Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
Anandrao Patil
CV
Department of Bioresource Science
Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore, India
Fukuoka Fukuoka Japan
anandbiotechniques@gmail.com
Laboratory of Insect Genome Science
Insect Molecular Biology, small non-coding RNAs
Michael Smanski
Assistant Professor
Department of Biochem, Mol Biol, and Biophys and the Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St Paul MN USA
smanski@umn.edu

Our group has developed novel strategies to control gene flow between engineered and wild populations.
Lucia Proietti
CV
Zoology
Central University of Venezuela
Hialeah  Florida USA
proietti.dempaire@gmail.com

In my bachelor degree ( from Central University of Venezuela): I worked with Trypanosoma evansi and then I got some ability in trypanosomes diagnosis by PCR and supported the experiments about recombinant protein between T vivax cysteine protease and HSP70. In my PhD (from Ferrara University, Italy): I worked with T brucei 6PGDH. I studied:
Maria Soto-Aguilar
Project Scientist
Department of Plant Pathology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
msotoaguilar@ucdavis.edu

plant-pathogen-vector interaction
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
chithravel vadivalagan
Molecular Entomology, Pest and Parasites Insects
CV
Zoology
Bharathiar University
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
marinedrug.9@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
My field of interest includes Molecular Ecology, Evolutionary genetics of vector born diseases and their potential vectors control by using biosynthesized Nanoparticles. I am much interested in Genomics of pest, parasites and novel haplotype variations for adaptive radiation of vector born diseases
Kaylen Brzezinski
Department of Biology
Carleton University
Ottawa Ontario Canada
kaylenbrzezinski@cmail.carleton.ca
MacMillan Lab
My research focuses on how temperature (mainly cold stress) affects paracellular barrier permeability in gut epithelia.
LI TIAN
Ph.D
Biology
Penn State University
University Park PA United States
lzt22@psu.edu
Hines Lab
Evolutionary developmental biology of mimetic coloration in bumblebee
Anna Crist
Genomes and Genetics
Institut Pasteur
Paris Ile de france France
anna-beth.crist@pasteur.fr

Genetic modification of mosquitoes and nematodes
Adriana Adolfi
Postdoc
Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
University of California Irvine
Irvine California United States
adriana.adolfi@uci.edu
James Lab
Gene drives for population replacement in the malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi
Andrew Guinness
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
aguinnes@nd.edu

Broadly, I am interested in molecular signalling and transgenic targets in insect vectors, most specifically applied to mosquitoes.
David Arnosti
Professor
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Michigan State University
East Lansing MI USA
arnosti@msu.edu

Our research focuses on understanding the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in the context of Drosophila development. We utilize genetic and molecular biological approaches to study the role of enhancers in regulation of signaling and patterning circuits, including insulin signaling, retinoblastoma-mediated control of growth related genes, and chromatin-modulating complexes important for development. Evolutionary perspectives lead us to consider how these processes are active in non-model insects, as well as vertebrates.
Oliver Siehler
Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
oliver.siehler@gmx.de

Social and Neuroanatomical aspects of social entrainment
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Dylan Shropshire
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN United States
dylan.shropshire@vanderbilt.edu

Endosymbiont genetics
Joanna Kotwica-Rolinska
PhD
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Institute of Entomology, Biology Centre , Czech Academy of Sciences
Ceske Budejovice  ‎South Bohemia Czech Republic
askako@entu.cas.cz
Laboratory of Molecular Chronobiology
We are interested in isnsect seasonality which includes hormonal regulation of adult diapause, architecture of the photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), and it's connection to the circadian clock.
Ewald Große-Wilde
Evolutionary Neuroethology
MPI for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thüringen Germany
ewald.grosse.wilde@gmail.com

Arthropod chemosensation.
Matthew Edgington
Dr
Artropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
matt.edgington@pirbright.ac.uk

Mainly working on mathematical modelling of engineered underdominance gene drive systems in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes but also some other classes of gene drive.
Antonis Giakountis
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larisa Larisa Greece
agiakountis@uth.gr
Molecular Biology and Genomics
long non-coding RNAs, chromatin architecture, epigenomics, transcriptional regulation, development
Yiyuan Li
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana United States
yli19@nd.edu

I focus on Comparative Genomics, Gene Family Evolution and Bioinformatics
Ali Zachi
PhD candidate
Plant protection
University Putra Malaysia
Belakong Selangor  Malaysia
alizagi74@gmail.com
Toxicology
Entomopathogenic fungi,bio insecticides,formulation of intomopathogenic fungi
Thanga Suja Srinivasan
Dr.
CV
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Sathyabama University, India
Chennai Tamil Nadu India
sujasree07@gmail.com
Plant Biotechnology Lab
Thanga Suja Srinivasan Researcher Plant Molecular Biology lab Sathyabama University, Chennai 06/July/2017 Research area: My research focuses on rice- planthopper interaction mechanism. Numerous resistant genes and QTL`s have been identified in rice for planthopper management. However the plant- and leafhoppers are able to adapt to the resistant genes within a few years of deployment and the exact mechanism of hopper adaptation to resistant genes is still not well known. The primary objective of the lab is to study the mechanism of hopper resistance and to develop strategies for a durable, broad spectrum and eco-friendly pest management approach. For achieving the primary goal both plant induced response
Karthikeyan Ramiaah
Biological Sciences and Bio Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur
Kanpur Uttarpradesh India
krthkyn@iitk.ac.in
Brain Lab
I will be focussing on using latest genetic engineering tools to edit the genes that code for olfactory receptors. Especially CRISPR cas9 mediated genome editing.
Ritesh Jain
Plant Science
University of Queensland
Brisbane  QLD Australia
r.jain1@uq.edu.au

RNAi mediated control of Lepidopteran insect.
Jianwei Li
CMAVE
USDA-ARS
Gainesville FL USA
jli06@ufl.edu

insect gene editing and genetic sexing
Sheina Sim
Research Biologist
CV
Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center Tropical Crop and Commodity Protection Research
USDA-ARS
Hilo HI USA
ssim8@hawaii.edu

Integrating of genetic, genomic, and genome editing techniques to improve methods for tephritid fruit fly invasion pathway analysis, control, and eradication.
brian weiss
Research Scientist/Scholar and Lecturer
Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Public Health
New Haven CT USA
brian.weiss@yale.edu

My research focuses on deciphering the interactions between arthropod disease vectors and the microorganisms they house. Specifically, I work with the tsetse flies, which vector African trypanosomes. These parasites are the causative agents of human and animal African trypanosomiases in sub-saharan Africa. Tsetse also harbor a community of symbiotic (maternally transmitted) and transient (environmentally acquired) bacteria that modulate many aspects of their host's physiology. I am interested in learning how tsetse's microbiota 1) regulates the development and function of the fly's immune system, and 2) can be harnessed to reduce the fly's ability to transmit trypanosomes.
Bianca Kojin
Post-doctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
bianca.burini@gmail.com

Genetic transmission of engineered transgenes.
Neal Dittmer
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
ndittmer@ksu.edu

I’m interested in exploring how insects make their cuticle (exoskeleton). My main focus is on the proteins present in the cuticle and how they differ between cuticle that is hard versus cuticle that is flexible. I am also interested on how these cuticular proteins may be cross-linked together to help stabilize the cuticle (a process known as sclerotization). One important enzyme in this process is laccase, a member of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family. Many insects have multiple MCO genes and their physiological functions are unknown but likely extend beyond sclerotization. Understanding how the insect cuticle is made may lead
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
ikbal agah ince
School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology
ACIBADEM UNIVERSITY
İstanbul Atasehir TURKEY
agah.ince@acibadem.edu.tr
INCE Research Group / MBT / EPIMARK
I focus on understanding of the complexity of microbe-host interactions applying system biology approaches to provide the scientific basis for the development of novel bio-strategies and designing of bio-processes of products of a wide spectrum of interest in bio-industry. Fundamental/Applied Research Lines; - Detection of pathogen signals in complex biological samples using well established model organisms (in Human, Drosophila, Tsetse, Mosquito. - Manipulation of the host (vector) microbiota to block transmission of pathogens.
Kai-Shu Ling
Research Plant Pathologist
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Charleston SC USA
kai.ling@ars.usda.gov

Study virus-vector interactions, epidemiology and management of insect-transmitted viral diseases, particularly whitefly-transmitted viruses in plants.
Michael O. Kusimo
Dr.
CV
Independent researcher
IITA, Benin Station
Ifako-Ogba Lagos Nigeria
gkusimo@gmail.com

1. Molecular detoxification mechanisms in insect vectors and development of new reagents to overcome insecticide resistance 2. Assessment of new model organisms 3. Mapping of the distribution of mosquito-borne pathogens 4. Chromosomal gene screening and testing 5. Directed evolution of genes 6. Understanding the molecular mechanism of antimicrobial resistance genes 7. Development of amber temperature stable enzymes
Pratibha Srivastava
Biological Scientist IV
CV
Division of Plant Industry
Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
Gainesville Florida USA
pratibha.srivastava@freshfromflorida.com

Our goal is to increase identification capacity and strengthen detection technology, for pests of regulatory significance. Our objective is to improve all aspects of early detection technologies and resources and to develop or improve detection tests and identification capacity for species in a wide range of taxonomic groups containing high priority pests.
Alexander Piper
Research Scientist
Invertebrates and Weed Sciences
Agriculture Victoria Research
Bundoora VIC Australia
alexander.piper@ecodev.vic.gov.au
Chemical Ecology lab
My research focusses on fungal symbionts of pest insects and how microbial volatiles can mediate insect behaviour
Silvia Lanzavecchia
Doctor in Science
CV
Genetics Institute
National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA)
HURLINGHAM BUENOS AIRES ARGENTINA
lanzavecchia.silvia@inta.gob.ar
LABORATORIO DE GENETICA DE INSECTOS DE IMPORTANCIA ECONÓMICA
Our scientific lines of research are focused on insect genetics, population genetics, application of molecular markers and the study of genes involved in physiological and behavioral processes. Our activities are associated to the development of environmentally-friendly control strategies against the most economically important insect pests and molecular characterization of beneficial insects.
Chrystophe Ferreira
coodinator
anmal facilities
Paris Descartes University
Paris ile de France France
chrystophe.ferreira@parisdescartes.fr

trangenesis, mice models of human diseases
Ramkumar Govindaraju
Dr
Biotechnology
Periyar University, Salem, TN, India
Salem Tamil Nadu India
rkentomology@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Toxicology Laboratory
My research is concerned with the biochemical, molecular and proteomic study in the evolution of Insecticide resistance among mosquitoes and to identify novel molecules for insect control. My work includes molecular and proteomic analysis, in addition to understanding the gene expression pattern of detoxification enzymes. Mainly my research focuses on the role of cytochrome P450 and esterase genes in conferring insecticides resistance in mosquitoes and agricultural insects.
Narender Dhania
M.Sc.
CV
Department of Animal Biology
School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad
Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh India
warlock.naren@gmail.com

