Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Roopa H.K
Researcher
CV
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research
London harrow United Kingdom
roopa21hk@gmail.com

my research focus is mainly on Insect pests management. Implementing eco-friendly management programs like biocontrol, entamopathogens like fungi, bacteria. And also using advance technologies like gene regulation, CRISPR / cas9 system. Identifying insect self limiting genes in case of whitefly, Bemisia tabaci for its management and reduce vector potency to various crops.
Alexis Hill
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis MO USA
alexis.s.hill@wustl.edu

Genes and behavior
Daniel Hasegawa
Research Molecular Biologist
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
Charleston SC USA
daniel.k.hasegawa@gmail.com

I am broadly interested in understanding the molecular and physiological processes that drive insect-virus relationships. I have joined the IGTRCN because I am interested in utilizing gene editing technologies to: 1) further understand insect-virus relationships that have agricultural importance; 2) develop translational tools for more effective and precise insect pest management practices.
Sarah Hamm
Biosciences
University of Exeter
Penryn Cornwall UK
sh580@exeter.ac.uk

Investigating the molecular basis of insecticide resistance in the Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua
Lewis Hun
Lewis Hun M.S
CV
Entomology and Insect Science
University of Arizona
Tucson AZ United States
Lewisvibulhun@email.arizona.edu
The Riehle Lab
I'm interested in new strategies for controlling mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit. Malaria is one of the leading causes of death from infectious diseases worldwide. The mosquitoes Anopheles stephensi is a major vector of the causative Plasmodium agents in India. Due to emerging challenges such as drug resistance in Plasmodium and insecticide resistance in the mosquito, there is an increasing need for novel malaria control strategies. Malaria parasites must develop for up to two weeks in the mosquito, and conceptually, this development can be disrupted by enhancing mosquito innate immunity or by shortening the mosquito's lifespan. The insulin/IGF-1 signaling
Andrew Hammond
Research Associate
Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London Greater London United Kingdom
andrew.hammond08@imperial.ac.uk
Crisanti Lab
Gene drives in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae
Rafael Homem
Biological Chemistry and Crop Protection Department
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden England United Kingdom
rafael.homem@rothamsted.ac.uk

Insecticide resistance
Allison Hansen
Department of Entomology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois United States
akh@illinois.edu
Hansen Lab
The main focus of my research laboratory is to investigate host-symbiont interactions between sap-sucking insects (e.g., psyllids, whiteflies, scale insects) and their ancient obligate bacterial symbionts, because of their highly co-evolved and shared amino acid metabolisms. Due to genome-enabled sequencing technology, the regulation of this co-evolved amino-acid symbiosis is an emerging area of research in these unculturable microbe-insect systems.
Tofazzal Hossain Howlader
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Bangladesh Agricultural University
Mymensingh Mymensingh Bangladesh
tofazzalh@gmail.com

Bacillus thuringiensis, Entomopathogenic fungi
Juan Hurtado
Ecology, Genetics and Evolution
IEGEBA - University of Buenos Aires
C.A. Buenos Aires C.A. Buenos Aires Argentina
hurtado.juanp@gmail.com

Reproductive Biology and Evolution
Meredith Hawley
Research and Development Specialist
Pest Screening
Bayer NA - CropScience Division
Morrisville North Carolina United States of America
meredith.hawley@bayer.com
Research and Development Specialist
Investigating potential traits providing pest resistance in agricultural crops of interest
Mohammad Haddadi
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
University of Zabol
Zabol Sistan and Baluchestan Iran
hadadimohamad@gmail.com
Molecular Neurobiology
Aging and neuronal dysfunction.
Dan Hahn
Associate Professor
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville FL USA
dahahn@ufl.edu

