Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
CHUN-QING ZHAO
Assocaite Professor
College of Plant Protection
Nanjing Agricultural University
Nanjing Jiangsu China
zcqcau@126.com

insect resistance, neurotransmitter receptor
Kostas Mathiopoulos
Professor, Department Chair
Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
kmathiop@bio.uth.gr

Molecular biology and genomics of economically important pests, particularly Tephritids. Focus on olfactory and reproductive systems. Study of the structure, function and evolution of the Y chromosome.
saptarshi ghosh
Department of Entomology
Volcani Center, Agriculture research organisation, Israel
Rishon Lezion Rishon Lezion Israel
sunnysaptarshi@gmail.com

Insect-vector interactions
Isabella Schember
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
ilschemb@buffalo.edu
Halfon Lab, PhD candidate
I am currently a PhD candidate and I am interested in studying gene regulatory network evolution and regulatory genomics of various insects.
Gonse Marius Zoh
PhD student, Medical entomogist CNRS
Department of biology
Université de Grenoble, France
Grenoble Rhones-Alpes FRANCE
zgonse@gmail.com
Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine (LECA)
Mechanisms involved in the resistance of Anopheles gambiae to a new formulation of the insecticidal fusion of pyrethroids and neonicotinoids
Courtney Clark-Hachtel
Doctoral Candidate
CV
Department of Biology
Miami Univerisity
Oxford OH United States
clarkcm6@miamioh.edu

Studying the evolutionary origin of the novel insect wing using various arthropods.
Ayman Ahmed
Mr
CV
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM)
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
zoologist05@gmail.com
Vector behaviour and genomics
Mosquito Population genetics and Mosquito-borne Viral Diseases.
Oliver Siehler
Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
oliver.siehler@gmx.de

Social and Neuroanatomical aspects of social entrainment
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Dylan Shropshire
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN United States
dylan.shropshire@vanderbilt.edu

Endosymbiont genetics
Roopa H.K
Researcher
CV
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
London harrow United Kingdom
roopa21hk@gmail.com

my research focus is mainly on Insect pests management. Implementing eco-friendly management programs like biocontrol, entamopathogens like fungi, bacteria. And also using advance technologies like gene regulation, CRISPR / cas9 system. Identifying insect self limiting genes in case of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci for its management and reduce vector potency to various crops.
jacinta chuang
Sr. reseatch scientist
biochemistry
ut southwestern med ctr
dallas tx usa
jacinta.chuang@utsouthwestern.edu

metabolic diseases
Ali Zachi
PhD candidate
Plant protection
University Putra Malaysia
Belakong Selangor  Malaysia
alizagi74@gmail.com
Toxicology
Entomopathogenic fungi,bio insecticides,formulation of intomopathogenic fungi
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Karthikeyan Ramiaah
Biological Sciences and Bio Engineering
Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur
Kanpur Uttarpradesh India
krthkyn@iitk.ac.in
Brain Lab
I will be focussing on using latest genetic engineering tools to edit the genes that code for olfactory receptors. Especially CRISPR cas9 mediated genome editing.
Johan Ariff Mohtar
Mr
CV
Department of Chemical Engineering Technology (Industrial Biotechnology)
Universiti Malaysia Perlis
Kampus UniCiti Alam, Sungai Chuchuh, Padang Besar Perlis Malaysia
joarach82@gmail.com
Tissue Culture and Biomolecular Laboratory
For the past two years, I have been engaging in the spider silk research for tissue engineering application. Spider silk gland from the basal lineage of spider species provides a promising platform as a potential bioreactor for recombinant protein production. I am pursuing a PhD study in the effort of developing transgenic social spiders for such purpose
SALMAN KHAN
PhD RESEARCH SCHOLAR
FOREST ENTOMOLOGY DIVISION
FOREST RESEARCH INSTITUTE DEHRADUN
DEHRADUN UTTARAKHAND INDIA
salman1315@gmail.com

BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF FOREST INSECT PESTS; TAXONOMY OF MICRO-HYMENOPTERA; MORPHOMETRICS OF INSECTS; IDENTIFICATION OF NATURAL ENEMY OF FOREST TREES
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
Ibrahim Elsheshney
Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Economic Entomology
Plant Protection (Economic Entomology)
Tanta University, Egypt
Tanta Gharbeya Egypt
ishento@yahoo.com

• Investigating innovative methods of insect pest control such as CRISPR, RNAi, Bt … etc. • Studying insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry in -omics levels. • Exploring insect resistance, immunological and development. • Understanding Ecological and multi-trophic interactions (plant-pathogen-insect-symbionts-natural enemies) in the ecosystem and microbial Ecology of insects. • IPM and Biological control of Horticulture and vegetable Insect Pests • Nanotechnology applications in pest control
Silvia Lanzavecchia
Doctor in Science
CV
Genetics Institute
National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA)
HURLINGHAM BUENOS AIRES ARGENTINA
lanzavecchia.silvia@inta.gob.ar
LABORATORIO DE GENETICA DE INSECTOS DE IMPORTANCIA ECONÓMICA
Our scientific lines of research are focused on insect genetics, population genetics, application of molecular markers and the study of genes involved in physiological and behavioral processes. Our activities are associated to the development of environmentally-friendly control strategies against the most economically important insect pests and molecular characterization of beneficial insects.
Narender Dhania
M.Sc.
CV
Department of Animal Biology
School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad
Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh India
warlock.naren@gmail.com

Assessment of midgut regeneration in lepidopteran larvae upon Cry toxin intoxication.
JAINDER CHHILAR
Dr
BIOLOGY
NEW MEXICO STATE UNIVERSITY
LAS CRUCES NEW MEXICO USA
jainder@gmail.com
MOSQUITO GENOMICS
My current focus is on the Anopheles mosquito immunity in context with the gut microbiome and the role of gut microbiota in priming the immune response
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Abhijit Ghosal
Dr.
Plant Protection
Sasya Shyamala Farm Science Centre
SOUTH 24 PARGANAS WEST BENGAL India
ghosalabhijit87@gmail.com

Agricultural Entomology Insect Biotechnology
Alexis Hill
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis MO USA
alexis.s.hill@wustl.edu

Genes and behavior
MUJEEB OLUSHOLA SHITTU
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Michigan Technological University
HOUGHTON Michigan United States
mshittu@mtu.edu
Werner's Lab
Studying the evolution and development of complex colour patterns in Drosophila guttifera
Daniel Hasegawa
Research Molecular Biologist
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
Charleston SC USA
daniel.k.hasegawa@gmail.com

I am broadly interested in understanding the molecular and physiological processes that drive insect-virus relationships. I have joined the IGTRCN because I am interested in utilizing gene editing technologies to: 1) further understand insect-virus relationships that have agricultural importance; 2) develop translational tools for more effective and precise insect pest management practices.
Pratima Chennuri
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX USA
pratima.chennuri@live.co.uk

Gene Drives.
Gajalakshmi Muthu
CV
of Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
Bangalore  karanataka India
gajalakshmiagri@gmail.com