Assessment of midgut regeneration in lepidopteran larvae upon Cry toxin intoxication.
JAINDER CHHILAR
Dr
BIOLOGY
NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY
LAS CRUCES NEW MEXICO USA
jainder@gmail.com
MOSQUITO GENOMICS
My current focus is on the Anopheles mosquito immunity in context with the gut microbiome and the role of gut microbiota in priming the immune response
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Timothy Ajiboye
Mr
Field Genebank
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology(NACGRAB), Moor Plantation, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo state Nigeria
ajiboyefemi2002@yahoo.com
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology
Molecular Characterization of Cereal stem borers. Control of cereal stemborers using host plant resistance. Conservation of Insects, Tree crops, and other Field genetic Resources.
Olena Riabinina
MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
Imperial College London
London London UK
oriabinina@gmail.com

I am interested in sensory neuroscience and genetics. I have introduced the Q-system into A. gambiae to study olfactory processing in these mosquitoes. I also play around with flies.
Jonas King
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, & Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State MS USA
jonas.king@msstate.edu
kinglab
http://kinglab.bch.msstate.edu/research.html
Alexis Hill
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis MO USA
alexis.s.hill@wustl.edu

Genes and behavior
MUJEEB OLUSHOLA SHITTU
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Michigan Technological University
HOUGHTON Michigan United States
mshittu@mtu.edu
Werner's Lab
Studying the evolution and development of complex colour patterns in Drosophila guttifera
Karen Kemirembe
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
kuk195@psu.edu
Rasgon Lab
Investigating how Wolbachia pipientis affects mosquito susceptibility to mosquito viruses.
Pratima Chennuri
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX USA
pratima.chennuri@live.co.uk

Gene Drives.
Flávia Virginio Fonseca
Biologist, PhD. candidate
CV
Paarasitology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo Sao Paulo Brazil
fvfonsecaa@gmail.com

Scientific Dissemination, Scientific Diffusion, Science Popularization, Community Engagement, Public Engagement.
Syed Hasan Zarain shah Naqvi
Student
CV
Entomology
UAF
nankana sahib punjab, pakistan pakistan
zarain_166@yahoo.com

Insect molecular biology and genetics. IPM. Rearing Techniques for different insect pests like Helicoverpa armigera, Pieris brasicae in Laboratory LABORATORY STUDIES OF BIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND BIOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF GLYCOGEN, TOTAL SUGAR AND LIPID LEVELS OF ECTO PARASITOID BRACON HEBETOR (SAY.) (HYMENOPTERA: BRACONIDAE)
Dave Angelini
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Colby College
Waterville Maine United States
david.r.angelini@gmail.com

I am particularly interested in developmental genetic systems with alternative phenotypic outcomes, such as serially homologous, dimorphic and polyphenic traits. While my immediate research focuses on the mechanisms of these systems, my lab also uses a comparative approach to explore their evolution. Insect appendages are my most common study systems, where I use a combination of methods from functional genetics, morphometrics, endocrinology and genomics.
Jovana Bozic
PhD
School of Biosciences and Veterinary Medicine
University of Camerino
Camerino Macerata Italy
jovana.bozic@unicam.it
Parasitology and Sanitary Entomology
Yeast symbionts of malaria vectors: manipulation of symbionts that can express anti-pathogen molecules within the host (paratransgenesis).
Pinky Kain Sharma
Principal investigator (Wellcome Trust DBT intermediate Fellow)
Department of Genetics and Neurobiology
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, India
Faridabad Haryana India
pinkykain@gmail.com
Laboratory of Genetics and Neurobiology
For any animal, learning about food is an important mechanism that provide animals flexibility in food choices for better survival, hence, it is extremely important to understand how the taste information is represented in the brain.I am interested in understanding how insects make the feeding decisions. This involves identifying neuronal taste circuits in the brain downstream of gustatory sensory neurons that influence feeding behaviors. Physiological state and other factors can act on the gustatory cells and circuits and can modulate taste signals, but these are not well understood in insects. Using Drosophila melanogaster, I will explore into these mechanisms for greater understanding
Rebecca Corkill
PhD student
Cell & Developmental Biology
John Innes Centre
Norwich Norfolk United Kingdom
Rebecca.Corkill@jic.ac.uk
Hogenhout Lab
I am investing transgenic methods in Bemisia tabaci, along with studying th plant-hemipteran interactions.
Gaël Le Trionnaire
Research Scientist
Plant health and protection
INRA, France
Le Rheu Brittany France
gael.le-trionnaire@inra.fr
Ecology and Genetic of Insects
Functional Genomics in Aphids. We are particularly interested on how aphids can perceive changes in day length to switch from asexual to sexual reproduction. We thus develop integrative genomics (RNA-seq, FAIRE-seq and ChIP-seq) to understand large scale genome expression changes but are also currently setting up a step-by-step protocol of targeted mutagenesis with CRISPR-Cas9 system to precisely test for the real function of candidate genes in the photoperiodic response.
Nahid Borhani Dizaji
Post doc fellow
molecular microbiology and immunology
Johns Hopkins University , School of public health
Baltimore MD United States
nborhan1@jhu.edu

my focus interest is on different aspects of vector biology like mosquito-pathogen interactions and dissection of mosquito immunity to Plasmodium and dengue virus infection with emphasis on developing novel strategies against mosquito born disease vectors. As a current post doc fellow I am working on generating of transgenic mosquitoes.
Olawale Adeyinka
Molecular Biology, CEMB
University of Punjab, Pakistan
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
adeyinka.olawale@gmail.com
Seed Biotechnology
to develop a biotechnology technique that would be efficient to transform Africa indigenous crop against insect pest
Nilay Yapici
Assistant Professor, Nancy and Peter Meinig Family Investigator
CV
Department of Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University
Ithaca  NY  USA
ny96@cornell.edu
Yapici Lab
Neural circuits that regulate behavioral states, decision making, motivation and food intake.
Monika Gulia-Nuss
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
RENO Nevada USA
mgulianuss@unr.edu
Vector Biology Lab
My research program investigates the fundamental questions related to vector biology and vector-parasite interactions. I am particularly interested in aspects of reproductive physiology, nutrient allocation, vector competence, and population genomics.
Satyavathi Valluri
Centre of Excellence for Genetics and Genomics of Silkmoiths
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics
Hyderabad Telangana India
vsatya@cdfd.org.in
APEDA CDFD
Im involved in the project 'Development of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) resistant transgenic silkmoths and on the conduct of multilocational contained trials to establish their efficacy and generate data for their regulatory approval'.
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Rakesh Joshi
Assistant Professor
CV
Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology
Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
rakeshjoshi687@gmail.com
Insect Biology Lab
Our group mainly deals with exploring new targets in agricultural pest and developing their blockers, which can be further applied for crop protection.
Željko Popović
Assistant professor
CV
Department of Biology and Ecology
University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences
Novi Sad Autonomous Province of Vojvodina Serbia
zeljko.popovic@dbe.uns.ac.rs
Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
My research is focused primarily on molecular/biochemical basis of insect diapause and adaptation to low temperatures and dehydration. I am interested in the use of -omics studies in research on animal dormancy and adaptation as well as application of bioinformatics in this field.
Mateus Berni
Institute of Biomedical Sciences
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
mateusberni@yahoo.com.br
Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento
Developmental Biology in Rhodnius prolixus
Aniruddha Pandit
Mr
College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences
University of Glasgow
Glasgow Scotland United Kingdom
Aniruddha.Pandit@glasgow.ac.uk

Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, Pest Management, Entomology
Cheolho Sim
Associate Professor
Biology
Baylor University
Waco Texas United States
cheolho_sim@baylor.edu
Vector Biology
Currently, the Sim’s lab focuses on Vector Biology using a combination of genetic, molecular, cell biological and bioinformatical approaches. The two broad areas of work in our laboratory are (1) functional genomics studies of arthropod vectors of human pathogens and (2) diapause research on the mosquito Culex pipiens, which is the primary vector for West Nile encephalitis, Eastern equine encephalitis, and many arboviruses, as well as lymphatic filariases. Within the temperate zones, mosquitoes are limited temporally to just a few months of active development. The remaining months are spent in a dormancy period known as diapause. Depending on the species, mosquito
Julia Ulrich
Dpt. Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
julrich@gwdg.de

RNAi based pest control
Sonja Lindner
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
sonja.lindner@uni-goettingen.de

My aim is to study the RNAi process in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and to apply results to agricultural insect pests.
mona jahani
Ghent University
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
monajahani@gmail.com

Using RNAi technique for investigating the functional genomics and its efficiency for controlling insects
Era Vaidya
Dr
Biotic Stress Resistance
National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
New Delhi New Delhi India
vaidya.era@gmail.com

I am working on using RNA silencing strategies for control of Helicoverpa armigera, which a polyphagous pest of many crop plants
Il Hwan Kim
Postdoc Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
ROCKVILLE  MD United States
il-hwan.kim@nih.gov

Mosquito salivary and hemolymph proteins
Misato Miyakawa
Dr.
Center for Bioscience Research and Education, Laboratory of Environmental Physiology
Utsunomiya University
Utsunomiya Tochigi Japan
misatorus@gmail.com

Invasive ants
Ali Afify
CV
Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins Medical School
Baltimore Maryland USA
ali.afify@jhmi.edu

I am currently investigating the response profile of Anopheles gambiae to pheromones and repellents both at the receptor and glomerulus level.
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
Ma.Anita Bautista
Dr.
CV
Functional Genomics Laboratory
National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Quezon City National Capital Region Philippines
mambautista69@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
I currently handle research projects involving transcriptome and genome analyses of termites and selected insect pests of coconut and rice, an insect parasitoid, stingless bees, plant pathogens, and Philippine coconut varieties.
Thais Rodrigues
PhD
CV
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
thaisbarros.bio@gmail.com

RNAi technology applied to pest management
Richard Fandino
Dr.
Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thueringen Germany
rfandino@ice.mpg.de

My interest is mainly focused on the evolution of gene regulation and expression in chemosensory genes and the role these play in odor-guided behavior of insects. My post-doctoral studies are focused on establishing the ecological model, the sphinx moth, Manduca sexta as a feasible molecular model for receptor / odorant interactions.
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Stephen Panossian
Laboratory Animal Technician Assistant
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Silver Spring Maryland United States of America
stephenpanossian@gmail.com
Insect Transformation Facility
Supporting host-pathogen interaction (mosquito-Plasmodium) research.
Richu Singla
Regional Station
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
richu@pau.edu

