Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
saptarshi ghosh
Department of Entomology
Volcani Center, Agriculture research organisation, Israel
Rishon Lezion Rishon Lezion Israel
sunnysaptarshi@gmail.com

Insect-vector interactions
Maria Soto-Aguilar
Project Scientist
Department of Plant Pathology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
msotoaguilar@ucdavis.edu

plant-pathogen-vector interaction
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
chithravel vadivalagan
Molecular Entomology, Pest and Parasites Insects
CV
Zoology
Bharathiar University
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
marinedrug.9@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
My field of interest includes Molecular Ecology, Evolutionary genetics of vector born diseases and their potential vectors control by using biosynthesized Nanoparticles. I am much interested in Genomics of pest, parasites and novel haplotype variations for adaptive radiation of vector born diseases
Andrew Guinness
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
aguinnes@nd.edu

Broadly, I am interested in molecular signalling and transgenic targets in insect vectors, most specifically applied to mosquitoes.
David Kang
Postdoctoral Fellow
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN United States
dkang3@nd.edu
Severson Laboratory
I investigate the impact of stressors on Aedes aegypti mosquito susceptibility to arboviruses. Ultimately, my overarching goal is to capitalize on genetic variation to reduce the transmission of neglected tropical diseases.
Xu Wang
Assistant Professor
Pathobiology
Auburn University
Auburn University AL United States
xzw0070@auburn.edu

Genomics, Epigenomics, Microbiome, Evolution, Gene Expression
Ewald Große-Wilde
Evolutionary Neuroethology
MPI for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thüringen Germany
ewald.grosse.wilde@gmail.com

Arthropod chemosensation.
Matthew Edgington
Dr
Artropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
matt.edgington@pirbright.ac.uk

Mainly working on mathematical modelling of engineered underdominance gene drive systems in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes but also some other classes of gene drive.
Antonis Giakountis
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larisa Larisa Greece
agiakountis@uth.gr
Molecular Biology and Genomics
long non-coding RNAs, chromatin architecture, epigenomics, transcriptional regulation, development
Kathryn Weglarz
Biology
Utah State University
Logan UT USA
kathryn.weglarz@usu.edu

I study genome evolution in insect symbionts.
jacinta chuang
Sr. reseatch scientist
biochemistry
ut southwestern med ctr
dallas tx usa
jacinta.chuang@utsouthwestern.edu

metabolic diseases
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Adam CN Wong
Assistant Professor
Entomology and Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
adamcnwong@ufl.edu

Our laboratory is broadly interested in insect-microbe interactions that span the areas of symbiosis, pathogenesis, metabolism, nutrition and behavior. A major theme is to integrate omics, molecular and ecological approaches to better understand how the gut microbiome modulates insect physiological responses to changing environment and the virulence mechanisms of gut pathogens. We use Drosophila as our primary research model with the goal of translating into agriculturally- and medically-important insects for novel management strategies.
Nicole Gutzmann
Graduate Student
Entomology
NCSU
Raleigh NC United States
negutzma@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
Functional and social analysis of pest management technologies and their development
Kai-Shu Ling
Research Plant Pathologist
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Charleston SC USA
kai.ling@ars.usda.gov

Study virus-vector interactions, epidemiology and management of insect-transmitted viral diseases, particularly whitefly-transmitted viruses in plants.
Andrew Legan
PhD student
Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University
Ithaca New York United States
awl75@cornell.edu
Sheehan Lab
I am interested in major evolutionary transitions in individuality, such as the evolution of eusociality. As a graduate student, I study the primitively eusocial wasp genus Polistes, and I aim to describe the neurobiological and genomic mechanisms of chemosensation and their relevance to communication. By using a functional genetic approach in multiple paper wasp species, I hope to alter the production and perception of chemical signals in order to shed light on the function of chemical communication in social recognition, mating, and development.
Ramkumar Govindaraju
Dr
Biotechnology
Periyar University, Salem, TN, India
Salem Tamil Nadu India
rkentomology@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Toxicology Laboratory
My research is concerned with the biochemical, molecular and proteomic study in the evolution of Insecticide resistance among mosquitoes and to identify novel molecules for insect control. My work includes molecular and proteomic analysis, in addition to understanding the gene expression pattern of detoxification enzymes. Mainly my research focuses on the role of cytochrome P450 and esterase genes in conferring insecticides resistance in mosquitoes and agricultural insects.
Mridula Gupta
CV
Department of Entomology
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Research Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
mridulagupta10@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
Presently, I am working as Research Fellow at Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station,Faridkot, Punjab, India. The prime focus of my research is to identify the vital targets/ genes in Bemisia tabaci, A. biguttulla biguttulla and Earias sp, which are amenable to RNAi. We are trying to target osomregulation in hemipeteran insect through downregulation of aquaporin, calcitonin like receptor and diuretic hormone (DH-31). In Earias sp our focus is on disruption of ecdysis and other vital physiological process such as vitellogensis. We are also trying to improve the efficiency of RNAi in hemipeteran and lepidopteran insects using nanoparticles (chitosan and carbon quantum
Abhijit Ghosal
Dr.
Plant Protection
Sasya Shyamala Farm Science Centre
SOUTH 24 PARGANAS WEST BENGAL India
ghosalabhijit87@gmail.com

