean Fruit fly, Whitefly, Asian citrus psyllid, Gypsy moth, Aphid parasitoid, and the Oriental Fruit Fly). My expertise in genomics, phylogentic theory and utilisation of supercomputers has made a substantial contribuion to understanding the evolutionary history of the invasive species. My most influential work has come from contributions (12 publications) to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), the vector of the devastating Cassava Mosaic Viruses.
yosra khalfallah
PhD student
Biology
university of Tunis el manar
Djerba Medenine Tunisia
yosra_khalfallah0607@yahoo.fr
génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures à intéret agronomique
microRNAs implicate in plant pathogen interactions
Subbarayalu Mohankumar
Professor
Plant biotechnology
Tamil Nadu agricultural university
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
Smktnau@gmail.com
Molecular ecology
Molecular ecology of crop- pest interactions, diversity of pollinators , IPM, pest genetics and genomics
Umut Toprak
Associate Professor
CV
Plant Protection/Entomology
Ankara University
Ankara Ankara Turkey
utoprak@agri.ankara.edu.tr
Molecular Entomology (MOLEN) Lab.
My primary research goals are directed towards understanding insect physiological systems using molecular tools and developing new insect control strategies targeting these systems. My current research is focused on: 1) Identification of insect midgut genes and understanding their functions, specifically in lepidopterans and coleopterans 2) Understanding insect lipid metabolism, particularly related to diapause 3) Development of baculoviral biopesticides and their formulation by synergistics targeting insect midgut defense physiology and function
Elizabeth Walker
Lab Manager/Research Tech Sr.
EEB
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan United States
walkeliz@umich.edu
Wittkopp Lab
I am broadly interested in evolutionary development and how that plays a role in the diversity of organisms, including gene regulation
Patricia Wittkopp
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan USA
wittkopp@umich.edu
Wittkopp lab
Our research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution. The evolution of development, especially mechanisms controlling gene regulation, are of particular interest. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work.
Marla Sokolowski
University Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto
Toronto Ontario Canada
marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca
Sokolowski Lab: Genes, Environment and Behaviour
We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences (gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect behavior. Experiential affects, like developmental ones can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but
Subhash Lakhotia
Professor
Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology
Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi UP India
lakhotia@bhu.ac.in

Major current research interests using Drosophila as the model organism: cell stress related gene expression in development, long non-coding RNAs, stress proteins in tumour development, neurodegenerative disorders, Ayurvedic Biology
Simon Bullock
Dr
Cell Biology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
sbullock@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk
Mechanisms of cytoplasmic mRNA transport
Our group is interested in how mRNAs and other cargoes are sorted within the cytoplasm by microtubule-based motors. We exploit the genetics of Drosophila melanogaster for part of our work, and have optimised CRISPR/Cas tools for this organism (www.crisprflydesign.org).
Ramasamy Asokan
Principal Scientist (Agricultural Entomology)
CV
Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bangalore  Karnataka INDIA
asokaniihr@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology
RNAi in the management of 1. Sap sucking insects viz. Thrips, whiteflies, aphids, leaf hoppers, mirids 2. Lepidoptera (Helicoverpa armigera, Spodoptera litura, Plutella xylostella) 3. Discovery and utilization of small RNAs especially microRNAs from insect pests
Takahiro Kikawada
Principal Researcher/ Associate Professor
Insect Mimetics Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (Japan)/ The University of Tokyo
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
kikawada@affrc.go.jp
Anhydrobiosis Research Group- Kikawada Lab
We study the molecular mechanisms underlying an extreme desiccation tolerance, anhydrobiosis in the African midge, Polypedilum vanderplanki, which can revive even if they are completely dehydrated. In the process of this study, we identified several key genes involved in anhydrobiosis, such as LEA proteins and trehalose transporters. Now we have started integrative omics projects of the midge to understand comprehensively the mechanisms.
Ludvik Gomulski
Department of Biology and Biotechnology
University of Pavia
Pavia PV Italy
gomulski@unipv.it
Genetics and genomics of insects of economic and medical importance
We are using transcriptome data to analyze the molecular changes that accompany major physiological and behavioral changes such as maturation and mating in different insect species of medical and agricultural importance. We are particularly interested in transcriptional changes in olfactory related genes.
Dimitrios Kontogiannatos
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology Department
Agricultural University of Athens
Athens Attika Greece
dim_kontogiannatos@yahoo.gr