Insect Molecular Biology
Ines Elena Martin-Martin
Postdoc Visiting Fellow
Vector Biology Section, Laboratoy of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/National Institutes of Health
Rockville Maryland United States
ines.martin-martin@nih.gov

My research focuses on the study of insect's salivary proteins and their relationship with blood-feeding process and transmission of vector-borne pathogens.
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Mohammad Haddadi
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
University of Zabol
Zabol Sistan and Baluchestan Iran
hadadimohamad@gmail.com
Molecular Neurobiology
Aging and neuronal dysfunction.
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Tonya Colpitts
Assistant Professor
CV
Pathology Microbiology & Immunology
University of South Carolina School of Medicine
Columbia SC USA
tonya.colpitts@uscmed.sc.edu
COLPITTS LAB
Our laboratory researches the interactions between arboviruses and mosquito vectors, with a focus on dengue virus and the Aedes midgut. We are also examining the impact of human serum components on mosquito immunity and virus infection and developing transmission blocking vaccines against arboviruses.
Wendy Smith
Associate Professor and Interim Chair
Biology
Northeastern University
Boston MA USA
w.smith@neu.edu

Regulation of insect growth, development, and immunity
Mohammad Asaduzzaman Miah
PhD Scholar
CV
Insect Molecular Biology, College of Plant Protection
Nanjing Agricultural University
Nanjing Jiangsu China
2014202051@njau.edu.cn
Insect Physiology and Molecular Biology
Molecular mechanism of Insecticide resistance, Functional expression (invitro) of metabolic (detoxification) enzymes ( the genes of CYP450 families) which responsible for insecticide resistance as well as to find out the activities of metabolites (Chemicals/insecticides) in insect body.
Sherry Adrianos
Research Molecular Biologist
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit (SPIERU)
USDA ARS
Manhattan KS USA
7SherryA@gmail.com
Oppert Lab
We are utilizing CRISPR/Cas technology with a goal to control coleopteran storage pests. Tribolium castaneum genes critical for survival are being targeted. These methodologies will be transferred to other stored product pests.
Isobel Ronai
CV
School of Biological Sciences
The University of Sydney
Sydney NSW Australia
isobel.ronai@sydney.edu.au
Behaviour and Genetics of Social Insects Laboratory
My Ph.D. project is on the genetic and mechanistic basis of worker sterility in the honey bee.
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Ewan Richardson
Mr
Biochemistry and Crop Protection
Rothamsted
Brighton Sussex United Kingdom
ewan.richardson@rothamsted.ac.uk

I study the mutations underlying resistance to Diamide insecticides amongst moths. Much of my work revolves around structural study of the Ryanodine Receptor, a calcium channel of major importance in all animals. I use transgenesis to explore the impact of Ryanodine Receptor mutations on pesticide resistance in moths, and to determine whether the same effects can be established in other insect orders.
Erica Lindroth
Testing and Evaluation
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
Jacksonville Florida USA
erica.j.lindroth.mil@mail.mil

My research focuses on the development and evaluation of vector control technology for military use.
Vanessa Corby-Harris
Research Physiologist
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center
USDA-ARS
Tucson AZ USA
vanessa.corby@ars.usda.gov
Corby-Harris Lab
Our goal is to increase honey bee health through improved nutrition.
Patricia Pietrantonio
Professor and AgriLife Research Fellow
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station  TX USA
p-pietrantonio@tamu.edu
Insect Toxicology and Physiology
Insect and tick endocrinology with emphasis in G protein-coupled receptors
Nagraj Sambrani
Postdoc
CV
Lab of Molecular genetics
CDFD, Hyderabad, India
Hyderabad Telengana india
loginnagraj@gmail.com
LMG
My Current Project A major challenge in developmental biology is the elucidation of how changes in patterning mechanisms have contributed to the evolution of morphology. The insect wing is a fascinating developmental system in which to study this question, because of presence of vast diversification in insect wing morphologies. The proposed research will compare
Conor McMeniman
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
cmcmeni1@jhu.edu

My group studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving mosquito attraction to humans, and the impact of pathogen infection on mosquito olfactory perception and behavior.
Duverney Chaverra Rodriguez
PhD Candidate
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
State College Pennsylvania United States
ddc172@psu.edu
Jason Rasgon Lab
My research focuses in exploring and optimizing strategies to produce transgenic insects via maternal injection.
kaleem Tariq
Entomology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Wuhan Hubei China
kaleem_arain194@hotmail.com

Role of miRNAs in spermatogenesis
Karan Singh
PhD Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali
Mohali Punjab India
karansinghlabana1984@gmail.com
Evolutionary Biology Lab
My broad area of research interest is evolutionary genetics and host-parasite interaction. My graduate work is mainly focused on how environmental stress shapes life history traits and underlying genetic mechanisms of increased cold stress resistance. Apart from my work on cold shock resistance, I have also focused on host-parasite interaction and I isolated a novel bacterial pathogen (Staphylococcus succinus) of D. melanogaster that is now being extensively used to study evolutionary ecology of immunity.
Joshua Fisher
Invasive Species Biologist
Ecological Services
US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior
Honolulu Hawaii US
joshua_fisher@fws.gov

Vector Control, Avian Malaria
Kathleen Cuijvers
Biological Sciences
The University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA Australia
kathleen.cuijvers@student.adelaide.edu.au

Alzheimer's research using zebrafish in vivo system.
Giselle Garcia
Committee on Evolutionary Biology
University of Chicago
Chicago IL United States
giselleg@uchicago.edu
Schmidt-Ott Lab
We research the origins and evolution of early development in Diptera.
Rayssa Garcia
Genetic Resources and Biotechnologies
Embrapa
Brasília Distrito Federal Brasil
rayssaag@gmail.com
Plant Pest Molecular Interactions
The research group from the Laboratory Plant-Pest Molecular Interactions (LIMPPI – Embrapa - Cenargen, Brasília - Brazil) is currently working on the development of sustainable RNAi strategies to control crop insect pests. One axe of our research focuses on the relationship between the structure of the dsRNA, its ability to induce gene silencing and its resistance to nuclease activities. On another axe, we focused on the understanding of gene silencing in the insect induced by RNAi produced by the plant. Answering about how, when and at which intensity the dsRNA orchestrates gene silencing inside insect cells are questions that remain
Woo Jae Kim
Assistant Professor
CV
Cellular and Molecular Medicine
University of Ottawa
Ottawa ON Canada
wkim@uottawa.ca
Kim lab
In short, the Kim lab is seeking for the fundamental mechanisms how specific neural circuits lead to certain behaviors. We use tiny insect Drosophila melanogaster to answer this question. Dr. Kim has established two behavioral paradigm called ‘Longer-Mating-Duration’ and ‘Shorter-Mating-Duration’. In short term, the Kim lab will focus on identifying functional neural circuits, genetic components, and sensory modality for these behaviors. In mid term, the Kim lab would expand the behavioral repertoires by establishment of automated quantification system of behavior. Beyond this, the Kim lab will establish automated optogenetic & thermogenetic behavioral manipulation system. With the advantage of strong genetic
Johannes Schinko
Dr. rer. nat.
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhone-Alpes France
johannesschinko@hotmail.com

Genetic interactions during posterior elongation in short germ band insects.
Anna Gilles
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhône-Alpes France
anna.f.gilles@gmail.com

I am working on posterior development in the insect model Tribolium castaneum. In contrast to Drosophila, the abdominal segments of Tribolium develop from a posterior growth zone during embryogenesis in a process similar to vertebrate somitogenesis. My project aims to understand the cellular basis of this by characterizing cell behavior both by in vivo imaging experiments and by clonal analysis. While the posterior growth zone of short germ insects has been described as a proliferative tissue in the classical literature, recent studies and my own data point to cell rearrangement as the main cause of posterior elongation. I am currently
Laura Sirot
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
College of Wooster
Wooster OH USA
lsirot@wooster.edu
Evolutionary and Applied Reproductive Biology
We are broadly interested in the reproductive behavior of animals, including mechanisms that males and females use to influence reproductive success. Our current research focuses on reproductive behavior and physiology in several species including: the pomace fly (Drosophila melanogaster), the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus), and humans.
Tetsuro Shinoda
Division of Insect Sciences
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
shinoda@affrc.go.jp

Molecular mechanisms of juvenile hormone action
Richard Meisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Biochemistry
University of Houston
Houston TX United States
rpmeisel@uh.edu

Evolutionary genomics of sex chromosomes, sex determination, and sexual dimorphism in flies.
Rolando Rivera-Pomar
Professor and Investigator
Centro de Bioinvestigaciones
Universidad Nacional del Noroeste de Buenos Aires / National Science and Technology Research Council (CONICET)
Centro Regional de Estudios Genómicos
Pergamino Buenos Aires Argentina
rrivera@unnoba.edu.ar
Genetics and functional genomics
Our laboratory is interested in comparative genomics of insects. We study early developmental genes and their regulation with a focus on the segmentation process, insecticide resistance-related genes, and small peptides and neuropeptides in different insect species, some of them of medical and agricultural interest.
Singo Kikuta
Assistant Professor
Graduate School of Bio-Applications & Systems Engineering (BASE)
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
Koganei Tokyo Japan
singo@cc.tuat.ac.jp

I study the molecular/cellular dynamics involved in insect physiology using fluorescent proteins. My research is to understand transportation of sugars, metabolites or small molecules such as hormone. I develop genetically encoded FRET-based sensors to detect, visualize, and quantify circulating molecules in the hemolymph. And also, I am interested in the gene transfer technologies against non-model organisms to understand specialized characteristics in themselves.
Maria-Dolors Piulachs
Research Scientist at CSIC
Functional Genomics and Evolution
Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
Barcelona APO/FPO EUROPE / ATLANTIC Spain
mdolors.piulachs@ibe.upf-csic.es
Insect reproduction Lab.
Our long term objective is to elucidate how the oogenesis in insects is regulated, considering the structural diversity of ovary types and their respective evolutionary history.
Neha Kulkarni
Bioinformatics
Department of Bioinformatics, Savitribai Phule Pune University (University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
5591.neha@gmail.com

-
Lyubov Yarinich
Laboratory of cell division
Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Novosibirsk Novosibirskaya oblast Russian Federation
l.yarinich@mcb.nsc.ru

Drosophila cell lines
Anna Katrina Briley
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence/ University of Florida
Jacksonville Florida US
annakatrinabriley@gmail.com