Molecular Entomology, Insecticide Resistance, Taxonomy
G Sharath Chandra
PDF
CV
Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
sharathgsc@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
RNA interference (RNAi) mediated management of Insect pests; Development of Transgenic plants for pest resistance, drought tolerance; Nutritional quality improvement.
Anna Buchman
Project Scientist
Department of Entomology
UC Riverside
Riverside CA USA
annabuch@ucr.edu
Akbari Lab
I am currently working to develop replacement and suppression gene drive systems in fruit flies and mosquitoes.
Pinky Kain Sharma
Principal investigator (Wellcome Trust DBT intermediate Fellow)
Department of Genetics and Neurobiology
Regional Centre for Biotechnology, Faridabad, India
Faridabad Haryana India
pinkykain@gmail.com
Laboratory of Genetics and Neurobiology
For any animal, learning about food is an important mechanism that provide animals flexibility in food choices for better survival, hence, it is extremely important to understand how the taste information is represented in the brain.I am interested in understanding how insects make the feeding decisions. This involves identifying neuronal taste circuits in the brain downstream of gustatory sensory neurons that influence feeding behaviors. Physiological state and other factors can act on the gustatory cells and circuits and can modulate taste signals, but these are not well understood in insects. Using Drosophila melanogaster, I will explore into these mechanisms for greater understanding
Rubina Chongtham
Botany
University of Delhi
Delhi Delhi India
chrubina1@yahoo.co.in

Aphids are important crop pests. Understanding plant-aphid interactions can give great insights into not only aphid biology, but also methods of crop-protection. My focus is on using transcriptomics and functional genomics in order to develop improved plant variety using RNAi.
Nahid Borhani Dizaji
Post doc fellow
molecular microbiology and immunology
Johns Hopkins University , School of public health
Baltimore MD United States
nborhan1@jhu.edu

my focus interest is on different aspects of vector biology like mosquito-pathogen interactions and dissection of mosquito immunity to Plasmodium and dengue virus infection with emphasis on developing novel strategies against mosquito born disease vectors. As a current post doc fellow I am working on generating of transgenic mosquitoes.
Sarah Hamm
Biosciences
University of Exeter
Penryn Cornwall UK
sh580@exeter.ac.uk

Investigating the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua
Arvind Sharma
Post-Doctoral Associate
CV
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
reno NEVADA US
arvindsharma.phd@gmail.com

My research is focused on understanding questions related to vector ecology and use of the novel techniques to modify the genome of Ixodes scapularis
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Rakesh Joshi
Assistant Professor
CV
Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology
Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune)
Pune Maharashtra India
rakeshjoshi687@gmail.com
Insect Biology Lab
Our group mainly deals with exploring new targets in agricultural pest and developing their blockers, which can be further applied for crop protection.
pradeep bhongale
AGROCHEMICALS AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY. KOLHAPUR
KOLHAPUR MAHARASTRA INDIA
pradeepbhongale1993@gmail.com

DNA BARCODING FOR PEST IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT
Lewis Hun
Lewis Hun M.S
CV
Entomology and Insect Science
University of Arizona
Tucson AZ United States
Lewisvibulhun@email.arizona.edu
The Riehle Lab
I'm interested in new strategies for controlling mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit. Malaria is one of the leading causes of death from infectious diseases worldwide. The mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi is a major vector of the causative Plasmodium agents in India. Due to emerging challenges such as drug resistance in Plasmodium and insecticide resistance in the mosquito, there is an increasing need for novel malaria control strategies. Malaria parasites must develop for up to two weeks in the mosquito, and conceptually, this development can be disrupted by enhancing mosquito innate immunity or by shortening the mosquito's lifespan. The insulin/IGF-1 signaling
sanket deshmukh
AGROCHEMICAL AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY
nagpur maharstra india
sssanketdeshmukh@gmail.com

insilico study for pest managment
Julia Ulrich
Dpt. Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
julrich@gwdg.de

RNAi based pest control
kanakala surapathrudu
post doctoral Research fellow
Department of Entomology
Agricultural Research Organization
Bet Dagan, Israel. Israel Israel
kanakalavit@gmail.com

RNAi
Andrew Hammond
Research Associate
Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London Greater London United Kingdom
andrew.hammond08@imperial.ac.uk
Crisanti Lab
Gene drives in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae
mona jahani
Ghent University
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
monajahani@gmail.com

Using RNAi technique for investigating the functional genomics and its efficiency for controlling insects
Jeff Demuth
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington Texas United States
jpdemuth@uta.edu
Demuth Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics. Speciation. Sex chromosome evolution. Gene family evolution. Sexual selection.
Vakil Ahmad
Dr.
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia Missouri USA
v.ahmad@outlook.com
Zhang Bing Laboratory
I am focused on the role of glial cells in Drosophila sleep behavior through Neurogenetics. In order to decipher the role of glial cells in fruit fly behaviors such as locomotion and sleep, and to gain an insight into glia-neural interaction underlying regulatory mechanisms for these behaviors, we use a “cell-centric” forward genetic approach to identify the subset glia through studying sleep behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. We hypothesize that specific glial cells are crucial for various sleep characteristics by modulating the functionality of specific neurons. We genetically manipulate subset glia within a broad glial-specific repo-Gal4 expression pattern using the FINGR (Flippase-induced
Rafael Homem
Biological Chemistry and Crop Protection Department
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden England United Kingdom
rafael.homem@rothamsted.ac.uk

Insecticide resistance
Allison Hansen
Department of Entomology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois United States
akh@illinois.edu
Hansen Lab
The main focus of my research laboratory is to investigate host-symbiont interactions between sap-sucking insects (e.g., psyllids, whiteflies, scale insects) and their ancient obligate bacterial symbionts, because of their highly co-evolved and shared amino acid metabolisms. Due to genome-enabled sequencing technology, the regulation of this co-evolved amino-acid symbiosis is an emerging area of research in these unculturable microbe-insect systems.
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Linda Kothera
Microbiologist
Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Fort Collins CO US
lkothera@cdc.gov

Genetic changes associated with insecticide resistance in vector mosquitoes.
Tofazzal Hossain Howlader
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Bangladesh Agricultural University
Mymensingh Mymensingh Bangladesh
tofazzalh@gmail.com

Bacillus thuringiensis, Entomopathogenic fungi
Juan Hurtado
Ecology, Genetics and Evolution
IEGEBA - University of Buenos Aires
C.A. Buenos Aires C.A. Buenos Aires Argentina
hurtado.juanp@gmail.com

Reproductive Biology and Evolution
Meredith Hawley
Research and Development Specialist
Pest Screening
Bayer NA - CropScience Division
Morrisville North Carolina United States of America
meredith.hawley@bayer.com
Research and Development Specialist
Investigating potential traits providing pest resistance in agricultural crops of interest
Mohammad Haddadi
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
University of Zabol
Zabol Sistan and Baluchestan Iran
hadadimohamad@gmail.com
Molecular Neurobiology
Aging and neuronal dysfunction.
Dan Hahn
Associate Professor
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville FL USA
dahahn@ufl.edu

ecological and evolutionary physiology, physiological and genetic architecture of adaptation, applications of stress biology to biological control
Wendy Smith
Associate Professor and Interim Chair
Biology
Northeastern University
Boston MA USA
w.smith@neu.edu