ecological and evolutionary physiology, physiological and genetic architecture of adaptation, applications of stress biology to biological control
Keith Hopper
Dr.
CV
Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Newark DE USA
khopper@udel.edu
USDA-ARS-Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit
The central theme of my research is to determine the mechanisms affecting host specificity of parasitic and herbivorous insects. My lab is testing alternative hypotheses about the genetic architecture of specificity: many genes interacting epistatically versus few genes interacting additively. Evolutionary shifts are much less likely under the first hypothesis than under the second. We are studing the genomics and transcriptomics of differences in host specificity among insect species.
Qian Han
Professor
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences
Hainan University
Haikou Hainan China
qian_han@yahoo.com
Tropical Veterinary Medicine and Vector Biology
My research interests are in tropical veterinary medicine and vector biology, particularly biology of mosquitoes and epidemiology of vector-borne animal diseases in Hainan Island of China.
Heather Hines
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology, Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
hmh19@psu.edu
Hines Lab
My lab examines the evolution of adaptive trait variation, focusing heavily on the evolution of mimetic patterning. We are pushing a new system for evolutionary genetics and evo-devo in discovery of the genes that are driving the radiation in coloration, largely as a result of mimicry, in the bumble bees. We utilize more descriptive analytical chemsitry, developmental and systematic approaches, and combine these with genomic and transcriptomic approaches to target candidate genes for mimicry and better understand the evolution of this adaptive diversification. Once these genes are targeted we can gain a better understanding of how these novel phenotypes evolved,
Mahadeva swamy H M
Dr.
Division of Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bengaluru Karnataka INDIA
clintonbio@gmail.com
Bio-Pesticide Lab
Integrated Pest management, Coleoptera and plant parasitic nematodes control, Bacillus thuringiensis, RNAi in insect pest management, Formulation of agrochemicals,
Jason Hill
Zoologi
Stockholm University
Stockholm Stockholm Sweden
jason.hill@zoologi.su.se

Lepidopteran evolutionary genomics. Specifically butterfly adaptation in the wild.
Laura Harrington
Professor
Department of Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
lch27@cornell.edu
Harrington lab
Research in the Harrington lab focuses on mosquito vector ecology, biology, and behavior. Our goal is to understand basic (and often overlooked) aspects of mosquito biology in order to identify new targets for controlling mosquitoes and reducing transmission of vector-borne diseases.
Jingfei Huang
Dr.
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Plant Protection
Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
Fuzhou Fujian China
jfhuang@fafu.edu.cn

insect genome; insecticide resistance; programmed cell death
Samuel Helrich
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
samuel.helrich@tufts.edu

Bioactuation
Susumu Hiragaki
PhD
Graduate School of Agricultural Science
Kobe University
Kobe Hyogo Japan
susumu.hiragaki@gmail.com

I am studying about 1) relationship between arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT)/melatonin and diurnal/seasonal physiology in insect, 2) development of new acaricide using unique GABA-receptor, and 3) regulatory mechanisms of insect endocrine system by Rab protein.
Fidel de la Cruz Hernandez-Hernandez
PhD
Infectomica y Patogenesis Molecular
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico DF Mexico
cruzcruz@cinvestav.mx
Molecular Entomology
Physiology of midgut, fat body and salivary glans during feeding.
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
chao he
acedemic of plant protection
hunan agricultural university
changsha hunan China
837957358@qq.com

insectiside resistant
David Haymer
Professor
CV
Cell and Molecular Biology
University of Hawaii
Honolulu HI USA
dhaymer@hawaii.edu
Haymer lab
Molecular population genetics, molecular taxonomy of species complexes, Bactrocera dorsal is complex, Tephritidae
Vandana Hivrale
Dr. Vandana Hivrale
CV
Department of Biochemistry and molecular biology
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Ok, USA
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
vandanahivrale@hotmail.com
Biochemistry and molecular biology
At my institute (Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad), we are attempting to screen of non-host Protease inhibitor /Amylase inhibitor proteins for developing Helicoverpa armigera tolerance in important crop plants like pigeonpea, cotton and tomato. In India, H. armigera is responsible for preharvest losses of pigeonpea, chickpea, cotton, tomato, okra etc and storage pests such as callosobruchus and tribolium spp for post harvest damage. One of the sustainable solutions to this problem is development of insect-resistant transgenic plants using two transgenes (PI/AI), however, effect of such transgene expression in these plants has yet to be investigated.
Hadley Horch
Associate Professor
CV
Biology and Neuroscience
Bowdoin College
Brunswick Maine United States
hhorch@bowdoin.edu
Horch Lab
The Horch lab uses the cricket model system to examine the molecular neurobiological basis of injury-induced compensatory plasticity. Unlike many neuronal systems, the auditory system of the cricket demonstrates robust neuronal growth in response to deafferentation. Removing one ear induces auditory interneurons to sprout new dendrites, grow abnormally across the mid-line, and form synapses with intact auditory neurons from the opposite ear. Our research aims to unearth the molecular basis of these anatomical changes as well as understand the cellular and funcitonal consequences of this plasticity. We are also attempting to develop transgenic lines with targeted
Maike Hink
Biochemistry & Physiology
Pest Control Research
Bayer CropScience AG
Monheim NRW Germany
maike.hink@bayer.com