Testing and Evaluation of novel pesticide products and equipment for military use.
Takashi Kiuchi
Assistant Professor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo
Bunkyo-ku Tokyo Japan
kiuchi@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Laboratory of Insect Genetics and Bioscience
Sex determination, Diapause, Host plant preference
Christy Waits
Bioscience Technologist
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Jacksonville FL USA
christy.m.waits.ctr@mail.mil
Testing and Evaluation Department
Test and evaluate novel pesticides and equipment for use in disease vector control.
Megan Fritz
Post-doctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology, Program in Genetics
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
mlfritz@ncsu.edu

I am broadly interested in the evolutionary responses of insects to their constantly changing environment. Humans are an important source of this change, often imposing strong selection on insect populations through management practices. My current research explores how the genomes of Lepidopteran agricultural pests respond to selection imposed by transgenic crops.
Heather Hines
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology, Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
hmh19@psu.edu
Hines Lab
My lab examines the evolution of adaptive trait variation, focusing heavily on the evolution of mimetic patterning. We are pushing a new system for evolutionary genetics and evo-devo in discovery of the genes that are driving the radiation in coloration, largely as a result of mimicry, in the bumble bees. We utilize more descriptive analytical chemsitry, developmental and systematic approaches, and combine these with genomic and transcriptomic approaches to target candidate genes for mimicry and better understand the evolution of this adaptive diversification. Once these genes are targeted we can gain a better understanding of how these novel phenotypes evolved,
Christopher Cunningham
Ph.D.
Department of Genetics
University of Georgia, Athens
Athens GA USA
cbc83@uga.edu
Moore Laboratory
My research focuses on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, such as social dominance networks and parent-offspring interactions. My current model system is Nicrophorus vespilloides, a burying beetle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicrophorus_vespilloides). I am particularly interested in the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in these behaviors and their natural variation. I use many techniques to answer my questions of interest; including, bioinformatics, gene expression, and proteomic tools.
Salim Ansari
Evolutionary developmental genetics
Georg August University, Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony  Germany
salim786biotech@gmail.com

I am one of the screener in the iBeetle project which is a genome-wide RNAi screening in red floor beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Our aim is to knockdown each & every gene of Tribolium castaneum by RNAi technique. We have following three main purpose from iBeetle project. 1. To identify the genes from those process which is either not present in Drosophila (stink gland, embryonic leg development etc.) or difficult to study (head involuted). 2. To make the Tribolium as efficient complementary screening platform to identify the function of conserved gene which is not easy
Fernando Consoli
PhD
Dept of Entomology and Acarology
University of Sao Paulo/ESALQ
Piracicaba Sao Paulo Brazil
fconsoli@usp.br
Insect Interactions Lab
Our lab is dedicated to understand the diversity and role of symbionts in insect bioecology, and to investigate the potential of symbionts for biotechnological exploitation. We also use functional transcriptomic and genomic analyses to investigate insect-insect and insect-symbionts interactions and to develop strategies for pest control (RNAi).
Alexandros Belavilas-Trovas
Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
alexbelavilas@hotmail.com
Molecular biology & genomics-Mathiopoulos lab
The analysis of genes involved in the sexual behaviour of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. Our purpose is the use of these data for the improvement of the SIT approaches or other innovative pest control strategies
T.G. Emyr Davies
Dr
Biological Chemistry & Crop Protection
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire UK
emyr.davies@rothamsted.ac.uk
Senior Research Scientist
Recent research has been focused on understanding the molecular basis of target site (voltage-gated sodium channel, ryanodine receptor) resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, DDT and diamide insecticides in agricultural pests and vectors of human disease. Currently working towards establishing a transformation platform at Rothamsted using CRISPRs/TALENs and transgenic D. melanogaster to study metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms.
Jean-Philippe DAVID
Dr
LECA Grenoble
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (french CNRS)
Grenoble Isère France
jean-philippe.david@ujf-grenoble.fr
Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine
Adapation in mosquitoes including insecticide resistance mechanisms.
Takaaki Daimon
PhD
Insect Growth Regulation Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Japan
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
daimontakaaki@affrc.go.jp

Insect genetics and endocrinology
Waring Trible
Genetics
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
wtrible@rockefeller.edu
Kronauer Laboratory
Ant genetics. I am currently working on developing a CRISPR protocol in the ant Cerapachys biroi, which I will use to study genes relevant to caste differentiation and chemical communication. Past projects include population genetics of fire ants and army ants, fire ant phermone analysis, and phylogenetics of ant evolution.
Ademir Martins
PhD
CV
Laficave
Fundação Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ)
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
ademirjr@ioc.fiocruz.br
Lab of Physiology and Control of Arthropod Vectors
Insecticide resistance mechanisms in insects of medical importance
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Paula Irles
Assistant Professor
Institute of Agronomic Science
Universidad de O'Higgins
Rancagua Libertador Bernardo O'Higgins Chile
pirles@uc.cl

My research focused on the molecular mechanisms under insect oogenesis, specifically which and how signaling pathways are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death during ovary maturation. I am currently work on the role of Hippo signaling pathway during ovarian and embryo development in earwigs.
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Aine O’Sullivan
Department of Entomology
Penn State University
University Park PA USA
aiosullivan29@gmail.com
Grozinger Lab
My research is focused on how bumble bee health can be improved by implementation of different genetic technologies to mitigate the effects of abiotic and biotic stressors.
Jacob Riveron
Postdoctoral Research Assistant
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
jacob.riveron@lstmed.ac.uk
Vector Biology -LSTM
My current research focus is on understanding the molecular basis underlying the insecticide resistance in the African malaria-mosquito, Anopheles funestus, using functional analyses. I also have interest in the functional characterization of genes involved in insecticide resistance in agricultural pests, in insect behavior, and in the elucidation of the molecular basis of the olfaction in Drosophila melanogaster and in malaria and dengue vectors.
Ferdinand NANFACK MINKEU
Mr
Parasitology and Mycology
Pasteur
Paris Paris 15 France
nanleplot@yahoo.fr

My researches are focused on host-pathogen interactions in African malaria mosquito. Transgenic tools to fight malaria Modification of Tribolium castaneum and Sitophilus oryzae for SIT control
Angela Meccariello
Ph.D. student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Naples 'Federico II'
Naples Italy Italy
angela.meccariello@unina.it
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Genetics and transcriptomics of sex determination in pest insects: Aedes albopictus Ceratitis capitata Phlebotomus perniciosus
sekhar srikakolapu
Mr.
CV
laboratory of molecular genetics
Center for DNA fingerprinting and Diagnostics
hyderabad Andhra Pradesh india
sekharsri5@gmail.com
Laboratory Of molecular genetics
Elucidation of alternative Splicing mechanism and genome editing through CRISPR Cas9 in Bombyx mori
Peter Piermarini
Assistant Professor
Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
piermarini.1@osu.edu

My lab investigates the molecular physiology of mosquito vectors with a focus on the excretory system.
kailash lipne
Research and development
Mahyco Research centre, Jalna
Jalna Maharashtra INDIA
kailash.lipne@gmail.com
Research associate
RNAi technology, Insecticidal gene discovery.
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Andrea Gloria-Soria
Associate Research Scientist
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
andrea.gloria-soria@yale.edu
Powell Lab & Turner Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested on the behavioral genetics of feeding behavior in mosquitoes and its consequences for dengue transmission. I also conduct population genetic studies on Aedes aegypti mosquitos to understand historical and recent invasions.
Alicia Timm
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
aetimm@gmail.com

I investigate insect-plant interactions, focussing on plant resistance and insect response to viruses. I also research the taxonomy and population genetics of agriculturally important insects.
Binshuang Li
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY USA
binshuang.li@rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
Identifying the locus controlling wing polymorphism in male pea aphids.
Sarah Maguire
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Belle Mead NJ United States
smaguire@Princeton.edu

I am broadly interested in the biological basis of behavior – especially through neurogenetic and evolutionary perspectives. The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is an ideal model system to study the biological basis of behavior because its attraction to human hosts makes it the number one vector of yellow and Dengue fever, the latter of which affects an estimated 50 million people per year! The goal of my research is to 1) determine the molecular basis of Aedes’s attraction to humans as well as 2) map the neural circuitry underlying Aedes’s attraction and repulsion behavior.
Jason Hill
Zoologi
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
jason.hill@zoologi.su.se

Lepidopteran evolutionary genomics. Specifically butterfly adaptation in the wild.
Soren Nylin
Professor
Zoology
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
soren.nylin@zoologi.su.se

Seasonal adaptations, life history, life cycle regulation in butterflies. Insect-plant relationships.
Dongho Kim
R&D
agroRNA
Seoul  N/A S. Korea
dkim.gp@gmail.com
CEO
RNAi/insect/plant/dsRNA production/dsRNA formulation/insectcide/herbicide/functional genomics
Hasan Basibuyuk
Dr
Biology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Central Anatolia Turkey
hbbuyuk@cumhuriyet.edu.tr
CUMSAG
My main research areas include higher-level phylogeny, functional morphology, and systematics of Hymenoptera. I am interested in phylogeny and taxonomy of Turkish sawflies, in particularly stem borers (Cephidae), and also molecular systematics, evolution, phylogeny and phylogeography of Anatolian biodiversity. My ongoing research projects are on the evolution of mitochondrial genome in Hymenoptera (mostly sawflies) and utility of COI and ITS2 in barcoding of holo-and hemimetabolous insects.
Scott Geib
Research Entomologist
DKI-PBARC
USDA-ARS
Hilo Hawaii United States
scott.geib@ars.usda.gov

Genomics of Tephritid fruit flies. Whole genome sequencing, trait association, QTL, Linkage mapping, Functional Genomics, RNAi, CRISPR/CAS
Chris Jiggins
Professor
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambridge UK United Kingdom
c.jiggins@zoo.cam.ac.uk
Chris Jiggins
Adaptation and speciation in butterflies, especially focussing on wing pattern development and evolution. Interested to develop transgenic tests of wing pattern developmental factors
JohnsonkeW Kinyua
Dr.
Department of Biochemistry
Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
Nairobi Kiambu Kenya
johnsonkinyua@jkuat.ac.ke