Agricultural Entomology Insect Biotechnology
Elias Gazza
CV
Centro de Bioinvestigaciones
CIT-NOBA
Pergamino Buenos Aires Argentina
gazzaelias@gmail.com
Centro de Bioinvestigaciones
Reverse genetics in pest.
Jonas King
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, & Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Mississippi State MS USA
jonas.king@msstate.edu
kinglab
http://kinglab.bch.msstate.edu/research.html
Daniel Hasegawa
Research Molecular Biologist
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
Charleston SC USA
daniel.k.hasegawa@gmail.com

I am broadly interested in understanding the molecular and physiological processes that drive insect-virus relationships. I have joined the IGTRCN because I am interested in utilizing gene editing technologies to: 1) further understand insect-virus relationships that have agricultural importance; 2) develop translational tools for more effective and precise insect pest management practices.
Steve Young
School of Integrative Plant Science
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
sly27@cornell.edu

Invasive pests
Flávia Virginio Fonseca
Biologist, PhD. candidate
CV
Paarasitology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo Sao Paulo Brazil
fvfonsecaa@gmail.com

Scientific Dissemination, Scientific Diffusion, Science Popularization, Community Engagement, Public Engagement.
Dave Angelini
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Colby College
Waterville Maine United States
david.r.angelini@gmail.com

I am particularly interested in developmental genetic systems with alternative phenotypic outcomes, such as serially homologous, dimorphic and polyphenic traits. While my immediate research focuses on the mechanisms of these systems, my lab also uses a comparative approach to explore their evolution. Insect appendages are my most common study systems, where I use a combination of methods from functional genetics, morphometrics, endocrinology and genomics.
Rubina Chongtham
Botany
University of Delhi
Delhi Delhi India
chrubina1@yahoo.co.in

Aphids are important crop pests. Understanding plant-aphid interactions can give great insights into not only aphid biology, but also methods of crop-protection. My focus is on using transcriptomics and functional genomics in order to develop improved plant variety using RNAi.
Monika Gulia-Nuss
Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
RENO Nevada USA
mgulianuss@unr.edu
Vector Biology Lab
My research program investigates the fundamental questions related to vector biology and vector-parasite interactions. I am particularly interested in aspects of reproductive physiology, nutrient allocation, vector competence, and population genomics.
pradeep bhongale
AGROCHEMICALS AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY. KOLHAPUR
KOLHAPUR MAHARASTRA INDIA
pradeepbhongale1993@gmail.com

DNA BARCODING FOR PEST IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT
Alison Gerken
Post Doctoral Researcher
Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
USDA ARS
Manhattan Kansas United States
alison.gerken@ars.usda.gov

My research focus is on functional genomics of sensory systems in stored grain insect pests. I'm interested in the applied aspects of understanding what attracts insects to stored grain and how we can intercept them. I'm interested in the genetic variation underlying behavioral components associated with attraction to stored grain.
Christian Ogaugwu
Dr
Animal and Environmental Biology
Federal University Oye-Ekiti
Oye-Ekiti Ekiti State Nigeria
christian.ogaugwu@fuoye.edu.ng

Control of insect pests and disease vectors using molecular techniques. Functional insect genomics.
Kevin Vogel
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States
kjvogel@uga.edu
Strand Lab
My research focuses on mechanisms of mosquito development and reproduction. Specifically, I investigate mosquito reproductive endocrinology and mosquito-microbiome interactions.
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Thais Rodrigues
PhD
CV
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
thaisbarros.bio@gmail.com