I am studying the use of RNAi technology in several aspects of Insect Science, like functional genomics, endocrinology and pest management (Baculovirus, bacterial-mediated dsRNA delivery and direct transfer of dsRNAs) in the Lepidopteran species Sesamia nonagrioides.  I am also working with insect cell lines and baculovirus technology in order to express and biochemically characterize important developmental genes of several insect pests. 
Jie Hung, Patricia King
Dr.
Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Universiti Putra Malaysia
Bintulu, Sarawak Not Applicable Malaysia
patriciaking1127@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
Termite digestome: unravelling its enzymes repertoires and secondary metabolites through metatranscriptomes and proteomic analysis; and investigate its gut microbiota using metagenomics approach
Omar Akbari
Postdoctoral Scholar
Biological Engineering
Caltech
Pasadena CA USA
oakbari@caltech.edu
Bruce Hay Lab
My research focuses on developing innovative population replacement methods for manipulating the composition and/or fate of the wild mosquito vector populations in ways that are catalytic: by introducing relatively small numbers of individuals into natural populations, resulting in effects that increase over time and in space, and that are self-sustaining. These approaches utilize synthetically engineered selfish genetic elements designed to rapidly spread themselves with linked cargo genes into wild populations.
Nazzy Pakpour
Assistant Project Scientist
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
University of California Davis
Davis CALIFORNIA USA
npakpour@ucdavis.edu
Nazzy Pakpour
To elucidate the bidirectional effects of malaria on type 2 diabetes and of type 2 diabetes on malaria. By 2030, one in five adults on the African continent will have type 2 diabetes, resulting in epidemic co-morbidity of these diseases. Therefore, a better understanding of the intersection of malaria infection and type 2 diabetes will be critical for the development of future clinical interventions to reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes complications as well as malaria transmission.
Shirley Luckhart
Professor
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
UC Davis
Davis CA United States
sluckhart@ucdavis.edu

General areas of research in the laboratory include: the molecular cell biology and biochemistry of malaria parasite transmission, the functional characterization of the immunological crosstalk and cell signaling that occurs between the mosquito and the mammalian host during bloodfeeding, and the impact of endemic co-infections on malaria parasite development and transmission. Specific research projects include: the conserved signal transduction pathways involved in anti-parasite host innate immunity; systems biology and function of immune factors and cell signaling pathways that are activated between mosquitoes and their mammalian hosts at the interface of bloodfeeding; identification and functional analyses of naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms
Michael Kanost
Distinguished Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kanost@ksu.edu
Kanost lab
My laboratory is investigating proteins present in the hemolymph (blood) of insects, with special interest in the proteins' functions in the insect immune system. We are studying plasma proteins, including prophenoloxidase, serine proteases, protease inhibitors from the serpin superfamily, and proteins that bind to microbial polysaccharides. The long range goal is to understand the biochemical and cellular processes by which insect immune systems recognize and respond to pathogens and parasites. We also investigate the biochemistry of cuticle proteins and their roles in determining mechanical properties of insect exoskeletons. A third current research area is the biochemistry of multicopper oxidases in
Fiona Mumoki
PhD Student
Zoology and Entomology Department, Social Insect Research Group
University of Pretoria
Hatfield, Pretoria Gauteng South Africa
nelimafiona@yahoo.com

I am interested in chemical communication in honeybee reproductive dominance
Jackson Sparks
Postdoctoral Research Entomologist
Invasive Insect Biocontrol and Behavior Lab
ARS-USDA
Beltsville MD USA
jackson.sparks@ars.usda.gov

Our research is aimed at characterizing the molecular components of the mosquito chemosensory repertoire. Our mission is to deliver methods to identify novel repellents or repellent blends. We hope to identify all major molecular classes susceptible to repellent effects in order to screen novel compounds or mixtures. The significance of individual chemosensory genes are validated through chemosensory organ expression analyses, genetic manipulation and electrophysiological and behavioral assays.
Jae Park
Assoc Professor
BCMB
Univ. of Tennessee
Knoxville TN USA
jae.park99@gmail.com