Development of transmission blocking vaccines
Zain UlAbdin
Dr./Assistant Professor
Entomology
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
zainunibas@gmail.com
"Insect Molecular Biology Lab."
Insect parasitoids have evolved an amazing array of mechanisms to manipulate host physiology and biochemistry and they are able to suppress the immune response of the host and to disrupt its development and reproduction. The virulence and host regulation factors triggering these alterations are injected by the ovipositing females in their hosts. The astonishing richness of species in the parasitic Hymenoptera pro¬vides a unique reservoir of molecular biodiversity for new bio¬insecticide molecules, targeting a number of insect species and developmental stages. Host-parasitoid associations in insects offer an impressive opportunity to identify new genes and molecules responsible for the major
Dave Denlinger
CV
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
david.denlinger@aggiemail.usu.edu
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Konstantina Tsoumani
Post-Doctoral Research Associate
CV
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
kotsouma@bio.uth.gr
Molecular biology & Genomics - Mathiopoulos Lab
Genomic and transcriptomic analyses using NGS data, identification and functional analyses of genes involved 1) in reproductive behaviour including the olfactory and gustatory systems of the olive fruit fly, as well as 2) in embryogenesis, that can be used in the development of new genetic control strategies of the olive fly.
MARIA ELENI GRIGORIOU
Biochemistry- Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
magrigoriou@bio.uth.gr
Marilena
Transcriptomic analysis of the reproductive system of Bactrocera oleae. Detection of molecules involved in reproduction.
BUWAH ZAKARIAH
Mr.
CV
CLINICAL LABORATORY- ENTOMOLOGY DEPARTMENT
KINTAMPO HEALTH RESEARCH CENTRE, GHANA
KINTAMPO, GHANA N/A GHANA
zakariah.buwah@kintampo-hrc.org
CLINICAL LABORATORY, KHRC
Kintampo Health Research Centre is a well-established, African-based, research centre which usually tries to solve public health issues. KHRC is one of three field research centres of the Health Research Unit of Ghana Health Service established in 1994. KHRC is situated in the middle belt of Ghana in the Brong Ahafo Region.
Claudio Ramirez
Associate Professor
Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas
Universidad de Talca
Talca Talca Chile
clramirez@utalca.cl
Laboratorio de Interacciones Insecto-Planta
I am interested on insect-plant interactions emphasizing proximal (ecological) and distal (evolutionary) causes. This approach is intended to elucidate insect herbivory patterns in native and productive systems. From the proximal point of view, I have been studying behavioural and morphological mechanisms underlying insect-feeding patterns, as well as plant responses to insect herbivory. Concerning distal causes, I am looking for experimental or co-relational association between proximal causes and reproductive output, as well as their phylogenetic associations.
YINGJUN CUI
Postdoctral research scholar
Entomology
University of Kentucky
lexington Kentucky USA
cuiyingjun@uky.edu

insect molecular biology on development,metamorphosis, reproduction.
Laura Harrington
Professor
Department of Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
lch27@cornell.edu
Harrington lab
Research in the Harrington lab focuses on mosquito vector ecology, biology, and behavior. Our goal is to understand basic (and often overlooked) aspects of mosquito biology in order to identify new targets for controlling mosquitoes and reducing transmission of vector-borne diseases.
Donghun Kim
Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kp5091@ksu.edu
Arthropod Molecular Physiology Laboratory
I am now pursuing my PhD under the guidance of Dr. Yoonseong Park in the department of Entomology at Kansas State University. My PhD research is to investigate physiological mechanism of tick salivary secretion by using heterologous expression system, pharmacological /physiological technique and NGS analysis.
Karl Joplin
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
East Tennessee State University
Johnson City Tennessee USA
joplin@etsu.edu
Karl Joplin
Physiology and molecular biology of diapause, Insect behavior and circadian rhythms, Stress response of insects
Bryony Bonning
Director, NSF I/UCRC
Department of Entomology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
bbonning@ufl.edu
Insect Management Technology
Molecular interactions between viruses and insects, and between microbe-derived insect toxins and their receptors. Fundamental knowledge of these interactions is then used to optimize current insect pest management strategies and to develop novel environmentally benign solutions.
Roya Nasirian
Plant Protection
University of Mohaghegh Ardabili
Ardebil IRAN IRAN
nasirian.roya@yahoo.com

Investigate digestive enzymes
Feng Cui
Associate Professor
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects & Rodents
Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
cuif@ioz.ac.cn
Eco-genomics and Adaptation Group
Research directions: Molecular mechanisms of interactions between insects and plants or plant viruses 1. Functions and mechanisms of salivary gland genes in aphid’s response and adaptation to host plants 2. Molecular mechanisms of small brown plant hopper-RSV-rice interactions
DEEPAK KUMAR SINHA
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology
M.M. University, India
AMBALA HARYANA INDIA
deepak22sinha@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Entomologist
I developed deep interest in insect pest biology with regards to its interaction with host. My research area deals with understanding the molecular basis of insect-plant interactions. In this broad field, I am specially interested in insect pests of crops such as rice and wheat. I have worked on gall midge, aphids and want to focus more on yellow stem borers. I want to understand aspects of virulence of these pests and also investigate into the role of different gut bacteria in virulence.
Hua Bai
Investigator
CV
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Brown University
Providence RI USA
hua_bai@brown.edu

Neuroendocrine regulation of insect development, reproduction, metabolism and aging
David Majerowicz
Msc., PhD.
Faculdade de Farmacia
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
majerowicz@pharma.ufrj.br

Use of insect as models for lipid metabolsim and obesity; Role of nuclear receptors and hormones in the control of lipid metabolism; Role of nuclear receptors in the Rhodnius prolixus - Trypanossoma cruzi interaction.
Samuel Helrich
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
samuel.helrich@tufts.edu

Bioactuation
feng liu
PhD student
Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology
Auburn University
Auburn AL USA
fzl0009@auburn.edu
Insect Toxicology and Physiology
insect olfaction, electrophysiology and chemical ecology
Rajendra Chilukuri
Research Assoiciate,
Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Centre for DNA fingreprinting and Diagnostics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Daignostics, CDFD
Hyderabad Telangana India
cverajendra@gmail.com
LMG ,Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Sex Determination and Immunology
Trevor Wardill
BBSRC David Phillips Fellow
Physiology, Development and Neuroscience Department
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
tjw79@cam.ac.uk

I study how visual information in various species of flies is integrated in the brain, looking particularly how colour and motion signals are combined and used in behaviours such as finding mates and food. This research aims to discover some of the principles of how neurons decide which information is important and which to discard, and which has the greatest priority. In the coming year I will hire a postdoc to help my plans to make genetic tools that will make non-model species more accessible to transgenic alteration.
Gary Blissard
Professor
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
gwb1@cornell.edu
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
Jason Pitts
Research Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Baylor University
Nashville Tennessee United States
jason_pitts@baylor.edu

I am interested in answering fundamental questions about the chemical ecology and sensory biology of disease vector insects. Chemoreception is a major driver of multiple insect behaviors, all of which are critical for survival and reproduction. The molecular basis for many peripheral chemoreception events is still poorly understood, although some insect chemoreceptor gene families, such as odorant receptors and variant ionotropic receptors, have been identified. My research is focused on many aspects of insect chemosensation including novel gene discovery, gene expression analysis, and receptor function. My long-term objective is to contribute to reductions in human disease transmission at the local
Arnubio Valencia
Plant Sciences
Universidad de Caldas
Manizales Caldas Colombia
arnubio.valencia@ucaldas.edu.co

Research activities are focused on the study of transcripts (RNAm) from the intestinal tract of insect pests, in order to find some target insect genes that could be silenced using RNAi technology. In addition, I am also interested in cloning and expression of insect genes involved with the digestion of cellulose with potential to be used in future programs related with bioenergy production and Insect transcriptome analysis.
Maria P Zappia
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago IL USA
mpzappia@uic.edu

The E2F transcription factor regulates the expression of genes involved in a broad range of processes including cell cycle progression, cell differentiation and cell death. Our group recently discovered a novel role for E2F in the regulation of mitochondrial activity.
Nasiru Ibrahim
Prof
Crop Science
Usmanu Danfodiyo University,Sokoto,Nigeria
Sokoto Sokoto Nigeria
dolegoronyo@yahoo.com

My interest is looking at different plants for thier potential in controlling insect pest of field and stored produce
Natalia Vinasco Arias
Biological Control Researcher
Caldas University
Manizales Caldas Colombia
vinasco.natalia@gmail.com

I'm Agronomic Engineer with specialization in Biological Control, IPMs and Biology Molecular of Insects pest. In this moment, I'm working in paratiroides of order Diptera for control of weevils and other pest of citrus and fruits of region. Also, I´m working in peptides antimicrobial of plants for include in the control of bacterias and insects pest.
Wang Liuhao
School of Resource and Environment Science
Henan Institute of Science and Technology
Xinxiang Henan China
liuhaowang2007@163.com

Heat shock transcription factor of Bemisia tabaci
Patricia Jumbo Lucioni
Postdoctoral research scholar
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN USA
patricia.jumbo@vanderbilt.edu
Postdoctoral Research Scholar-Broadie Lab
My current research field addresses the unknown mechanisms behind inborn errors of metabolism, classic galactosemia and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Patients with these disorders grow to develop neurodevelopmental complications of unknown mechanism which lack appropriate treatment. I use fruit flies as genetic models to characterize these phenotypes and elucidate disease mechanisms underlying these chronic inborn deficits.
Ming Li
Ph.D Student
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Auburn University
Auburn Alabama United states
mzl0025@auburn.edu

Molecular mechanisms of insecticide resistance development
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Julia Bristow
Biological Sciences
Syngeta
Bracknell Berkshire England
Julia.Bristow@syngenta.com

Molecular Biology and Genetics
Scott Emrich
Computer Science and Engineering
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
semrich@nd.edu

Arthropod bioinformatics with a focus on vectors and ecologically important genome improvement/analysis
Valentina Resnik
Intitut für Bienenkunde, Oberursel
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Oberusel Hessen Germany
valentinaresnik@gmx.de

Comparative analysis of metabotropic transmitter receptors in the honeybee and its external parasitic mite Varroa destructor
Xinghui Qiu
Dr.
Institute of Zoology
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
qiuxh@ioz.ac.cn

Insect biochemistry and toxicology cytochrome P450s
Alekos Simoni
Department of Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London London United Kingdom
a.simoni@imperial.ac.uk

Applying state of the art molecular biology to vector control with the aim of reducing malaria transmission
Simon Collier
PhD
Department of Genetics
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
psc38@cam.ac.uk
Fly Facility
Drosophila genome modification Planar Cell Polarity
Susumu Hiragaki
PhD
Graduate School of Agricultural Science
Kobe University
Kobe Hyogo Japan
susumu.hiragaki@gmail.com