RNAi technology applied to pest management
Sheng Yang
Dr.
CV
School of Biological & Biomedical Sciences
Durham University (UK)
Iowa State University (USA)
Ames Iowa USA
yunfeiyangaini@126.com
Post-doc Research Associate
(1) Bt toxin engineering for novel hemipteran gut target sites Bt toxins have been successfully used in various transgenic crops for almost 20 years to manage lepidopteran and coleopteran pests. However, this strategy has not been used in the management of aphids and other hemipterans due to their low susceptibility to Bt toxins, potentially arising from a lack of binding to the hemipteran gut. To circumvent this limitation in pea aphids, peach-potato aphids and soybean aphids, a phage display library was screened in vivo against the aphid guts to identify candidate gut-binding peptides to add to a Bt toxin. The in
Hemant Gujar
Graduate Student
Department of Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
hemantgujar@yahoo.com

Presently I am working on molting, metamorphosis and reproduction in bed bugs, Cimex lectularius. We use NGS technologies to find genes involved in these processes.
Richu Singla
Regional Station
Punjab Agricultural University, Regional Station, Faridkot
Faridkot Punjab India
richu@pau.edu

Insect Molecular Biology
Azza Elgendy
CV
Entomology Department
Faculty of Science, Cairo University
Giza Non-US/Non-Canadian Egypt
aelgendy@sci.cu.edu.eg

Medical entomology
Linlin Zhang
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University
ithaca New York United States
gemzhanglinlin@gmail.com
Reed Lab
butterfly color pattern mechanism and evolution
SONAI RAJAN THANGARAJ
Dr
Agricultural Entomology
Tamil Nadu Agriculture University
Coimbatore  Tamil Nadu  India
snraja_insect@yahoo.co.in
Molecular Ecology Lab, Department of Plant Biotechnology, Centre for Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Population genetics of stored grain insect pests and honey bees Transcriptome Analaysis
Murat Güler
P.hD. Student
Biology/Zoology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Campus Türkiye
muratgmbg@gmail.com
Cumsag
I earned my BSc degree from Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG) at the Cumhuriyet University. My research interests were shaped during this time. The MBG program have provided me with general theory and practice in the area of molecular biology. But my interest specially is focused on bioinformatics and evolutionary biology. At the same time I have started to work with Dr. Hasan H. BAŞIBÜYÜK, who is the head of the Molecular Systematic Research Group of Cumhuriyet University (for more info. cumsag.com). The research group works mainly on taxonomy, phylogeny, population genetics and mitogenome of sawflies (Symphyta: Hymenoptera).
Anyi Mazo-Vargas
PhD student
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY US
am2622@cornell.edu
Laboratory of evolution of animal color patterns
I work with wing color patterns in butterflies to answer questions related to the evolution of gene regulation and developmental re-patterning. In my project I am using a mix of old school methods as: in-situ hybridization, antibody stains, drug treatments; and new genomics techniques as: ATAC-seq, RNA-seq and CRISPR-Cas9.
Anne-Christine Auge
Junior Technician
Cellular and Molecular Medicine (CMM)
University of Ottawa
Ottawa Ontario Canada
aauge@uottawa.ca

I work in a new Drosophila melanogaster lab, studying the neurological and genetic bases of social and sexual behaviour in fruit flies.
Lien Thi Phuong Nguyen
Ph.D
CV
Insect Ecology Department
Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources
Hanoi Hanoi Vietnam
phuonglientit@gmail.com

My work is focusing on the inventory of hymenopterans and their ecology and behavior, especially wasps of the family Vespidae, bees of the family Apidae and ants of the family Formicidae, concentrating on the conservation of various areas within Vietnam such as limestone forest and mangrove forest.
Duverney Chaverra Rodriguez
PhD Candidate
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
State College Pennsylvania United States
ddc172@psu.edu
Jason Rasgon Lab
My research focuses in exploring and optimizing strategies to produce transgenic insects via maternal injection.
Karan Singh
PhD Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER) Mohali
Mohali Punjab India
karansinghlabana1984@gmail.com
Evolutionary Biology Lab
My broad area of research interest is evolutionary genetics and host-parasite interaction. My graduate work is mainly focused on how environmental stress shapes life history traits and underlying genetic mechanisms of increased cold stress resistance. Apart from my work on cold shock resistance, I have also focused on host-parasite interaction and I isolated a novel bacterial pathogen (Staphylococcus succinus) of D. melanogaster that is now being extensively used to study evolutionary ecology of immunity.
Kim Ferguson
PhD Candidate
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
kim.ferguson@wur.nl