Regulation of insect growth, development, and immunity
Kumaresan Ramanathan
Associate Professor
CV
Biochemistry Unit,Institute of Biomedical Science,College of Health Sciences
Mekelle University (Ayder Campus)
Mekelle Tigray Region Ethiopia
kumaresanramanatha@gmail.com
Biomarkers Research Lab
1. Study on Regulation of Low Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Metabolism using PCSK9 Gene Silencing Initially we have done this study in computational approach and the results were quite interesting. Background & Aim: With nearly 32.4 million people are affected every year with Myocardial infarction (MI), Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) and strokes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to abnormal lipid metabolism. Combating and preventing abnormality in lipid metabolism becomes a pivotal criteria for research. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulating protein, it promotes the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptors (LDL-R) and hence increases LDL-C levels. Mutations that block the
Elisabeth Marchal
Biology - research group of Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
KU Leuven
Leuven Vl-Brabant Belgium
elisabeth.marchal@bio.kuleuven.be

Regulation of lipophilic hormone biosynthesis, ecdysteroids, juvenile hormones. Signal transduction of JH, 20E, cross-talk and interaction with insulin like peptides. Neuropeptides and their GPCRs.
Zeeshan Shaukat
Dr
CV
Genetics and Evolution
University of Adelaide
Adelaide South Australia Australia
zeeshan.shaukat@adelaide.edu.au
Gregory Lab
Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. As CIN is not found in normal cells, it offers a cancer-specific target for therapy. We generated a CIN model in Drosophila by knocking down the spindle checkpoint, and screened for candidate knockdowns that induce apoptosis only in CIN cells. Genes identified include those involved in the DNA damage/repair pathway, JNK signaling pathway, mitotic cytoskeletal regulation and metabolism. The screen demonstrates that it is feasible to selectively kill cells with CIN. CIN is linked to the
Mohammad Asaduzzaman Miah
PhD Scholar
CV
Insect Molecular Biology, College of Plant Protection
Nanjing Agricultural University
Nanjing Jiangsu China
2014202051@njau.edu.cn
Insect Physiology and Molecular Biology
Molecular mechanism of Insecticide resistance, Functional expression (invitro) of metabolic (detoxification) enzymes ( the genes of CYP450 families) which responsible for insecticide resistance as well as to find out the activities of metabolites (Chemicals/insecticides) in insect body.
Linlin Zhang
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University
ithaca New York United States
gemzhanglinlin@gmail.com
Reed Lab
butterfly color pattern mechanism and evolution
SONAI RAJAN THANGARAJ
Dr
Agricultural Entomology
Tamil Nadu Agriculture University
Coimbatore  Tamil Nadu  India
snraja_insect@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Ecology Lab, Department of Plant Biotechnology, Centre for Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Population genetics of stored grain insect pests and honey bees Transcriptome Analaysis
Ewan Richardson
Mr
Biochemistry and Crop Protection
Rothamsted
Brighton Sussex United Kingdom
ewan.richardson@rothamsted.ac.uk

I study the mutations underlying resistance to Diamide insecticides amongst moths. Much of my work revolves around structural study of the Ryanodine Receptor, a calcium channel of major importance in all animals. I use transgenesis to explore the impact of Ryanodine Receptor mutations on pesticide resistance in moths, and to determine whether the same effects can be established in other insect orders.
Erica Lindroth
Testing and Evaluation
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
Jacksonville Florida USA
erica.j.lindroth.mil@mail.mil

My research focuses on the development and evaluation of vector control technology for military use.
Vanessa Corby-Harris
Research Physiologist
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center
USDA-ARS
Tucson AZ USA
vanessa.corby@ars.usda.gov
Corby-Harris Lab
Our goal is to increase honey bee health through improved nutrition.
Keith Hopper
Dr.
CV
Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Newark DE USA
khopper@udel.edu
USDA-ARS-Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit
The central theme of my research is to determine the mechanisms affecting host specificity of parasitic and herbivorous insects. My lab is testing alternative hypotheses about the genetic architecture of specificity: many genes interacting epistatically versus few genes interacting additively. Evolutionary shifts are much less likely under the first hypothesis than under the second. We are studing the genomics and transcriptomics of differences in host specificity among insect species.
Duverney Chaverra Rodriguez
PhD Candidate
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
State College Pennsylvania United States
ddc172@psu.edu
Jason Rasgon Lab
My research focuses in exploring and optimizing strategies to produce transgenic insects via maternal injection.
Karan Singh
PhD Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali
Mohali Punjab India
karansinghlabana1984@gmail.com
Evolutionary Biology Lab
My broad area of research interest is evolutionary genetics and host-parasite interaction. My graduate work is mainly focused on how environmental stress shapes life history traits and underlying genetic mechanisms of increased cold stress resistance. Apart from my work on cold shock resistance, I have also focused on host-parasite interaction and I isolated a novel bacterial pathogen (Staphylococcus succinus) of D. melanogaster that is now being extensively used to study evolutionary ecology of immunity.
Joshua Fisher
Invasive Species Biologist
Ecological Services
US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior
Honolulu Hawaii US
joshua_fisher@fws.gov

Vector Control, Avian Malaria
Amanda Choo
Postdoctoral researcher
Genetics & Evolution
University of Adelaide
Adelaide South Australia Australia
amanda.choo@adelaide.edu.au

Temperature sensitivity, genome manipulation technologies
Lorna Cohen
PhD Candidate
Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
cohen36@uic.edu
Lynch Lab
I am currently researching the genetic basis of head development in the parasitiod wasp, Nasonia. We aim to elucidate how specific morphologies are encoded in the genome, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate size and shape.
Johannes Schinko
Dr. rer. nat.
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhone-Alpes France
johannesschinko@hotmail.com

Genetic interactions during posterior elongation in short germ band insects.
Yizhou Chen
Senior Research Scientist
NSW Department of Primary Industries
Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute
Menangle NSW Australia
yizhou.chen@dpi.nsw.gov.au

genetics of insecticide resistance
Tetsuro Shinoda
Division of Insect Sciences
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
shinoda@affrc.go.jp

Molecular mechanisms of juvenile hormone action
Sandra Rehan
Assistant Professor of Genome Enabled Biology
Biological Sciences
University of New Hampshire
Durham New Hampshire USA
sandra.rehan@unh.edu
UNH Bee Lab
My research focus is social evolution and genetics. I have a special interest in the origin and evolution of social behavior in bees. The lab has three main foci: molecular phylogeny, behavioral ecology and comparative genomics. We employ these three levels of biological integration to study social complexity at multiple evolutionary scales.
Qian Han
Professor
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences
Hainan University
Haikou Hainan China
qian_han@yahoo.com
Tropical Veterinary Medicine and Vector Biology
My research interests are in tropical veterinary medicine and vector biology, particularly biology of mosquitoes and epidemiology of vector-borne animal diseases in Hainan Island of China.
Maria-Dolors Piulachs
Research Scientist at CSIC
Functional Genomics and Evolution
Institut de Biologia Evolutiva (CSIC-Universitat Pompeu Fabra)
Barcelona APO/FPO EUROPE / ATLANTIC Spain
mdolors.piulachs@ibe.upf-csic.es
Insect reproduction Lab.
Our long term objective is to elucidate how the oogenesis in insects is regulated, considering the structural diversity of ovary types and their respective evolutionary history.
Lyubov Yarinich
Laboratory of cell division
Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology
Novosibirsk Novosibirskaya oblast Russian Federation
l.yarinich@mcb.nsc.ru