I am studying about 1) relationship between arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT)/melatonin and diurnal/seasonal physiology in insect, 2) development of new acaricide using unique GABA-receptor, and 3) regulatory mechanisms of insect endocrine system by Rab protein.
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Ifeoma Ezugbo-Nwobi
Parasitology and Entomology
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka Anambra Nigeria
ifeomaezugbonwobi@yahoo.com
Parasitology and Entomology Research Lab
Focused on understanding vector-borne diseases like Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Dengue, Yellow fever, etc, so that better control measures can be developed. I seek to integrate traditional parasitological and entomological procedures with molecular genetics and bioinformatics-based technologies to deliver new insights into vector biology and ecology.
Isidoro Feliciello
Dr.
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery
University of Naples Federico II
Napoli NA Italy
ifelicie@unina.it
Laboratory of Experimental Biology
Satellite DNAs of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum: roles in genome dynamic and gene expression.
Helena Richardson
Group Leader
CV
Research
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne V ictoria Australia
Drh_richardson@yahoo.com.au
Cell cycle and development lab
My research ulilizes the vinegar fly, Drosophila, to model tumourigenesis, with the vision of understanding how regulators of cell polarity and the actin cytoskeleton impact on cell signalling and cell proliferation, a field in which she is internationally recognised. She collaborates with mammalian researchers to translate her findings to mouse and human cancer models.
Vassiliki Bariami
Dr.
CV
Bioresources Project-Group
Justus Liebig University
Giessen Hessen Germany
vassiliki.bariami@ime.fraunhofer.de
Risk Assessment of Transgenics
In my early scientific pursuits my main focus has been the unveiling of genes and pathways implicated in insect and more specifically, mosquito insecticide resistance establishment. Having seen first hand that resistance development is rapidly undermining mosquito control efforts my research interest and focus have shifted towards the development of eco- friendly transgene based tools for mosquito management .
Panagiota Koskinioti
Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
pakoskin@bio.uth.gr

My research focuses on the role of the host preference and the presence of symbionts in the genetic profile of the Mediterranean fruit fly.
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
Ariel Chipman
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Israel Israel
ariel.chipman@huji.ac.il

Arthropod evo-devo
Adriana Costero-Saint Denis
Vector Biology Program Officer
Div. of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Rockville Maryland USA
acostero@niaid.nih.gov

Vector biology
Sonam Vijay
Research Associate
Protein Biochemistry and Structural Biology Lab
National Institute of Malaria Research
New Delhi Delhi INDIA
sonam.vijay@gmail.com
Research Associate
At present we are focusing on global and differential proteome analysis of An. culicifacies sensitive and refractory mosquito species. We are interested to find out those proteins in midgut and salivary glands that may have role in mechanism of refractoriness.
Marcos Pereira
Full Professor
Department of Parasitology
Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG)
Belo Horizonte Minas Gerais Brazil
marcoshp@icb.ufmg.br
Laboratory of Physiology of Hematophagous Insects
Our group is dedicated to the study of feeding behaviour and of bioactive molecules from blood-sucking insects. We use distinct and complementary approaches to investigate of the feeding process involving electrophysiology and image analysis. These evaluations are complemented by biochemical characterization of molecules present in the insect saliva and midgut that assist in the blood meal and with functional analysis (RNAi) of target genes in vivo.
Rodney Richardson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Columbus  Ohio USA
richardson.827@osu.edu

My research efforts focus on issues pertaining to toxicology and immunology in the European honey bee. Specifically, I am interested in the discovery and mechanistic explanation of how environmentally encountered xenobiotics affect insect immune function.
Hongmei Li-Byarlay
NRC Research Fellow
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
hlibyar@ncsu.edu

I'm working on insect genomics, stress, and social behavior. My research interests include how genetic or epigenetic marks regulate gene activities in natural conditions as well as different stress conditions, or how they affects social behaviors of insects.
Derric Nimmo
Product Development Manager
Public Health Research
Oxitec
Abingdon Milton Park United Kingdom
derric.nimmo@oxitec.com

My career has given me a broad background in insect and parasite molecular biology. My PhD. looked for novel mechanisms of drug resistance in Leishmania sp. leading to postdoctoral work that concentrated on the genetic transformation of mosquitoes (Ae. aegypti, An, stephensi and An, gambiae) and the development of site-specific integration systems for genes. I started at Oxitec in 2005 as Head of Public Health Research with the aim of developing new RIDL systems in mosquitoes, supported by a Gates grant of $5 million. From this work we produced the new products in mosquitoes and published this work in Nature
Kostas Iatrou
Prof
Institute of Biosciences & Applications
National Centre for Scientific Research 'Demokritos"
Aghia Paraskevi (Athens) Attiki Greece
iatrou@bio.demokritos.gr
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Developmental biology of oogenesis in lepidopteran insects (Bombyx mori model) and olfaction in anopheline mosquitoes (Anopheles gambiae model). Identification of insect endocrine regulators and methods for fast identification of mosquito attractants and repellents of natural origin. Molecular biology and engineering of baculoviruses (BmNPV and AcNPV models) for development as insect transduction and transformation vectors.
Mark Guillotte
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
University of Maryland Baltimore
Baltimore Maryland United States
mguil33@gmail.com

Vector-borne disease
Susan Villarreal
Postdoctoral Associate
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
smv32@cornell.edu
Laura Harrington Lab
Exploring the genetic components to insect mating behavior
George Roderick
Professor and Chair
Environmental Science
UC Berkeley
Berkeley CA USA
roderick@berkeley.edu

Invasive species, population biology, biodiversity, sustainability, biological control, global homogenization
Vandana Hivrale
Dr. Vandana Hivrale
CV
Department of Biochemistry and molecular biology
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Ok, USA
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
vandanahivrale@hotmail.com
Biochemistry and molecular biology
At my institute (Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad), we are attempting to screen of non-host Protease inhibitor /Amylase inhibitor proteins for developing Helicoverpa armigera tolerance in important crop plants like pigeonpea, cotton and tomato. In India, H. armigera is responsible for preharvest losses of pigeonpea, chickpea, cotton, tomato, okra etc and storage pests such as callosobruchus and tribolium spp for post harvest damage. One of the sustainable solutions to this problem is development of insect-resistant transgenic plants using two transgenes (PI/AI), however, effect of such transgene expression in these plants has yet to be investigated.
Gulsaz Shamim
CV
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
gulsazshamim@gmail.com
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
TRANG LE THI DIEU
Dr.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
ltdtrang@hcmuaf.edu.vn
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Gianluca Tettamanti
Associate Professor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
University of Insubria
Varese --- Italy
gianluca.tettamanti@uninsubria.it
Laboratory of Invertebrate Biology
- Cell death and regeneration in insect development - Insect biotechnology - Immune response in insects
Maike Hink
Biochemistry & Physiology
Pest Control Research
Bayer CropScience AG
Monheim NRW Germany
maike.hink@bayer.com

Insect neuroscience
Jorge Vieira
Professor
Molecular Evolution Lab
IBMC
Porto Porto Portugal
jbvieira@ibmc.up.pt
Molecular Evolution lab
Molecular Evolution with a focus on Drosophila (including non-melanogaster species).
Nico Posnien
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
nico.posnien@gmail.com

My main focus of our research is understanding the molecular basis of natural variation in complex morphological traits. We mainly work on insect and spider systems and apply genome wide approaches in combination with classical developmental biology methods.
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran
m.ghafourim@yahoo.com

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
Gerald Wilkinson
Professor
Biology
University of Maryland
College Park Maryland USA
wilkinso@umd.edu
Wilkinson Lab
Stalk-eyed flies are being used as a model system for studying the evolution of sexually selected traits. Our recent empirical and theoretical results have surprisingly implicated meiotic drive as a potent evolutionary agent which can catalyze sexual selection. Using quantitative trait locus studies we have shown that sex-linked genes that influence a sexually selected trait are linked to genes causing sex chromosome meiotic drive. By hybridizing genomic DNA to custom Agilent microarrays we also discovered that stalk-eyed flies contain a neo-X chromosome and that genes have moved both onto and off of this chromosome. We are currently using
Laura Boykin
Dr.
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The University of Western Australia
Crawley Western Australia Australia
laura.boykin@uwa.edu.au

I am interested in invasive species (Influenza, Hepatitis C, Carribbean Fruit fly, Whitefly, Asian citrus psyllid, Gypsy moth, Aphid parasitoid, and the Oriental Fruit Fly). My expertise in genomics, phylogentic theory and utilisation of supercomputers has made a substantial contribuion to understanding the evolutionary history of the invasive species. My most influential work has come from contributions (12 publications) to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), the vector of the devastating Cassava Mosaic Viruses.
Zhou Qiang
Professor
State Key Laboratory of Biological Control
Sun Yat-sen University
Guangzhou  Guangdong P R China
lsszhou@mail.sysu.edu.cn
Insect-Plant biololgy
The effect of rice nutrtion on the reproduction and development of insect
Ronald van Rij
Medical Microbiology
Radboudumc and Radboud Inst for Molecular Life Sciences
Nijmegen - Nijmegen
r.vanrij@ncmls.ru.nl

My lab is interested in antiviral immunity in insects. We study small RNA-based defense systems (siRNA and piRNA) in fruit flies and mosquitoes, and mechanisms by which viruses suppress these responses. Other interests include the identification of non-RNAi based mechanisms of antiviral defense and epigenetic control of innate immunity.
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
Mustafa Wajidi
Associate Professor
CV
School of Distance Education
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Minden Pulau Pinang Malaysia
mfadzil@usm.my
Molecular Entomology Research Group
Current research focuses on insect molecular biology, in particular, trying to elucidate the role of cytochromes P450 in metabolism of xenobiotics
Patricia Wittkopp
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan USA
wittkopp@umich.edu
Wittkopp lab
Our research investigates the genetic basis of phenotypic evolution. The evolution of development, especially mechanisms controlling gene regulation, are of particular interest. Molecular and developmental biology, population and quantitative genetics, genomics and bioinformatics are integrated in this work.
Marla Sokolowski
University Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Toronto
Toronto Ontario Canada
marla.sokolowski@utoronto.ca
Sokolowski Lab: Genes, Environment and Behaviour
We are interested in how DNA variation predisposes organisms to be more or less affected by their experiences (gene-environment interactions), how our experience gets embedded in our biology (epigenetics) and finally how DNA variation interacts with epigenetic processes to affect behavior. Experiential affects, like developmental ones can occur on different time scales. For example nutritional or social adversity (or enrichment) can occur throughout an organisms life, in early life alone with enduring effects on later life stages, or acutely over a matter of minutes or hours. To address these issues we take a genetic perspective using mostly Drosophila melanogaster but
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Subhash Lakhotia
Professor
Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology
Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi UP India
lakhotia@bhu.ac.in