I am an Early Stage Researcher (ESR) in the BINGO ITN, Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (www.bingo-itn.eu for more info). Right now I'm in the first stage of my PhD so I'm trying to discover as much as possible and learn techniques to help me in my project. I will work with a few different species, but the goal is to use NGS technology to explore the genetic variation in wild-caught and commercially reared populations of select biocontrol species. I will work with Trichogramma brassicae, Nesidiocoris tenuis, and Amblyseious swirskii (aka Typhlodromips swirskii). They
Giselle Garcia
Committee on Evolutionary Biology
University of Chicago
Chicago IL United States
giselleg@uchicago.edu
Schmidt-Ott Lab
We research the origins and evolution of early development in Diptera.
Rayssa Garcia
Genetic Resources and Biotechnologies
Embrapa
Brasília Distrito Federal Brasil
rayssaag@gmail.com
Plant Pest Molecular Interactions
The research group from the Laboratory Plant-Pest Molecular Interactions (LIMPPI – Embrapa - Cenargen, Brasília - Brazil) is currently working on the development of sustainable RNAi strategies to control crop insect pests. One axe of our research focuses on the relationship between the structure of the dsRNA, its ability to induce gene silencing and its resistance to nuclease activities. On another axe, we focused on the understanding of gene silencing in the insect induced by RNAi produced by the plant. Answering about how, when and at which intensity the dsRNA orchestrates gene silencing inside insect cells are questions that remain
Anna Gilles
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhône-Alpes France
anna.f.gilles@gmail.com

I am working on posterior development in the insect model Tribolium castaneum. In contrast to Drosophila, the abdominal segments of Tribolium develop from a posterior growth zone during embryogenesis in a process similar to vertebrate somitogenesis. My project aims to understand the cellular basis of this by characterizing cell behavior both by in vivo imaging experiments and by clonal analysis. While the posterior growth zone of short germ insects has been described as a proliferative tissue in the classical literature, recent studies and my own data point to cell rearrangement as the main cause of posterior elongation. I am currently
Yuemei Dong
Dr.
Dept of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
ydong3@jhu.edu

Vector biology, malaria control, mosquito innate immunity, vector-borne infectious diseases
Cory Gall
Ph.D. candidate
CV
Department of Veterinary Microbiology & Pathology
Washington State University
Pullman WA USA
gall.cory@gmail.com
Brayton lab
My research focus includes characterizing the bacterial microbiome of the Rocky Mountain wood tick, manipulating the microbiome in order to look at the role endosymbionts have in pathogen acquisition, as well as trying to correlate the changes in the microbiome over field generations with the tick’s variation in pathogen susceptibility.
Jennifer Baltzegar
NSF IGERT Fellow in Genetic Engineering and Society
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
jen_baltzegar@ncsu.edu
Gould Lab
I am broadly interested in studying the differences between populations and species via mechanisms of evolution and impacts of population change. I am particularly interested in studying the impacts genetic engineering technologies have on natural populations.
Christopher Cunningham
Ph.D.
Department of Genetics
University of Georgia, Athens
Athens GA USA
cbc83@uga.edu
Moore Laboratory
My research focuses on the genetic and hormonal control of complex social behavior, such as social dominance networks and parent-offspring interactions. My current model system is Nicrophorus vespilloides, a burying beetle (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicrophorus_vespilloides). I am particularly interested in the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides in these behaviors and their natural variation. I use many techniques to answer my questions of interest; including, bioinformatics, gene expression, and proteomic tools.
Kanapathy Gajapathy
Dr
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northernprovince Sri Lanka
gayan156@gmail.com
zoology laboratory; molecular biology laboratory in University of jaffna
Focusing on evolution and phylogeny of arthropods; specifically spiders and vector species among insects
Nathaniel Grubbs
Postdoctoral Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
npgrubbs@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
My primary research focus is on the characterization of the naturally occurring, selfish genetic element, Medea, in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Medea operates by killing any offspring of a heterozygous mother that do not inherit at least one copy from either parent, but how the element causes this lethality, or prevents it, is still unknown. Understanding this function could give us valuable insight into selfish genetic elements, and perhaps even enable us to use Medea as a stable gene-drive in other species. I am also working with others in the lab to help develop molecular tools for studying the
Nitin Gupta
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences and Bioengineering
Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur
Kanpur UP India
nitiniitk@gmail.com