Drosophila cell lines
Takashi Kiuchi
Assistant Professor
Department of Agricultural and Environmental Biology
Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, The University of Tokyo
Bunkyo-ku Tokyo Japan
kiuchi@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp
Laboratory of Insect Genetics and Bioscience
Sex determination, Diapause, Host plant preference
Tabashir Chowdhury
PhD candidate
CV
Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario Canada
tabashir@gmail.com

Genetic basis of behavioural isolation and speciation in Drosophila
Heather Hines
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology, Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
hmh19@psu.edu
Hines Lab
My lab examines the evolution of adaptive trait variation, focusing heavily on the evolution of mimetic patterning. We are pushing a new system for evolutionary genetics and evo-devo in discovery of the genes that are driving the radiation in coloration, largely as a result of mimicry, in the bumble bees. We utilize more descriptive analytical chemsitry, developmental and systematic approaches, and combine these with genomic and transcriptomic approaches to target candidate genes for mimicry and better understand the evolution of this adaptive diversification. Once these genes are targeted we can gain a better understanding of how these novel phenotypes evolved,
Christopher Cunningham
Ph.D.
Department of Genetics
University of Georgia, Athens
Athens GA USA
cbc83@uga.edu
Moore Laboratory
My research focuses on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, such as social dominance networks and parent-offspring interactions. My current model system is Nicrophorus vespilloides, a burying beetle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicrophorus_vespilloides). I am particularly interested in the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in these behaviors and their natural variation. I use many techniques to answer my questions of interest; including, bioinformatics, gene expression, and proteomic tools.
Kanapathy Gajapathy
Dr
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northernprovince Sri Lanka
gayan156@gmail.com
zoology laboratory; molecular biology laboratory in University of jaffna
Focusing on evolution and phylogeny of arthropods; specifically spiders and vector species among insects
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Santosh sarathy
molecular entomology
NBAIR
Bangalore Karnataka India
santoshsarathy@gmail.com

Expression profiling for insecticide resistance
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Zhenqing Chen
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois USA
zqchen@illinois.edu

The social behavior of Honeybee
RANIA ABD EL-WAHAB
Assistant Professor
CV
Mites of Cotton and Field Crops
PLANT PROTECTION RESEARCH INSTITUTE
MANSOURA MANSOURA EGYPT
rania-proline@hotmail.com

NANOTECHNOLOGY,LIGHT EMITTING DIODES EFFECTS,PREDATION ON MITES
Justin Overcash
Graduate Research Assistant
Genetics
Texas A&M
College Station Texas USA
justmo1@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
DNA double stranded break repair, manipulation of the classical non-homologous end joining pathway to achieved desired gene editing, gene drive mechanisms in Aedes aegypti & CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing techniques
Mahadeva swamy H M
Dr.
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bengaluru Karnataka INDIA
clintonbio@gmail.com
Bio-Pesticide Lab
Integrated Pest management, Coleoptera and plant parasitic nematodes control, Bacillus thuringiensis, RNAi in insect pest management, Formulation of agrochemicals,
Mary Chaffee
Graduate Student
CV
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY USA
mary.chaffee@rochester.edu

My research is focused on studying the molecular basis of the wing polyphenism is pea aphids.
Kimberly Stephens
Entomology
University of California - Riverside
Riverside California United States
kstep002@ucr.edu

Sperm motility and sperm-egg interactions
Yong Zhang
Assistant Professor
Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno NV U.S
yongzhang@unr.edu

Neurobiology, circadian clocks
Jason Hill
Zoologi
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
jason.hill@zoologi.su.se

Lepidopteran evolutionary genomics. Specifically butterfly adaptation in the wild.
Molly Shook
Postdoctoral Associate
Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois
Urbana Illinois United States
mshook@illinois.edu

Epigenetics of aggression in honey bees
Kimberly Johansson
Undergraduate Researcher
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
kimberly.johansson@gmail.com
Extavour Lab
im is an undergraduate in the class of 2015 at Harvard College, where she is concentrating in Chemical & Physical Biology. In the Extavour Lab, she works with Taro Nakamura studying primordial germ cell development in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus.
Raman Chandrasekar
Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
manhattan Kansas United States
biochandrus@yahoo.com
Research Associate
1. RNA Sequence analysis, Genomic and Proteomics appraoches 2. Study of insect proteins and enzymes will not only give valuable information on their unique biochemistry and physiology but will also identify novel tools for the development of new technologies and new ways to produce novel insect control measures. My main focus is will address the physiological and biochemical functions of proteins and enzymes in the insects’ life processes by using proteomics tools (i.e 2D PAGE, MS, MALDI-TOF, PMF), characterization of novel enzymes, qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their interactions on a genome scale,
BUWAH ZAKARIAH
Mr.
CV
CLINICAL LABORATORY- ENTOMOLOGY DEPARTMENT
KINTAMPO HEALTH RESEARCH CENTRE, GHANA
KINTAMPO, GHANA N/A GHANA
zakariah.buwah@kintampo-hrc.org
CLINICAL LABORATORY, KHRC
Kintampo Health Research Centre is a well-established, African-based, research centre which usually tries to solve public health issues. KHRC is one of three field research centres of the Health Research Unit of Ghana Health Service established in 1994. KHRC is situated in the middle belt of Ghana in the Brong Ahafo Region.
John Chaston
Assistant Professor
Genetics & Biotechnology
Brigham Young University
Provo UT USA
john_chaston@byu.edu

genetic basis for Drosophila-microbiota interactions
Laura Harrington
Professor
Department of Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
lch27@cornell.edu
Harrington lab
Research in the Harrington lab focuses on mosquito vector ecology, biology, and behavior. Our goal is to understand basic (and often overlooked) aspects of mosquito biology in order to identify new targets for controlling mosquitoes and reducing transmission of vector-borne diseases.
prof prem raj pushpakaran
professor
BioTechnology
NITC
calicut kerala india
drpremrajp@nitc.ac.in

immunology, bio-informatics
Robert Waterhouse
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
University of Geneva Medical School
Geneva Geneva Switzerland
robert.waterhouse@unige.ch
Computational Evolutionary Genomics Group
Evolutionary genomics of mosquitoes and other insects.
Jianwu Chen
Dr
Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA United States
jwchen97@yahoo.com

Mechanism of action of Bt toxins
Jingfei Huang
Dr.
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Plant Protection
Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
Fuzhou Fujian China
jfhuang@fafu.edu.cn

insect genome; insecticide resistance; programmed cell death
DEEPAK KUMAR SINHA
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology
M.M. University, India
AMBALA HARYANA INDIA
deepak22sinha@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Entomologist
I developed deep interest in insect pest biology with regards to its interaction with host. My research area deals with understanding the molecular basis of insect-plant interactions. In this broad field, I am specially interested in insect pests of crops such as rice and wheat. I have worked on gall midge, aphids and want to focus more on yellow stem borers. I want to understand aspects of virulence of these pests and also investigate into the role of different gut bacteria in virulence.
Samuel Helrich
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
samuel.helrich@tufts.edu

Bioactuation
Rajendra Chilukuri
Research Assoiciate,
Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Centre for DNA fingreprinting and Diagnostics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Daignostics, CDFD
Hyderabad Telangana India
cverajendra@gmail.com
LMG ,Laboratory of Molecualr Genetics
Sex Determination and Immunology
Eveline Verhulst
PhD
CV
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Wageningen The Netherlands
e.c.verhulst@gmail.com