Insect neuroscience
Elsayed Hafez
Professor
CV
Plant Protection and Biomolecular Diagnosis
City for Scientific Research and technology applications, Arid lands cultivation research institute
Alexandria Alexandria  Egypt
elsayed_hafez@yahoo.com
Molecular Biology Lab
we are interested in studying of the honey bee genome (Egyptian strain).
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Salva Herrero
Associate Professor
Department of Genetics
Universitat de Valencia
Burjassot Valencia España
sherrero@uv.es
GenBqBt Insect-Pathogen Interaction
Studies in our group aim to determine and characterize the components involved in the interaction of Lepidoptera larvae with their pathogens as well as determine novel proteins and mechanisms that could also contribute to reduce the detrimental effects of the pathogens. We are mainly focused on the study of the response of the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) to two entomopathogens such as Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus. In this context, our main objectives are: • Development of genetic tools for the study of pathogen interaction with S. exigua. • Characterization of tritrophic interactions in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis
Wayne Hunter
Research Entomologist
Subtropical Insects Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Fort Pierce Florida USA
wayne.hunter@ars.usda.gov
U.S. Horticultural Research Lab
RNAi to manage hemipteran pests, Psyllid & Leafhopper Genomics. Viral pathogens, cell culture.
Mr. JJ Hanly
Graduate Student
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambirdge Cambridge United Kingdom
jjh55@cam.ac.uk
Butterfly Genetics Group
I am interested the role of regulatory mutations in evolution of morphology. I investigate this using the red pattern elements of the wings of Heliconius butterflies.
Frederique Hilliou
Santé des Plantes et Environnement
INRA
Sophia Antipolis cedex alpes maritimes FRANCE
hilliou@sophia.inra.fr
Institut Sopha Agrobiotech
The team I am working with at INRA of Sophia Antipolis, France, is involved in studying the mechanistic bases and evolution of insect traits essential to adapt to the biotic and abiotic environment. My main project has been developed to decipher the way Lepidoptera adapt to chemically adverse environments (using genomic approaches, and through the prism of the CYP genes and P450 enzymes they encode). We have focused on adaptation of the polyphagous noctuid pest S. frugiperda. We have developed an oligonucleotide microarray covering almost 10,000 genes from this species and contributed to the sequence of ESTs. Transcriptomic results show
Marc Halfon
Associate Professor
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
mshalfon@buffalo.edu

My laboratory maintains an active research program divided between Drosophila molecular genetics and computational/bioinformatics. Current research in the laboratory falls into three main areas: (a) discovery and characterization of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in Drosophila and other holometabolous insects, (b) promoter-CRM interactions, and (c) mechanisms of specificity for receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, with a focus on mesoderm development. I am also the developer and curator of the REDfly database of Drosophila transcriptional regulatory elements and as such am active in the field of genome annotation and in providing community-accessible database resources.
Rob Harrell Robert Harrell
ITF Manager
undergraduate
Insect Transformation Facility
IBBR-University of Maryland
Rockville Maryland United States
harrelr@umd.edu
University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility
The University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility (UM-ITF) provides functional genomics researchers access to transgenic and non-transgenic genome altering technologies. The techniques for altering insect genomes have been available for many years however they have not been widely used, mainly because the technology requires a high level of expertise and specialized equipment. The mission of the UM-ITF is to aid researchers in the creation of genetically modified insects through; fee for service microinjection of insects with developed genome altering protocols, collaboration to develop genome altering protocols for insects without such protocols, training for researchers who are interested in
Alfred Handler
Research Geneticist
faculty
Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Gainesville FL United States
al.handler@ars.usda.gov
none
Our research is focused on understanding and manipulating the genes of tephritid fruit flies, a group of invasive pests of significant agricultural importance. We study transposable elements and their use as vectors for germ-line transformation, and development of new vector systems for genomic targeting and transgene stability.