I am interested in understanding the fundamental mechanisms used by neural circuits for processing information in deeper layers of the mosquito olfactory system (sense of smell). I am particularly interested in understanding the neural mechanisms by which specific odors become attractive or aversive to mosquitoes. I plan to use a variety of techniques, including in vivo electrophysiology (intracellular recordings), histology, behavioral observations, and computational modeling. I am looking to collaborate with researchers who have expertise in genetic manipulations of mosquitoes. I am also looking to hire post-docs and PhD students in my lab.
Honglin Feng
Graduate Student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
honglin@bio.miami.edu
The Wilson Lab
Insect/Bacteria symbiosis
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Andrea Gloria-Soria
Associate Research Scientist
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
andrea.gloria-soria@yale.edu
Powell Lab & Turner Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested on the behavioral genetics of feeding behavior in mosquitoes and its consequences for dengue transmission. I also conduct population genetic studies on Aedes aegypti mosquitos to understand historical and recent invasions.
Ethan Degner
Student
Entomology Department
Cornell University
Ithaca NY United States
ecd77@cornell.edu
Harrington Lab
I am broadly interested in the ecology of insect vectors of human disease. Specfically, I am interested in the reproductive biology of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.
Yong Zhang
Assistant Professor
Biology
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno NV U.S
yongzhang@unr.edu

Neurobiology, circadian clocks
Sarah Maguire
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Belle Mead NJ United States
smaguire@Princeton.edu

I am broadly interested in the biological basis of behavior – especially through neurogenetic and evolutionary perspectives. The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is an ideal model system to study the biological basis of behavior because its attraction to human hosts makes it the number one vector of yellow and Dengue fever, the latter of which affects an estimated 50 million people per year! The goal of my research is to 1) determine the molecular basis of Aedes’s attraction to humans as well as 2) map the neural circuitry underlying Aedes’s attraction and repulsion behavior.
Scott Geib
Research Entomologist
DKI-PBARC
USDA-ARS
Hilo Hawaii United States
scott.geib@ars.usda.gov

Genomics of Tephritid fruit flies. Whole genome sequencing, trait association, QTL, Linkage mapping, Functional Genomics, RNAi, CRISPR/CAS
Chris Jiggins
Professor
Department of Zoology
University of Cambridge
Cambridge UK United Kingdom
c.jiggins@zoo.cam.ac.uk
Chris Jiggins
Adaptation and speciation in butterflies, especially focussing on wing pattern development and evolution. Interested to develop transgenic tests of wing pattern developmental factors
Jacob Wenger
Ohio State Presidential Fellow
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
wenger.93@osu.edu

I am interested in the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing adaptation in pest insect populations, and how these mechanisms can be used to develop insect resistance management plans. My current work utilizes genomic analyses to clarify the inheritance and population dynamics of virulence to plant resistance in the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). I am also interested in the role of plasticity and endosymbionts in insect adaptation.
Dave Denlinger
CV
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
david.denlinger@aggiemail.usu.edu
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Wei Peng
Huazhong Agricultural University
College of Plant Science and Technology
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Insect Resource Application and Sustainable Pest Control and Institute of Urban and Horticultural Pests
Wuhan Hubei China
pengweijack@163.com
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Insect Resource Application and Sustainable Pest Control and Institute of Urban and Horticultural Pests
The molecular regulation of sex determination and female-specific lethality or embryonic conditional lethality in Bactrocera species 
Xianhui Wang
professor
CV
State Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Pest Insects and Rodents
Institute of Zoology
Beijing  Beijing  China
wangxh@ioz.ac.cn
Behavioral epigenetics
Insect epigenetics, behavioral plasticity, olfactory receptors
MARIA ELENI GRIGORIOU
Biochemistry- Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Larissa Greece
magrigoriou@bio.uth.gr
Marilena
Transcriptomic analysis of the reproductive system of Bactrocera oleae. Detection of molecules involved in reproduction.
Laura Harrington
Professor
Department of Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
lch27@cornell.edu
Harrington lab
Research in the Harrington lab focuses on mosquito vector ecology, biology, and behavior. Our goal is to understand basic (and often overlooked) aspects of mosquito biology in order to identify new targets for controlling mosquitoes and reducing transmission of vector-borne diseases.
Maureen Gorman
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
mgorman@ksu.edu