My main research focuses on the evolution of sex determining mechanisms in insects. From 2014 onwards, I am funded by a NWO Veni grant to determine how this one conserved gene, called doublesex, can regulate the diverse sexual morphologies found in insects. This research is hosted at the Wageningen University (WUR) in the Laboratory of Genetics group. The main ambition of my research is to compare the sex determining pathways of three parasitic wasp species: Nasonia vitripennis, Muscidifurax raptorellus and M. uniraptor.
Sang Chan
Mr
Genetics
Cambridge University
Cambridge Cambs UK
ysc31@cam.ac.uk
Fly Facility
Genetic gene drive systems for insect population control.
varada abhyankar
MBRl, Department of Zoology
Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune
Pune Maharashtra India
varada.abhyankar@gmail.com
Molecular Biology Research laboratory
Epigenetic and molecular mechanisms involved in immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.
Zhao Chunyue
School of Life Sciences
Peking University
Bejing Beijing China
chunyuezhaopku@163.com

I use fly,cell culture and animal model systems to study cell death mechanisms and related drugs that can rescue or enhance cell death.
Nasiru Ibrahim
Prof
Crop Science
Usmanu Danfodiyo University,Sokoto,Nigeria
Sokoto Sokoto Nigeria
dolegoronyo@yahoo.com

My interest is looking at different plants for thier potential in controlling insect pest of field and stored produce
Wang Liuhao
School of Resource and Environment Science
Henan Institute of Science and Technology
Xinxiang Henan China
liuhaowang2007@163.com

Heat shock transcription factor of Bemisia tabaci
John Marshall
MRC Research Fellow
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology
Imperial College London
London London UK
john.marshall@imperial.ac.uk

My research focuses on the use of genetically modified (GM) mosquitoes to control malaria in sub-Saharan Africa. I have worked in a mosquito genetic engineering lab, and have developed mathematical models to describe the spread of anti-malaria genes through mosquito populations. I have also commentated on regulatory issues related to GM mosquitoes capable of spreading across international borders, and conducted the first public attitude survey on perspectives of people in Africa to GM mosquitoes for malaria control. Results from this survey suggested people would be supportive of GM mosquitoes that have been shown to work in confined field trials. This
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Scott Emrich
Computer Science and Engineering
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
semrich@nd.edu

Arthropod bioinformatics with a focus on vectors and ecologically important genome improvement/analysis
Peter Cherbas
Professor emeritus
Biology
Indiana University
Bloomington IN USA
cherbas@indiana.edu

Drosophila development. Ecdysone. Cell lines.
Susumu Hiragaki
PhD
Graduate School of Agricultural Science
Kobe University
Kobe Hyogo Japan
susumu.hiragaki@gmail.com

I am studying about 1) relationship between arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT)/melatonin and diurnal/seasonal physiology in insect, 2) development of new acaricide using unique GABA-receptor, and 3) regulatory mechanisms of insect endocrine system by Rab protein.
Yang Chan
Miss
Ecology and Insect Toxicology
Institute of Zoology
Beijing The city of Beijing China
yangchanhb@126.com

Ecology and Insect Toxicology
Hassan M. Ahmed
Developmental Biology
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
hmutasi@biologie.uni-goettingen.de
Wimmer Lab
My research focus in the use of developmental and molecular biology techniques to develop eco-friendly transgenic insect control strategies that can be used to fight insect of economical and public health importance (agricultural pest, diseases vectors).
Sang Chan
Mr
Genetics
Cambridge University
Cambridge Cambridgeshire United Kingdom
kermitthefly@gmail.com
Flylab
Genetic gene drive systems.
Fidel de la Cruz Hernandez-Hernandez
PhD
Infectomica y Patogenesis Molecular
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico DF Mexico
cruzcruz@cinvestav.mx
Molecular Entomology
Physiology of midgut, fat body and salivary glans during feeding.
Helena Richardson
Group Leader
CV
Research
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne V ictoria Australia
Drh_richardson@yahoo.com.au
Cell cycle and development lab
My research ulilizes the vinegar fly, Drosophila, to model tumourigenesis, with the vision of understanding how regulators of cell polarity and the actin cytoskeleton impact on cell signalling and cell proliferation, a field in which she is internationally recognised. She collaborates with mammalian researchers to translate her findings to mouse and human cancer models.
Kristen Brochu
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
kb532@cornell.edu

I study the digestive adaptations involved in specialist vs. generalist bee diet preferences.
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
Ariel Chipman
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Israel Israel
ariel.chipman@huji.ac.il

Arthropod evo-devo
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
Philip Batterham
Professor
Genetics Dept/Bio21 Institute
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
p.batterham@unimelb.edu.au
Systems biology of the insect:insecticide interface
There are three areas of research in my lab:- 1. The biology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are targeted by insecticides including neonicotinoids and spinosyns. 2. The systems biology of neonicotinoid metabolism and transport combining genetic and metabolomic approaches. 3. Pest insect genomics. Specifically we work on the flesh fly, Lucilia cuprina, and the moth, Helicoverpa armigera. Much of our research is conducted in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster, however we do bioassay the function of pest genes expressed in this species.
chao he
acedemic of plant protection
hunan agricultural university
changsha hunan China
837957358@qq.com

insectiside resistant
David Haymer
Professor
CV
Cell and Molecular Biology
University of Hawaii
Honolulu HI USA
dhaymer@hawaii.edu
Haymer lab
Molecular population genetics, molecular taxonomy of species complexes, Bactrocera dorsal is complex, Tephritidae
William Stumph
Professor
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
San Diego State University
San Diego CA USA
wstumph@mail.sdsu.edu

My lab studies the formation of RNA polymerase II and RNA polymerase III transcription pre-initiation complexes on genes that code for the small nuclear RNAs (U1-U6). We are interested in the molecular mechanisms that determine the RNA polymerase specificity of these genes (Pol II on U1-U5 versus Pol III on U6). We particularly study the snRNA gene-specific transcription factor SNAPc that binds about 40 to 60 base pairs upstream of both classes of genes.
Rodney Richardson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Columbus  Ohio USA
richardson.827@osu.edu

My research efforts focus on issues pertaining to toxicology and immunology in the European honey bee. Specifically, I am interested in the discovery and mechanistic explanation of how environmentally encountered xenobiotics affect insect immune function.
Reed Johnson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
johnson.5005@osu.edu