Major current research interests using Drosophila as the model organism: cell stress related gene expression in development, long non-coding RNAs, stress proteins in tumour development, neurodegenerative disorders, Ayurvedic Biology
Dr. Md Saheb Ali
Senior Researcher (Senior Scientific Officer)
CV
Agriculture Wing/Faculty
Bangladesh Jute Research Institute
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan and Utsunomiya University, Japan
Utsunomiya & TUAT, TOKYO JAPAN
sahebbjri@yahoo.com
Lab of Insect Molecular Biology/ Lab of Insect Biotechnology
My research interest focused to clarify the regulatory mechanism of cuticular protein gene expression of insect using reverse-transcriptase PCR, real-time PCR, cloning, plasmid construction, histology, site-directed mutagenesis, gene-gun and reporter construct preparation, transient expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay.
Mauro Mandrioli
PhD
Life Sciences
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Modena Italy Italy
mauro.mandrioli@unimo.it
Insect genetics and Biosciences Lab
Insect cytogenetics and microbiome analysis
Ashok Giri
Sr. Scientist
CV
Biochemical Sciences
CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory
Pune Maharashatra India
ap.giri@ncl.res.in
Plant Molecular Biology Unit
Plant defence mechanisms: We developed group at CSIR-NCL focusing on agricultural biotechnology of high relevance to the current problems. Insect pests are globally severe threat to agriculture where we addressed questions related to molecular insights of plant-insect interactions. Understanding of the plant-insect interaction at molecular level will serve as basis for developing strategies for plant protection in sustainable manner with minimizing use of chemicals. Detoxification mechanisms in insects: To obtain molecular insights in to detoxification mechanisms in Lepidopteran insect pest, Helicoverpa armigera, we are employing "omics" approaches upon exposure of insect to different phytochemicals and insecticide molecules.
Takahiro Kikawada
Principal Researcher/ Associate Professor
Insect Mimetics Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (Japan)/ The University of Tokyo
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
kikawada@affrc.go.jp
Anhydrobiosis Research Group- Kikawada Lab
We study the molecular mechanisms underlying an extreme desiccation tolerance, anhydrobiosis in the African midge, Polypedilum vanderplanki, which can revive even if they are completely dehydrated. In the process of this study, we identified several key genes involved in anhydrobiosis, such as LEA proteins and trehalose transporters. Now we have started integrative omics projects of the midge to understand comprehensively the mechanisms.
Carlos Gustavo Nunes Silva
Professor
Department of Genetics
Universidade Federal do Amazonas
Manaus Amazonas Brazil
cgmanaus@gmail.com
Lab. DNA technologies
"Beeotechnology"
Maria Cristina Silva
PhD.
CV
Biotechniology
Embrapa Genetic Resource and Biotechnology
Brasilia DF BRAZIL
cristina.mattar@embrapa.br
Plant Pest Molecular Interaction
Specialist in plant molecular biology, works in the area of plant biotechnology aimed at resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. Undertakes research focusing on the following themes: Evolution of molecules in vitro selection of variants with improved activity, molecular interaction studies aiming to plant pest resistance to insects.
Ludvik Gomulski
Department of Biology and Biotechnology
University of Pavia
Pavia PV Italy
gomulski@unipv.it
Genetics and genomics of insects of economic and medical importance
We are using transcriptome data to analyze the molecular changes that accompany major physiological and behavioral changes such as maturation and mating in different insect species of medical and agricultural importance. We are particularly interested in transcriptional changes in olfactory related genes.
Dimitrios Kontogiannatos
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology Department
Agricultural University of Athens
Athens Attika Greece
dim_kontogiannatos@yahoo.gr

I am studying the use of RNAi technology in several aspects of Insect Science, like functional genomics, endocrinology and pest management (Baculovirus, bacterial-mediated dsRNA delivery and direct transfer of dsRNAs) in the Lepidopteran species Sesamia nonagrioides.  I am also working with insect cell lines and baculovirus technology in order to express and biochemically characterize important developmental genes of several insect pests. 
Jie Hung, Patricia King
Dr.
Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Universiti Putra Malaysia
Bintulu, Sarawak Not Applicable Malaysia
patriciaking1127@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
Termite digestome: unravelling its enzymes repertoires and secondary metabolites through metatranscriptomes and proteomic analysis; and investigate its gut microbiota using metagenomics approach
Guido Favia
Professor
CV
School of Biosciences and Veterinary Medicine
University of Camerino
Camerino Macerata Italy
guido.favia@unicam.it
Molecular Parasitology
Recent advances in the knowledge of anophelines biology make possible new strategies to control malaria by genetically modifying the mosquito to reduce its vectorial competence. However, one crucial aspect of this approach is how to introduce into wild mosquito populations the appropriate effector transgenes, which are able to interfere with parasite development. We will explore an alternative method to introduce effector genes into mosquitoes, via the microbiota hosted in its midgut lumen, i.e. rather than by genetically modifying mosquitoes, by modifying bacteria that inhabit the mosquito midgut. We have recently identified bacteria (Asaia) and yeasts (Pichia), inhabiting the midgut and
Omogo Collins
Mr.
CV
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
International Centre For Insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Kenya Kenya
graomogo@yahoo.com
Icipe-Molecular Biology and Bioinformatics Unit
My career goal is to be an investigator in tropical medicine, focusing in research on the control of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), and emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), with focus on the identification and validation of novel drug targets for chemotherapeutic control.
Jonas Schwirz
Project Group Bioresources
Fraunhofer IME
Giessen Hessen Germany
jonas.schwirz@ime.fraunhofer.de

Drosophila genetics and transgenesis
Frank Criscione
Entomology
University of Maryland
Rockville MD USA
fcris@umd.edu

Enhancer trap technologies and mosquito hematology.
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Omar Akbari
Postdoctoral Scholar
Biological Engineering
Caltech
Pasadena CA USA
oakbari@caltech.edu
Bruce Hay Lab
My research focuses on developing innovative population replacement methods for manipulating the composition and/or fate of the wild mosquito vector populations in ways that are catalytic: by introducing relatively small numbers of individuals into natural populations, resulting in effects that increase over time and in space, and that are self-sustaining. These approaches utilize synthetically engineered selfish genetic elements designed to rapidly spread themselves with linked cargo genes into wild populations.
Alimorad Sarafrazi
Dr
CV
Insect Taxonomy Research Department
Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection
Tehran Tehran/Asia Iran
asarafrazi@yahoo.com
Heteroptera
I'm working on the taxoxnomy of Heteroptera based on morphological and molecular characters. I have also working on the population Genetics of these taxa. Recently I have conducted some works on phyloclimatics of Heteroptera combining the genetic structure and distribution modeling
Carolyn McBride
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ USA
lmcbride@rockefeller.edu

The molecular, neural, and evolutionary basis of insect behavior
Ada Rafaeli
Associate Director , Prof.
Academic Affairs and International Cooperation
Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center
Bet Dagan NONE ISRAEL
vtada@volcani.agri.gov.il
Insect Physiology Lab, Department of food quality and safety
Physiological, biochemical and molecular regulatory mechanisms of insect reproductive behavior, particularly in lepidopterans
Lucy Firth
Dr
Invertebrate Genetics
Syngenta
Bracknell Berkshire UK
lucy.firth@syngenta.com
Dr. Lucy C. Firth
Drosophila genetic technologies to uncover and understand insecticidal mode of action targets and resistance. Comparative genomics of agronomic pest species.
Karen Barandoc-Alviar
Research Associate
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kbalviar@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research focuses on virus-vector interaction and we use the emerging model system, Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper and Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV). Our goal is to identify vector molecules that respond to virus infection and how changes in vector physiology and behavior affect efficiency of transmission to host plants.
Leonard Rabinow
professor
Biology
Univ. Paris Sud
Orsay none France
leonard.rabinow@u-psud.fr

Regulation of sex determination, apoptosis, and signal transduction via phosphorylation by LAMMER protein kinases
Sara Oppenheim
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
American Museum of Natural History
NY NY USA
saraoppenheim@gmail.com

The evolution of host plant use and diet breadth in specialists and generalists.
Paul Linser
Professor of Cell Biology
Whitney Laboratory
University of Florida
Saint Augustine Florida USA
pjl@whitney.ufl.edu
Linser Lab
Cell biology of a number of organismal systems. In regard to mosquitoes, my group has focused on epithelial physiology and cell biology as it impacts alimentary canal function. Tools we use include transcriptomics, electrophysiology, advanced imaging (light microscopy), general molecular biology.
Emilie Pondeville
Dr
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
Glasgow Glasgow Scotland, UK
emilie.pondeville@glasgow.ac.uk

Reproduction and immunity in mosquito vectors using genetic tools
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
Joanna Chiu
Assistant Professor
Entomology and Nematology
UC Davis
Davis CA USA
jcchiu@ucdavis.edu

Circadian Biology, Proteomics, Phylogenomics
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Naomi Pierce
Hessel Professor of Biology
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
npierce@oeb.harvard.edu
Pierce lab
Research in the Pierce lab focuses on the behavioral ecology of insect interactions, including mutualisms between social insects and other species, microbiota/ host associations, and insect/plant coevolution. We’ve used molecular characters to reconstruct the evolutionary history of a range of insects (mostly ants, bees, butterflies and moths), and comparative methods to study adaptation and life history evolution, biogeography, rates of diversification and patterns of community assembly. At a functional level, we are also exploring proximate mechanisms underlying trade-offs in a model genetic plant–pathogen–insect system, as well as the interplay of genetics and the environment in the evolution of social behavior
Daniel Sonenshine
Professor (Emeritus)
Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk Virginia United States
dsonensh@odu.edu
Tick Lab
Neurobiology of ticks; transcriptomics; neuropeptides, neurotransmitters; tick-borne pathogens; innate immunity; pheromones.
Don Jarvis
Professor
Molecular Biology
University of Wyoming
Laramie WY USA
dljarvis@uwyo.edu

Insect glycobiology with a focus on elucidation and genetic manipulation of pathways of glycoprotein biosynthesis. Developing novel/improved baculovirus-insect cell/insect expression systems.
Fiona Mumoki
PhD Student
Zoology and Entomology Department, Social Insect Research Group
University of Pretoria
Hatfield, Pretoria Gauteng South Africa
nelimafiona@yahoo.com

I am interested in chemical communication in honeybee reproductive dominance
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Gene Robinson
Swanlund Chair of Entomology
Department of Entomology and Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana IL USA
generobi@illinois.edu
Robinson Lab
Robinson uses genomics and systems biology to study the mechanisms and evolution of social life. His principal model system is the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, along with other species of bees. The goal is to explain the function and evolution of behavioral mechanisms that integrate the activity of individuals in a society, neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate behavior within the brain of the individual, and the genes that influence social behavior. Research focuses on division of labor, aggression, and the famous dance language, a system of symbolic communication. Current projects include: 1) nutritional regulation of brain gene expression
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
cmerlin@bio.tamu.edu
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Alexandra Wilson
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
acwilson@bio.miami.edu
Wilson Group
The Wilson Group's research focuses on the symbiosis of sap-feeding insects with their obligate intracellular bacterial symbionts. Working within an evolutionary framework they use protein expression systems and immunolocalization to functionally characterize amino acid transporters at the symbiotic interface of sap-feeding insects.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Dr. Rakesh Mishra
CV
CCMB
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad Telangana India
mishra@ccmb.res.in
Senior Principal Scientist and Group Leader
We are interested in understanding how non-coding part of the genome, including repetitive sequences, brings about cell type specific is packaging and how once this packaging established it is maintained by epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms. We use Hox gene complexes as loci in model systems, Drosophila and zebrafish, to address theses issues address evolution of complexity in animals. By analyzing the genome organization in the context of nuclear architecture we study the structural basis of cellular memory. We propose that embryonic development is setting up of functional form of genome (epigenome or cell type specific chromatin) starting from the stem cell
Ting Li
Research Associate
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Auburn University
Auburn AL USA
tzl0001@auburn.edu