Iron metabolism is a vital biological process in all eukaryotic organisms, but the mechanisms of iron metabolism in insects are poorly understood. Our research is focused on iron transport and the relationship between iron metabolism and innate immunity in insects. We use a combination of genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry methods to study iron metabolism and innate immunity in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Manduca sexta, and Tribolium castaneum. These studies should lead to a better understanding of two fundamental components of insect physiology and, thus, provide information that can be used in future efforts to control insect
Bryony Bonning
Director, NSF I/UCRC
Department of Entomology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
bbonning@ufl.edu
Insect Management Technology
Molecular interactions between viruses and insects, and between microbe-derived insect toxins and their receptors. Fundamental knowledge of these interactions is then used to optimize current insect pest management strategies and to develop novel environmentally benign solutions.
Jingfei Huang
Dr.
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, College of Plant Protection
Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University
Fuzhou Fujian China
jfhuang@fafu.edu.cn

insect genome; insecticide resistance; programmed cell death
Shengzhang Dong
Ph.D
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public health
Baltimore MD USA
dongshzhang@gmail.com

Aedes mosquito-arbovirus interactions; Anopheles mosquito-Plasmodium parasite interactions; insect miRNAs; insect immunity; insect physiology and molecular biology.
Komal kumar Bollepogu Raja
student
Biochemistry and Molecular biology
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
kbollepo@mtu.edu

Studying complex color patterns in new model organisms
Huizhen Guo
Southwest University
The state key laboratory of silkworm genome biology
Chongqing Chongqing China
guohuizhen.111@163.com
the state key laboratory of silkworm genome biology
My major is biochemistry and molecular biology, and my research is mainly focus on the lepidoptera chemosensory gene families, especially Gr genes.
Susumu Hiragaki
PhD
Graduate School of Agricultural Science
Kobe University
Kobe Hyogo Japan
susumu.hiragaki@gmail.com

I am studying about 1) relationship between arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT)/melatonin and diurnal/seasonal physiology in insect, 2) development of new acaricide using unique GABA-receptor, and 3) regulatory mechanisms of insect endocrine system by Rab protein.
Simon Groen
PhD
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona
Tucson Arizona United States of America
scgroen@email.arizona.edu
Whiteman Lab
Plant-insect interactions
Ifeoma Ezugbo-Nwobi
Parasitology and Entomology
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka Anambra Nigeria
ifeomaezugbonwobi@yahoo.com
Parasitology and Entomology Research Lab
Focused on understanding vector-borne diseases like Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Dengue, Yellow fever, etc, so that better control measures can be developed. I seek to integrate traditional parasitological and entomological procedures with molecular genetics and bioinformatics-based technologies to deliver new insights into vector biology and ecology.
YF Wang
Professor
College of Life Sciences
Central China Normal University
Wuhan Hubei Province China
yfengw@hotmail.com
Animal development and immunity
Drosophila reproduction and development; Effect of Wolbachia infection on Insect reproduction and behavior
carole long
Chief, Malaria Immunology Section
Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research
NIAID/NIH
Rockville MD USA
clong@niaid.nih.gov
Malaria Immunology Section
Immunity to malaria parasites including sexuals stages Vaccine development Field studies in Mali Studies of sexual stages of malaria parasites in culture and in the mosquito Mosquito membrane feeding assays and blocking of transmission with drugs or vaccines
Mark Guillotte
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
University of Maryland Baltimore
Baltimore Maryland United States
mguil33@gmail.com

Vector-borne disease
Seth Donoughe
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
seth.donoughe@gmail.com

Insect development and evolution
Jonathan Wang
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
jonbwang@yahoo.com

I am working on projects that aim to identify genes playing a role in fungal susceptibility/resistance in Drosophila, elucidate fungal interactions, and genetically engineer fungus for agricultural applications.
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran
m.ghafourim@yahoo.com

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
Sufang Zhang
Assistant Professor
Forest Protection
Research Institute of Forest Ecology, Environment and Protection
Beijing Beijing China
zhangsf@caf.ac.cn

Forest insect olfactory mechanisms, Forest protection, Forest pest management
yongjun Zhang
PhD, Professor
Entomology
Institute of Plant Protection, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing Beijing China
yjzhang@ippcaas.cn