In our lab we are seeking to understand how pollinators interact with the pesticides and toxins they encounter. The managed European honey bee, Apis mellifera, serves as a model pollinator for toxicological testing and toxicogenomics. While the honey bee is the most economically important pollinator in the U.S. and serves as an excellent model species, we are also interested in other pollinating insects as well.
Vandana Hivrale
Dr. Vandana Hivrale
CV
Department of Biochemistry and molecular biology
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Ok, USA
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
vandanahivrale@hotmail.com
Biochemistry and molecular biology
At my institute (Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad), we are attempting to screen of non-host Protease inhibitor /Amylase inhibitor proteins for developing Helicoverpa armigera tolerance in important crop plants like pigeonpea, cotton and tomato. In India, H. armigera is responsible for preharvest losses of pigeonpea, chickpea, cotton, tomato, okra etc and storage pests such as callosobruchus and tribolium spp for post harvest damage. One of the sustainable solutions to this problem is development of insect-resistant transgenic plants using two transgenes (PI/AI), however, effect of such transgene expression in these plants has yet to be investigated.
Gulsaz Shamim
CV
Department of Bio-Engineering
Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra
Ranchi Jharkhand India
gulsazshamim@gmail.com
Research Scholar
Insect Biotechnology
Hadley Horch
Associate Professor
CV
Biology and Neuroscience
Bowdoin College
Brunswick Maine United States
hhorch@bowdoin.edu
Horch Lab
The Horch lab uses the cricket model system to examine the molecular neurobiological basis of injury-induced compensatory plasticity. Unlike many neuronal systems, the auditory system of the cricket demonstrates robust neuronal growth in response to deafferentation. Removing one ear induces auditory interneurons to sprout new dendrites, grow abnormally across the mid-line, and form synapses with intact auditory neurons from the opposite ear. Our research aims to unearth the molecular basis of these anatomical changes as well as understand the cellular and funcitonal consequences of this plasticity. We are also attempting to develop transgenic lines with targeted
TRANG LE THI DIEU
Dr.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
ltdtrang@hcmuaf.edu.vn
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Seth Donoughe
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
seth.donoughe@gmail.com

Insect development and evolution
Shyh-Chi Chen
Ophthalmology
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati Ohio USA
shyhchi@gmail.com

circadian rhythm
Tom Walsh
Research Scientist
Land and Water
CSIRO
Canberra ACT Australia
tom.walsh@csiro.au

I'm particularly interested in resistance to pesticides and using genomic and molecular techniques to investigate the evolutionary history and functional biology of these traits.
Magali Eychenne
Entomology
INRA
Montpellier cedex 05 Languedoc Roussillon France
magali.eychenne@univ-montp2.fr
DGIMI
Lepidopteran functionnal genomics
Maike Hink
Biochemistry & Physiology
Pest Control Research
Bayer CropScience AG
Monheim NRW Germany
maike.hink@bayer.com

Insect neuroscience
Chaoyang Zhao
Entomology
Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
zhaochaoyang2009@gmail.com

I am interested in understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the process of insect-plant interaction. My current research focuses on the characterization of horizontally transferred genes gained by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) from microorgansims, which may have increased insect adaption to harbor distinct ecological niches. I had also been working on the Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor), attempting to understand how it interacts with its host plant - wheat. Using genetic mapping and genome sequence-based tools, we have discovered three avirulence genes or gene candidates (vH6, vH24 and vHdic) in the Hessian fly, which supports the gene-for-gene hypothesis and the
Anna-Maria Botha
Professor PhD
Genetics
Stellenbosch University
Stellenbosch Western Cape South Africa
ambo@sun.ac.za
Cereal Genomics
The Genomics research group at Stellenbosch, headed by Prof. Anna-Maria Botha-Oberholster aims to be at the forefront of research on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) resistance to Diuraphis noxia (Kurdj., Hemiptera, Aphididae), although other important plant stressors are also under investigation. Our research is hypothesis driven and fundamental in nature, but aims to address current problems relevant to the agricultural community. Research focus Russian wheat aphid resistance Research in the Cereal Genome programme focuses on the elucidation of the underlying genetic mechanisms involved in host-pest interactions by making use of genomic tools. Understanding defence mechanisms in the wheat host and how
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran
m.ghafourim@yahoo.com

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
Graham Thompson
Associate Professor
Biology
Western University
London Ontario Canada
graham.thompson@uwo.ca
The Social Biology Group
My lab studies the biological basis of insect social behaviour; how it evolves, how it is maintained and why some species are social while others are not. Much like human societies, eusocial ants, bees, wasps and termites show bewildering complexity in how their societies are structured. Yet for insects, this complexity is derived from an economically simple division of labour into reproductive and non-reproductive specialists. Studying reproductive division of labour in insects at the level of the gene can provide key insights into how complex social systems evolved from simpler, ancestral ones. Studies on social insects can also help understand
Guy Bloch
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem - None - Israel
guy.bloch@mail.huji.ac.il
Molecular Sociobiolgy
The main research interests of our group are the evolution and mechanisms underlying sociality and social behavior, we study bees as a model. To study these fascinating and intricate phenomena we integrate analyses at different levels, from molecular to social. In recent years, one of our main research focuses has been the interplay between circadian rhythms and social behavior ("sociochronobiology").
Xi’en Chen
Dr.
College of Plant Protection
Northwest A&F University
Yangling Shannxi China
chenpp2006@nwsuaf.edu.cn

The physiological roles of insect protein phosphatases; molecular basis of physiological changes in insects under abiotic and/or biotic stresses; Xenobiotic resistance in insects resulting from metabolic enzymes and/or target site insensitivity; in vitro degradation of insecticide by insect metabolic enzymes
Sufang Zhang
Assistant Professor
Forest Protection
Research Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection
Beijing Beijing China
zhangsf@caf.ac.cn

Forest insect olfactory mechanisms, Forest protection, Forest pest management
yongjun Zhang
PhD, Professor
Entomology
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
yjzhang@ippcaas.cn

(1) chemical communication regulation between insect pests and host plant, (2) regulation of insect olfactory behaviour, (3) resistance of host plants to insect pests, and (4) bio-safety of GMOs
hongyu zhang
Dr Prof
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology, College of Plant Science and Technology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology
Wuhan Hubei China
2496398633@qq.com
Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology
Insect molecular and Microbiology, Control techniques of Urban and Horticultural insect pests, especially fruit fly etc citrus insect pests.
yosra khalfallah
PhD student
Biology
university of Tunis el manar
Djerba Medenine Tunisia
yosra_khalfallah0607@yahoo.fr
génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures à intéret agronomique
microRNAs implicate in plant pathogen interactions
Subbarayalu Mohankumar
Professor
Plant biotechnology
Tamil Nadu agricultural university
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
Smktnau@gmail.com
Molecular ecology
Molecular ecology of crop- pest interactions, diversity of pollinators , IPM, pest genetics and genomics
Philipp Lehmann
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyväskylä
Jyväskylä Central Finland Finland
philipp.lehmann@jyu.fi

My research area covers both behavioral and physiological aspects of survival in and expansion to environments with large seasonal fluctuations. I primarily study energetic and immunity related stress responses during insect diapause in high latitude environments.
Mark Rheault
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of British Columbia
Kelowna British Columbia Canada
mark.rheault@ubc.ca
Rheault Lab
Our lab strives to understand how transporting epithelia of insects such as the, salivary glands, midgut, Malpighian tubules, hindgut and anal papillae of various insects play a role in the ionoregulation, osmoregulation, and the excretion of potentially toxic endogeneous or exogenous compounds. In order to elucidate mechanisms responsible for these phenomena our lab uses an integrative approach which includes gene level to to whole organism studies.
Subhash Lakhotia
Professor
Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology
Banaras Hindu University
Varanasi UP India
lakhotia@bhu.ac.in