Our research interests are to understand the molecular mechanisms of the programmed cell death in the nervous system using Drosophila as a model. We also have interests in elucidating biological functions of various peptidergic neurons.
Beatrice Clack
Associate Professor
Biology and Biotechnology
Stephen F. Austin State University
Nacogdoches Texas United States
bclack@sfasu.edu

Studying the genomics of Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Sunn pest) and the Prolyl Endo Protease the bug secretes in its saliva that destroys wheat gluten.
Paul Shirk
Research Physiologist
CV
Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit
USDA-ARS CMAVE
Gainesville Florida USA
paul.shirk@ars.usda.gov
Shirk Lab
The Shirk lab is currently creating the genetic and microbiological tools necessary to genetically transform obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria particularly Wolbachia. This requires modification and application of transgenic systems utilized in transgenesis of insects. We are also collaborating with other labs to achieve somatic and germline transformation of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, the varroa mite, Varroa destructor, and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella employing piggyBac vectors.
Kallare Arunkumar
Scientist
CV
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics
Hyderabad Telangana India
arun@cdfd.org.in
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
During the last one decade, research in the silkworm, Bombyx mori has witnessed explosive developments which include unveiling of complete genome sequence; availability of large amount of transcirptomics resources through ESTs, microarray and RNAseq; high density linkage and physical maps; map-based cloning; well-established piggyBac mediated transgenics; TALENs based gene disruption systems; and identification of critical genes for proliferation of baculovirus. The concomitant advancements in other insects such as Drosophila, Honeybee, Mosquito, and Tribolium, particularly in understanding sex-determination mechanisms, microRNA functions, molecular mechanisms of immune response pathways and RNAi-based analysis of gene functions, provide impetus to build silkworm as a basic
Mr. Shreeharsha Tarikere
Biology
IISER Pune
pune maharashtra india
harsha_tts1@yahoo.co.uk

Wing development in insects with focus on lepidoptera
Yoonseong Park
Professor
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
ypark@ksu.edu
Arthropod Molecular Physiology Laboratory
We study molecular physiology of arthropod species to gain fundamental knowledge and to apply the knowledge to improve human life. 1. My research focuses on evolution of neuropepetides, their receptors, and functions. Model arthropods that we study are the species fruitfly (Drosophila melanogaster), red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum), and blacklegged tick (Ixodes scapularis). 2. Ticks are obligatory ectoparasites that feed on the blood of vertebrate hosts and often transmit pathogens. We investigate neural and hormonal mechanisms controlling salivary secretion, involving multiple neuropeptides and catecholamines.
Peter Atkinson
Professor
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
peter.atkinson@ucr.edu
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
Koen Venken
Assistant Professor
Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston TX United States
kv134369@bcm.edu
Team Venken
Genetic Manipulation, Genome Engineering, Synthetic Biology, and Human Disease Modeling in Drosophila melanogaster
Dr. Thomas Kaufman
Distinguished Professor of Biology
faculty
Department of Biology
Indiana University Bloomington
Bloomington IN USA
kaufman@indiana.edu
Kaufman Lab
Using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the long-term goal of our laboratory is to contribute to an understanding of the genetic basis of the developmental program of higher organisms. The homeotic genes, which play a crucial role in development, have been our principal locus. Our research areas include chromatin, chromosomes, and genome integrity; developmental mechanisms and regulation in eukaryotic systems; and eukaryotic cell biology, cytoskeleton and signaling.
Dr. Serap Aksoy
Professor
researcher
School of Public Health
Yale
New Haven Connecticut USA
serap.aksoy@yale.edu
Aksoy Lab
Our lab studies multiple aspects of tsetse flies, the vectors of African trypanosomes. Trypanosomes are the causative agents of the devastating Sleeping Sickness disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lab’s work spans a range of projects including tsetse immunity, reproduction and symbiosis, tsetse-symbiont and trypanosome interactions, tsetse genomics and population genetics, and trypanosome developmental processes in tsetse. The ultimate goal of our work is to improve current control methods and/or develop novel strategies to reduce or eliminate the transmission of Sleeping Sickness in Sub-Saharan Africa.