(1) chemical communication regulation between insect pests and host plant, (2) regulation of insect olfactory behaviour, (3) resistance of host plants to insect pests, and (4) bio-safety of GMOs
hongyu zhang
Dr Prof
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology, College of Plant Science and Technology
Huazhong Agricultural University
Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology
Wuhan Hubei China
2496398633@qq.com
Institute of Urban and Horticultural Entomology
Insect molecular and Microbiology, Control techniques of Urban and Horticultural insect pests, especially fruit fly etc citrus insect pests.
Zhou Qiang
Professor
State Key Laboratory of Biological Control
Sun Yat-sen University
Guangzhou  Guangdong P R China
lsszhou@mail.sysu.edu.cn
Insect-Plant biololgy
The effect of rice nutrtion on the reproduction and development of insect
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
Heiko Vogel
Dr.
Department of Entomology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thuringia Germany
hvogel@ice.mpg.de
Research Group Leader
Insect Genomics; Innate Immunity; Molecular Evolution; Plant-Insect Interactions; Detoxification; Insect adaptation to extreme ecological niches.
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
LALITA GUPTA
Associate Professor
Department of Biological Sciences
Birla Institute of Technology & Science- Pilani
Pilani Rajasthan INDIA
lalitagupta@yahoo.com
Laboratory of Molecular Parasitology and Vector Biology
Mosquito Immunity. Host-Parasite Interaction
Ashok Giri
Sr. Scientist
CV
Biochemical Sciences
CSIR-National Chemical Laboratory
Pune Maharashatra India
ap.giri@ncl.res.in
Plant Molecular Biology Unit
Plant defence mechanisms: We developed group at CSIR-NCL focusing on agricultural biotechnology of high relevance to the current problems. Insect pests are globally severe threat to agriculture where we addressed questions related to molecular insights of plant-insect interactions. Understanding of the plant-insect interaction at molecular level will serve as basis for developing strategies for plant protection in sustainable manner with minimizing use of chemicals. Detoxification mechanisms in insects: To obtain molecular insights in to detoxification mechanisms in Lepidopteran insect pest, Helicoverpa armigera, we are employing "omics" approaches upon exposure of insect to different phytochemicals and insecticide molecules.
Rob Good
Genetics
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
rtgood@unimelb.edu.au
Robin
Genomics of Drosophila, Aphids,Molluscs RNAi studies of Aphids and molluscs Developing software tools.
Ludvik Gomulski
Department of Biology and Biotechnology
University of Pavia
Pavia PV Italy
gomulski@unipv.it
Genetics and genomics of insects of economic and medical importance
We are using transcriptome data to analyze the molecular changes that accompany major physiological and behavioral changes such as maturation and mating in different insect species of medical and agricultural importance. We are particularly interested in transcriptional changes in olfactory related genes.
Dimitrios Kontogiannatos
Dr.
CV
Biotechnology Department
Agricultural University of Athens
Athens Attika Greece
dim_kontogiannatos@yahoo.gr

I am studying the use of RNAi technology in several aspects of Insect Science, like functional genomics, endocrinology and pest management (Baculovirus, bacterial-mediated dsRNA delivery and direct transfer of dsRNAs) in the Lepidopteran species Sesamia nonagrioides.  I am also working with insect cell lines and baculovirus technology in order to express and biochemically characterize important developmental genes of several insect pests. 
Jie Hung, Patricia King
Dr.
Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Universiti Putra Malaysia
Bintulu, Sarawak Not Applicable Malaysia
patriciaking1127@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
Termite digestome: unravelling its enzymes repertoires and secondary metabolites through metatranscriptomes and proteomic analysis; and investigate its gut microbiota using metagenomics approach
Maarten Jongsma
Dr
Business Unit Bioscience
Plant Research International, Wageningen University and Research Center
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
maarten.jongsma@wur.nl
High throughput phenotyping plant resistance to insects
I am involved both in studies of insect behaviour on plants using videotracking technology and highly parallel arena plates as well as in GPCR olfactory and taste receptor studies based on a new microfluidic platform
Rocio Ng
Ecology and Evolution
Stony Brook University
Stony Brook New York United States
rocio.s.ng@gmail.com