Major current research interests using Drosophila as the model organism: cell stress related gene expression in development, long non-coding RNAs, stress proteins in tumour development, neurodegenerative disorders, Ayurvedic Biology
Elsayed Hafez
Professor
CV
Plant Protection and Biomolecular Diagnosis
City for Scientific Research and technology applications, Arid lands cultivation research institute
Alexandria Alexandria  Egypt
elsayed_hafez@yahoo.com
Molecular Biology Lab
we are interested in studying of the honey bee genome (Egyptian strain).
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Salva Herrero
Associate Professor
Department of Genetics
Universitat de Valencia
Burjassot Valencia España
sherrero@uv.es
GenBqBt Insect-Pathogen Interaction
Studies in our group aim to determine and characterize the components involved in the interaction of Lepidoptera larvae with their pathogens as well as determine novel proteins and mechanisms that could also contribute to reduce the detrimental effects of the pathogens. We are mainly focused on the study of the response of the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) to two entomopathogens such as Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus. In this context, our main objectives are: • Development of genetic tools for the study of pathogen interaction with S. exigua. • Characterization of tritrophic interactions in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis
Gregor Bucher
Professor
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
gbucher1@uni-goettingen.de
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
I am interested in the developmental genetics of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum with a focus on the evolution of development. The current topics of the lab are: 1. Large scale RNAi screen "iBeetle" 2. Genetics of insect head development 3. Evolution of neural stem cells of the central complex 4. Pattern formation during meetamorphosis. 5. Development of transgenic tools (misexpression, in vivo imaging, etc).
Justin Jang Hann Chu
Asst. Professor
Microbiology
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
miccjh@nus.edu.sg
Laboratory of Molecular RNA virology and Antiviral Strategies
Mosquito-borne viruses, dengue virus, chikungunya virus, mosquito-viral interactions
Jonas Schwirz
Project Group Bioresources
Fraunhofer IME
Giessen Hessen Germany
jonas.schwirz@ime.fraunhofer.de

Drosophila genetics and transgenesis
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Ryan Smith
Assistant Professor
Entomology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
smithr@iastate.edu

Mosquito immunity and genetics My research goals aim to address fundamental questions regarding the innate immune system to better understand how malaria parasites are eliminated from their mosquito host.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Lucy Firth
Dr
Invertebrate Genetics
Syngenta
Bracknell Berkshire UK
lucy.firth@syngenta.com
Dr. Lucy C. Firth
Drosophila genetic technologies to uncover and understand insecticidal mode of action targets and resistance. Comparative genomics of agronomic pest species.
Sara Oppenheim
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
American Museum of Natural History
NY NY USA
saraoppenheim@gmail.com

The evolution of host plant use and diet breadth in specialists and generalists.
Don Champagne
Associate Professor
Entomology/Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases
University of Georgia
Athens Georgia USA
dchampa@uga.edu
Champagne Lab
I am interested in characterizing salivary factors that facilitate blood feeding by arthropods. More specifically, I am interested in proteins and peptides that modulate vertebrate hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses.
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Aline Edith Noutcha
Dr- Senior Lecturer
CV
Entomology & Pest Management Unit, Department of Animal & Environmental Biology
University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria
Port Harcourt Rivers State Nigeria
naemekeu@yahoo.com
Entomology & Pest Management Research Lab
Understanding Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases eg: Malaria, Filariases (Epidemiology, Immunology, Parasitology, Genomics, Entomology, Cytogenetics, Cell Biology) Prevention & Control of Vector Borne Infectious Diseases (Community Education on Basic Control Practices and Healthy Life Styles, Good Environmental Practices; Inventory of Cultural Control Methods among various communities; Determination of factors affecting compliance of imported/prescribed control approaches). Monitoring Resistance phenomena in Insect & Parasites.
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
Shirley Luckhart
Professor
Medical Microbiology and Immunology
UC Davis
Davis CA United States
sluckhart@ucdavis.edu

General areas of research in the laboratory include: the molecular cell biology and biochemistry of malaria parasite transmission, the functional characterization of the immunological crosstalk and cell signaling that occurs between the mosquito and the mammalian host during bloodfeeding, and the impact of endemic co-infections on malaria parasite development and transmission. Specific research projects include: the conserved signal transduction pathways involved in anti-parasite host innate immunity; systems biology and function of immune factors and cell signaling pathways that are activated between mosquitoes and their mammalian hosts at the interface of bloodfeeding; identification and functional analyses of naturally occurring genetic polymorphisms
Joanna Chiu
Assistant Professor
Entomology and Nematology
UC Davis
Davis CA USA
jcchiu@ucdavis.edu

Circadian Biology, Proteomics, Phylogenomics
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Punya Nachappa
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
Indiana University-Purdue University
Fort Wayne Indiana United States
nachappa@ipfw.edu

My research seeks to understand the ecological consequences and molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between plants, pathogens, and insect vectors. The two key questions of my research program are: (1) how do pathogens affect biology and ecology of their hosts including, insects and plants? and (2) what plant and/or insect responses mediate plant-pathogen-vector interactions?
Daniel Sonenshine
Professor (Emeritus)
Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk Virginia United States
dsonensh@odu.edu
Tick Lab
Neurobiology of ticks; transcriptomics; neuropeptides, neurotransmitters; tick-borne pathogens; innate immunity; pheromones.
Christina Schulte
CV
Heinrich-Heine University
Evolutionary Genetics
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
christina-schulte@gmx.de

Honeybee workers show altruistic behaviors in contrast to queens and drones, which show behaviors that are related to reproduction. The collective behaviors of the worker bees produce group phenotypes that allow them to remain well-adapted in a changing environment. These worker specific behaviors have been largely described but we have little understanding of the molecular control that specifies these behaviors in the brain during development, and of its evolution that gave rise to social behaviors during the last 60 million years. Differentiation of the worker brain is specified by female- and caste-determining signals. The sex-determining signal is implemented by Feminizer protein
Maohua Chen
Prof.
CV
Department of Entomology
Northwest A&F University
Yangling Shaanxi Province China
maohua.chen@nwsuaf.edu.cn
Insecticide Resistance and Insect Population Genetics
I am using molecular markers (microstatellites, mitochondrial genes and other makers) to investigate how environmental and anthropogenic factors affect the genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow pattern of insect populations.
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Wayne Hunter
Research Entomologist
Subtropical Insects Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Fort Pierce Florida USA
wayne.hunter@ars.usda.gov
U.S. Horticultural Research Lab
RNAi to manage hemipteran pests, Psyllid & Leafhopper Genomics. Viral pathogens, cell culture.
Susanta Behura
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
sbehura@nd.edu