Different mechanisms of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes.
Badrul Arefin
Molecular Biosciences
Stockholm University
Stockholm   Sweden
badrul.arefin@su.se
Ulrich Theopold
I am interested in to understand the molecular and the cellular mechanisms involved in the response against nematode infections in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am working on insect immunity, particularly Drosophila immunity towards entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN). Until now, our knowledge on Drosophila immunity mostly comes from studies of bacterial and fungal infections. However, nematode parasites are considered one the biggest threats to human health, causing diseases leading to death. Even when they are not killing, they could stay in the host and cause chronic diseases. Lymphatic filariasis is such an example which is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti (filarial nematode).
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón
VectorBase Scientific Liaison/Outreach Manager
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
ggiraldo@nd.edu
VectorBase
I teach scientist at all career stages, students, postdocs, technicians, researchers, and faculty, how to use VectorBase data, tools and resources. I also teach how to manually annotate genes to submit them in VectorBase, we currently use Artemis but will soon host WebApollo too. Our developers are currently working on VectorBase Galaxy, soon will be teaching how to use it too.
Dominic Esposito
Director
Protein Expression Laboratory
Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research
Frederick MD USA
dom.esposito@fnlcr.nih.gov
Protein Expression Laboratory
Generation of recombinant DNA and proteins in support of the National Cancer Institute's RAS initiative.
Josephine Reinhardt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Biology
University of Maryland College Park
College Park MD USA
reinharj@umd.edu
http://igtrcn.org/participant/gerald-wilkinson/
I am currently studying several aspects of the genomics of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), which are best known as a model for sexual selection and meiotic drive. Recently, it was also discovered the T. dalmanni have a sex chromosome distinct from both the ancestral X and the X in Drosophila, making them an interesting comparative model for aspects of sex-chromosome evolution. We recently released a transcriptome assembly as part of an analysis that identified genes that are differentially regulated in males carrying a driving sex chromosome. We are currently assembling and annotating the T. dalmanni genome.
LEI LIU
Associate Research Scientist
Infectious Diseases
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
lei.liu.ll69@yale.edu

My works are focus on seeking solutions to the problem of arthropod-borne infectious diseases and advancing our molecular understanding of how these pathogens infect their vectors and is therefore a critical step forward in our development of new approaches to control the prevalence of infected vectors.
Dayalan Srinivasan
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Rowan University
Glassboro NJ USA
srinivasan@rowan.edu

We use the pea aphid, an insect that displays several polyphenisms, as our model for understanding the genetic, epigenetic cellular basis of phenotypic plasticity as well as its evolution.
Paul Shirk
Research Physiologist
CV
Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit
USDA-ARS CMAVE
Gainesville Florida USA
paul.shirk@ars.usda.gov
Shirk Lab
The Shirk lab is currently creating the genetic and microbiological tools necessary to genetically transform obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria particularly Wolbachia. This requires modification and application of transgenic systems utilized in transgenesis of insects. We are also collaborating with other labs to achieve somatic and germline transformation of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, the varroa mite, Varroa destructor, and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella employing piggyBac vectors.
Prof. Dr. Ernst A. Wimmer
CV
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August University Goettingen
Goettingen Lower Saxony Germany
ewimmer@gwdg.de
Developmental Biology and Insect Biotechnology
The research in the department of developmental biology covers a variety of developmental and physiological processes (e.g. head development, brain development, limb development, segmentation, germ cell differentiation, development and function of stink glands, as well as olfaction), their molecular basis, and their evolutionary conservation or diversification. In addition, novel approaches to insect pest management are developed using developmental genes and molecular biology tools. The animal model systems used at the department include a series of arthropods: insects, crustaceans, spiders.
Dr. Emmanuelle Jacquin-Joly
CV
EcoSens department iEES-Paris
INRA
Versailles cedex Yveline France
emmanuelle.jacquin@versailles.inra.fr
Institute of Ecology and Environmental Sciences
My research focuses on insect chemoreception in a context of plant protection. My objectives are 1) to decipher the molecular mechanisms of olfaction and taste, focusing on chemosensory receptors, 2) to study the contribution of chemoreception to insect adaptation to new hosts and anthropic systems, 3) to investigate the evolutionary origin of insect chemosensory receptors. I am using an integrative approach from genes to behaviour, including genomics and transcriptomics approaches.
Frederique Hilliou
Santé des Plantes et Environnement
INRA
Sophia Antipolis cedex alpes maritimes FRANCE
hilliou@sophia.inra.fr
Institut Sopha Agrobiotech
The team I am working with at INRA of Sophia Antipolis, France, is involved in studying the mechanistic bases and evolution of insect traits essential to adapt to the biotic and abiotic environment. My main project has been developed to decipher the way Lepidoptera adapt to chemically adverse environments (using genomic approaches, and through the prism of the CYP genes and P450 enzymes they encode). We have focused on adaptation of the polyphagous noctuid pest S. frugiperda. We have developed an oligonucleotide microarray covering almost 10,000 genes from this species and contributed to the sequence of ESTs. Transcriptomic results show
Mr. Shreeharsha Tarikere
Biology
IISER Pune
pune maharashtra india
harsha_tts1@yahoo.co.uk

Wing development in insects with focus on lepidoptera
Peter Atkinson
Professor
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
peter.atkinson@ucr.edu
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
Arnaud Martin
Post-Doctoral Research Assistant
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California Berkley
BERKELEY CA USA
heliconiuswing@gmail.com
Evolution and Development of butterflies and moths
I am a developmental biologist who specializes in evolutionary studies of the genotype-phenotype map, in particular in non-model organisms of ecological interest. I am particularly interested in the generative mechanisms of evolutionary change and use a combination of comparative, genomic and developmental tools in lepidopterans to tackle how the genetic properties of living systems generate variation and biodiversity.
LJ Zwiebel
Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Vanderbilt University/Medical Center
Nashville TN USA
l.zwiebel@vanderbilt.edu
LJZlab
We are examining the molecular events of olfaction as this sensory modality predominates most of the relevant behaviors in ants as well as host preference and several other behaviors in mosquitoes to thereby make significant impact to vectorial capacity. Working together with several outstanding collaborators here at Vanderbilt and around the world, we are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which insects transduce chemical signals from their environment into neuronal activity and ultimately behavior. Within Anopheles, we focus specifically on the genetic basis for anthropophily- the characteristic preference for human biting that significantly drives malaria transmission by An. gambiae.
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA
adingwall@luc.edu

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Judith Willis
Professor Emerita
Cellular Biology
University of Georgia
Athens GA USA
jhwillis@uga.edu

We study the structural cuticular proteins of Anopheles gambiae. Anopheles devotes about 2% of all its protein coding gens these proteins. We have annotated the genes, established the presence of the corresponding proteins in the cuticle with LC-MS/MS analyses. We have published expression patterns for most throughout development. Others have implicated some in insecticide resistance and in the difference between M (now An. coluzzii) and S forms. We have used in situ hybridization to learn where the genes are expressed and immunolocalization on EM sections to learn where in the cuticle the proteins are localized.
Gregory Davis
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
Bryn Mawr College
Bryn Mawr PA USA
gdavis@brynmawr.edu
G Davis Lab at Bryn Mawr College
At Bryn Mawr College my undergraduate students and I study environmentally cued, discrete, alternate phenotypes exhibited by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. The remarkable developmental plasticity of this insect presents an opportunity to examine divergent developmental processes that are somehow directed by a single genome and cued by the environment. Our focus is the reproductive polyphenism, in which differences in day length determine whether mothers will produce daughters that reproduce either sexually by laying fertilized eggs, or asexually by allowing oocytes to complete embryogenesis within the mother without fertilization. Oocytes and embryos that are produced asexually and develop within the
Haobo Jiang
Professor
CV
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
haobo.jiang@okstate.edu
Insect Molecular Biology Lab
1. Extracellular serine protease network in Manduca sexta; 2. Prophenoloxidase structure, function, activation, and regulation by serpins; 3. Insect genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and microRNA studies; 4. Other aspects of insect immunity including pathogen recognition, signal transduction, antimicrobial effectors, cellular responses, and so on. ,
William Reid
Post Doctoral Associate
CV
Entomology
University of Maryland
IBBR
Rockville MD USA
wzr0005@tigermail.auburn.edu
O'Brochta lab
Working with forward genetic technologies in Anopheles stephensi
Kristina Pilitt
technician
O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland, College Park
Rockville MD USA
gene_queen76@hotmail.com
Faculty Research Assistant
Molecular genetic studies using piggBac transposon-based gene-, enhancer-, promoter-trapping system transformation vectors for creating transgenic Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. Genotype analysis and characterization of transgenic mosquito lines using molecular techniques such as splinkerette PCR, inverse PCR and gene expression studies using quantitative RT-PCR.
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Channa Aluvihare
Research Technician
technician
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland College Park at Shady Grove
Rockville MD USA
aluvihar@umd.edu
Insect Transformation Facility
Insect rearing for genetic modification, genetically modified organisms and gene delivery systems.
Dr. Christina Grozinger
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
College of Agricultural Sciences
University Park PA United States
cmgrozinger@psu.edu
Grozinger Lab
My program seamlessly integrates research, education, outreach and service related to the biology and health of honey bees and other pollinators.  My research addresses both basic and applied questions, using a highly trans-disciplinary approach encompassing genomics, physiology, neurobiology, behavior, and chemical ecology.  My program consists of two main areas of study, which examine the mechanisms underlying social behavior and health in honey bees and related species.  Our studies on social behavior seek to elucidate the proximate and ultimate mechanisms that regulate complex chemical communication systems in insect societies.  Our studies on honey bee health examine how biotic and abiotic stressors
Dr. Jennifer Brisson
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY United States
jbrisso3@bio.rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
genetic mapping and association mapping using Illumina data, as well as Illumina (RNA-Seq) studies; in situ hybridization of RNA to embryos, methyl-Seq
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
kmichel@ksu.edu
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.