My thesis work involves investigating the phenotypic evolution of pigmentation traits in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Pigmentation is the most striking feature of many organisms and often exhibit high levels of diversity within and between species. In addition, pigmentation may play a role in multiple adaptations and be subject to diverse selection pressures. For my dissertation, I am employing a candidate gene approach to illuminate how the melanin pathway genes pale and ebony may be contributing to variation in pigmentation traits in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster in the United States. The pale gene
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Denis Tagu
Senior Scientist
IGEPP
INRA Rennes
BP 35327 Le Rheu Bretagne FRANCE
denis.tagu@rennes.inra.fr
Institute of Genetics, Environment and Plant Protection
Genomics, arthropods, bioinformatics, gene network, phenotypic plasticity
Don Champagne
Associate Professor
Entomology/Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases
University of Georgia
Athens Georgia USA
dchampa@uga.edu
Champagne Lab
I am interested in characterizing salivary factors that facilitate blood feeding by arthropods. More specifically, I am interested in proteins and peptides that modulate vertebrate hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses.
Paul Eggleston
Prof.
Life Sciences
Keele University
Keele Staffs. UK
p.eggleston@keele.ac.uk
Molecular Entomology
My research interests are in molecular entomology, particularly the molecular genetics of mosquitoes that transmit human disease and their complex interactions with the parasites and viruses that cause disease. Because of their medical importance, the focus of my group is on the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Current projects include the development of technologies for genetic engineering of mosquitoes, the creation of genetically modified mosquitoes that are compromised in their ability to transmit disease and the development of strategies for stage- and tissue-specific gene expression within genetically modified mosquitoes. My research has attracted
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Kasim George
Post doctoral fellow
Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Maryland College Park
Institute for Bioscience & Biotechnology Research
Rockville Maryland USA
kigeorge@umd.edu
O'Brochta Group IBBR
My research interest focuses on host-pathogen interaction. Specifically, I am investigating the interaction of the human malaria pathogen, Plasmodium falciparum and the arthropod vector Anopheles stephensi. Using transgenic technology, I aim to modify to innate immune system of A. stephensi, to increase the intensity of P. falciparum infection for live attenuated sporozoites vaccine development.
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Kevin Nyberg
Biology
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park MD USA
kevingnyberg@gmail.com

I am currently researching the expression and evolution of long noncoding RNAs in the genus Drosophila.
Nicole Gerardo
Assistant Professor
Biology
Emory University
Atlanta GA - Georgia United States
nicole.gerardo@emory.edu
The Gerardo Lab
Our lab's focus is on the evolutionary ecology of interactions between microbes and hosts. We are interested in how both beneficial and harmful microbes establish and maintain relationships with their hosts. Such associations are shaped by ecological limitations on host range, evolutionary trade-offs for both hosts and microbes, and host immunology. We combine genomics, phylogenetics and experimental approaches to study these forces in diverse insect-microbe systems.
Jennifer Gleason
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS USA
jgleason@ku.edu

My lab focuses on the genetics of behavior, primarily in Drosophila. We are interested in the genetic changes resulting in behavioral isolation between species. To that end, we study courtship behaviors, primarily acoustic signals (courtship song) and pheromones.
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón
VectorBase Scientific Liaison/Outreach Manager
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
ggiraldo@nd.edu
VectorBase
I teach scientist at all career stages, students, postdocs, technicians, researchers, and faculty, how to use VectorBase data, tools and resources. I also teach how to manually annotate genes to submit them in VectorBase, we currently use Artemis but will soon host WebApollo too. Our developers are currently working on VectorBase Galaxy, soon will be teaching how to use it too.
Juergen Gadau
Professor
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe AZ United States of America
jgadau@asu.edu
Gadau Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics of solitary and social Hymenoptera
Shin Goto
Associate Professor
Graduate School of Science
Osaka City University
Osaka Osaka Japan
shingoto@sci.osaka-cu.ac.jp

Molecular mechanisms of Insect environmental adaptation.
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA
adingwall@luc.edu

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Haobo Jiang
Professor
CV
Entomology and Plant Pathology
Oklahoma State University
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
haobo.jiang@okstate.edu
Insect Molecular Biology Lab
1. Extracellular serine protease network in Manduca sexta; 2. Prophenoloxidase structure, function, activation, and regulation by serpins; 3. Insect genome, transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and microRNA studies; 4. Other aspects of insect immunity including pathogen recognition, signal transduction, antimicrobial effectors, cellular responses, and so on. ,
Dr. Christina Grozinger
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
College of Agricultural Sciences
University Park PA United States
cmgrozinger@psu.edu
Grozinger Lab
My program seamlessly integrates research, education, outreach and service related to the biology and health of honey bees and other pollinators.  My research addresses both basic and applied questions, using a highly trans-disciplinary approach encompassing genomics, physiology, neurobiology, behavior, and chemical ecology.  My program consists of two main areas of study, which examine the mechanisms underlying social behavior and health in honey bees and related species.  Our studies on social behavior seek to elucidate the proximate and ultimate mechanisms that regulate complex chemical communication systems in insect societies.  Our studies on honey bee health examine how biotic and abiotic stressors
Dr. Angela Douglas
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
aes326@cornell.edu
Douglas Lab
All animals are multi-organismal: they are chronically infected by beneficial microorganisms. We study the interaction between animal function and the diversity and activities of resident microorganisms.