My work focuses on insect genetics and genomics. My primary interests are on functional and evolutionary genomics of vector competence of Aedes aegypti to dengue virus infection. Other specific areas of interest are 1) Comparative genomics, 2) Transcriptomics 3) Codon bias and translational selection, 4) Mitochondria and Numt, 5) Transposable elements and repeat sequences, 6) Non-coding RNAs, 7) Genome sequencing and analysis, and genome-wide association studies.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Dr. Rakesh Mishra
CV
CCMB
Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology
Hyderabad Telangana India
mishra@ccmb.res.in
Senior Principal Scientist and Group Leader
We are interested in understanding how non-coding part of the genome, including repetitive sequences, brings about cell type specific is packaging and how once this packaging established it is maintained by epigenetic cellular memory mechanisms. We use Hox gene complexes as loci in model systems, Drosophila and zebrafish, to address theses issues address evolution of complexity in animals. By analyzing the genome organization in the context of nuclear architecture we study the structural basis of cellular memory. We propose that embryonic development is setting up of functional form of genome (epigenome or cell type specific chromatin) starting from the stem cell
Yehuda Ben-Shahar
Assistant Professor
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis Missouri USA
benshahary@wustl.edu
Ben-Shahar lab at Wash U
We are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity on three major time scales: evolutionary, Developmental and Physiological. We address these questions with the powerful genetic model Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), and the emerging model for complex social behaviors, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Research approaches in the lab include behavior, genetics, genomics, molecular and cellular biology, and neurophysiology.
Mr. JJ Hanly
Graduate Student
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambirdge Cambridge United Kingdom
jjh55@cam.ac.uk
Butterfly Genetics Group
I am interested the role of regulatory mutations in evolution of morphology. I investigate this using the red pattern elements of the wings of Heliconius butterflies.
Amy Toth
Assistant Professor
Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University
Ames Iowa United States
amytoth@iastate.edu
Assistant Professor
We use an integrative approach, blending behavior, ecology, physiology, and genomics, to discover new insights into the mechanisms and evolution of social behavior. We are also investigating the roles of nutrition, viruses, and landscapes on pollinator health and conservation. Our main study systems are honey bees (Apis mellifera) and paper wasps (genus Polistes).
J. Spencer Johnston
Professor
Entomology/Genetics
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
spencerj@tamu.edu
We estimate do Genome Size Estimates for genomics projects
My primary interest is in genome size evolution and genome architecture. The Alab specializes in Arthropod genome size estimates, but routinely determinse genome size for a wide variety of organisms. We take pride in estimates that are timely, accurate and precise, and follow these estimates through to final publication of completed genomes, phylogenomic and genomic surveys. We also study population structure, working primarily on honey bees. These studies include microsatellite loci, SNPs, genomic and quantitative cytogenetics.
Kushal Suryamohan
CV
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo
Buffalo New York USA
kushalsuryamohan@gmail.com

As a Computer Science graduate and a PhD candidate in Biochemistry, I am interested in both computational biology and wet-lab genetics/molecular biology. In collaboration with the Sinha lab in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (http://www.sinhalab.net/sinha-s-home), we have developed a computational pipeline to predict cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) genome-wide in evolutionarily diverged dipteran species such as the honey bee, malaria mosquito, wasp, and the flour beetle, by using enhancers identified experimentally in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am interested in the gene regulatory circuitry for central nervous system specification in the fruit
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Josephine Reinhardt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Biology
University of Maryland College Park
College Park MD USA
reinharj@umd.edu
http://igtrcn.org/participant/gerald-wilkinson/
I am currently studying several aspects of the genomics of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), which are best known as a model for sexual selection and meiotic drive. Recently, it was also discovered the T. dalmanni have a sex chromosome distinct from both the ancestral X and the X in Drosophila, making them an interesting comparative model for aspects of sex-chromosome evolution. We recently released a transcriptome assembly as part of an analysis that identified genes that are differentially regulated in males carrying a driving sex chromosome. We are currently assembling and annotating the T. dalmanni genome.
Paul Shirk
Research Physiologist
CV
Insect Behavior and Biocontrol Research Unit
USDA-ARS CMAVE
Gainesville Florida USA
paul.shirk@ars.usda.gov
Shirk Lab
The Shirk lab is currently creating the genetic and microbiological tools necessary to genetically transform obligate intracellular alpha-proteobacteria particularly Wolbachia. This requires modification and application of transgenic systems utilized in transgenesis of insects. We are also collaborating with other labs to achieve somatic and germline transformation of the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis, the varroa mite, Varroa destructor, and the Mediterranean flour moth, Ephestia kuehniella employing piggyBac vectors.
Frederique Hilliou
Santé des Plantes et Environnement
INRA
Sophia Antipolis cedex alpes maritimes FRANCE
hilliou@sophia.inra.fr
Institut Sopha Agrobiotech
The team I am working with at INRA of Sophia Antipolis, France, is involved in studying the mechanistic bases and evolution of insect traits essential to adapt to the biotic and abiotic environment. My main project has been developed to decipher the way Lepidoptera adapt to chemically adverse environments (using genomic approaches, and through the prism of the CYP genes and P450 enzymes they encode). We have focused on adaptation of the polyphagous noctuid pest S. frugiperda. We have developed an oligonucleotide microarray covering almost 10,000 genes from this species and contributed to the sequence of ESTs. Transcriptomic results show
Stephanie Mohr
Director of the DRSC
Genetics
Harvard Medical School
Boston MA USA
stephanie_mohr@hms.harvard.edu
Drosophila RNAi Screening Center & Genome Engineering Production Group
At the Drosophila RNAi Screening Center (DRSC) and more recently founded Genome Engineering Production Group (GEPG), we focus on the use of and new developments in RNA interference (RNAi), the CRISPR/Cas system, and other functional genomics approaches, including genome engineering. We are a community-focused group dedicated to transferring technologies, know-how and research materials to others for their research. We also have a growing suite of software tools and databases. Our resources are developed primarily for use with Drosophila melanogaster but many of the same approaches, underlying software, research materials, etc. can be used for non-model insects.
Marc Halfon
Associate Professor
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
mshalfon@buffalo.edu

My laboratory maintains an active research program divided between Drosophila molecular genetics and computational/bioinformatics. Current research in the laboratory falls into three main areas: (a) discovery and characterization of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in Drosophila and other holometabolous insects, (b) promoter-CRM interactions, and (c) mechanisms of specificity for receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, with a focus on mesoderm development. I am also the developer and curator of the REDfly database of Drosophila transcriptional regulatory elements and as such am active in the field of genome annotation and in providing community-accessible database resources.
Rob Harrell Robert Harrell
ITF Manager
undergraduate
Insect Transformation Facility
IBBR-University of Maryland
Rockville Maryland United States
harrelr@umd.edu
University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility
The University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility (UM-ITF) provides functional genomics researchers access to transgenic and non-transgenic genome altering technologies. The techniques for altering insect genomes have been available for many years however they have not been widely used, mainly because the technology requires a high level of expertise and specialized equipment. The mission of the UM-ITF is to aid researchers in the creation of genetically modified insects through; fee for service microinjection of insects with developed genome altering protocols, collaboration to develop genome altering protocols for insects without such protocols, training for researchers who are interested in
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Channa Aluvihare
Research Technician
technician
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland College Park at Shady Grove
Rockville MD USA
aluvihar@umd.edu
Insect Transformation Facility
Insect rearing for genetic modification, genetically modified organisms and gene delivery systems.
Alfred Handler
Research Geneticist
faculty
Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Gainesville FL United States
al.handler@ars.usda.gov
none
Our research is focused on understanding and manipulating the genes of tephritid fruit flies, a group of invasive pests of significant agricultural importance. We study transposable elements and their use as vectors for germ-line transformation, and development of new vector systems for genomic targeting and transgene stability.
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
kmichel@ksu.edu
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.
David O’Brochta
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology; Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland
dobrocht@umd.edu
Rockville MD United States
dobrocht@umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
Our research focuses on insect molecular genetics with particular interest in the study of insects that transmit human diseases although our interests are very broad. Our interests in genetics center around the study of transposable elements.  Those interests range from questions concerning their basic biology and aspects of their movement to more applied question concerning their development and use as genome manipulation tools.  Our insect interests are centered mainly on mosquitoes and the physiological genetics of Plasmodium infection.