Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Adriana Adolfi
Postdoc
Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
University of California Irvine
Irvine California United States
adriana.adolfi@uci.edu
James Lab
Gene drives for population replacement in the malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi
OLUSOLA SOKEFUN
Dr
Genetics / Bioinformatics
Lagos State University, Faculty of Science, Ojo
Lagos Lagos Nigeria
osokefun@gmail.com
Genetics / Bioinformatics Lab
Phylogeny, Barcoding, Population Genetics
Chrystophe Ferreira
coodinator
anmal facilities
Paris Descartes University
Paris ile de France France
chrystophe.ferreira@parisdescartes.fr

trangenesis, mice models of human diseases
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Flávia Virginio Fonseca
Biologist, PhD. candidate
CV
Paarasitology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo Sao Paulo Brazil
fvfonsecaa@gmail.com

Scientific Dissemination, Scientific Diffusion, Science Popularization, Community Engagement, Public Engagement.
Ali Afify
CV
Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins Medical School
Baltimore Maryland USA
ali.afify@jhmi.edu

I am currently investigating the response profile of Anopheles gambiae to pheromones and repellents both at the receptor and glomerulus level.
Richard Fandino
Dr.
Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thueringen Germany
rfandino@ice.mpg.de

My interest is mainly focused on the evolution of gene regulation and expression in chemosensory genes and the role these play in odor-guided behavior of insects. My post-doctoral studies are focused on establishing the ecological model, the sphinx moth, Manduca sexta as a feasible molecular model for receptor / odorant interactions.
Imran Rauf
Senior Scientist
Agriculture biotechnology Division
National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
juniper_786@hotmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology Lab
My research is focus on RNA interference. I am working to develop insect resistant plants by using RNAi and other insecticidal technologies.
Kim Ferguson
PhD Candidate
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
kim.ferguson@wur.nl

I am an Early Stage Researcher (ESR) in the BINGO ITN, Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (www.bingo-itn.eu for more info). Right now I'm in the first stage of my PhD so I'm trying to discover as much as possible and learn techniques to help me in my project. I will work with a few different species, but the goal is to use NGS technology to explore the genetic variation in wild-caught and commercially reared populations of select biocontrol species. I will work with Trichogramma brassicae, Nesidiocoris tenuis, and Amblyseious swirskii (aka Typhlodromips swirskii). They
Joshua Fisher
Invasive Species Biologist
Ecological Services
US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior
Honolulu Hawaii US
joshua_fisher@fws.gov

Vector Control, Avian Malaria
Val Saffer
Administrative Assistant
Dr. David O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Rockville MD USA
safferv@ibbr.umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
None.
Megan Fritz
Post-doctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology, Program in Genetics
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
mlfritz@ncsu.edu

I am broadly interested in the evolutionary responses of insects to their constantly changing environment. Humans are an important source of this change, often imposing strong selection on insect populations through management practices. My current research explores how the genomes of Lepidopteran agricultural pests respond to selection imposed by transgenic crops.
Ferdinand NANFACK MINKEU
Mr
Parasitology and Mycology
Pasteur
Paris Paris 15 France
nanleplot@yahoo.fr

My researches are focused on host-pathogen interactions in African malaria mosquito. Transgenic tools to fight malaria Modification of Tribolium castaneum and Sitophilus oryzae for SIT control
Honglin Feng
Graduate Student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
honglin@bio.miami.edu
The Wilson Lab
Insect/Bacteria symbiosis
Dina Fonseca
Professor
Entomology; Ecology&Evolution, Public Health
Rutgers University
Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics, Smithsonian
New Brunswick NJ USA
dinafons@rci.rutgers.edu
Fonseca
My primary research interests are the evolution, prevention, and control of invasive mosquitoes, the principal vectors of significant disease epizootics and epidemics. Our results indicate that populations differ in vectorial capacity over space and time, profoundly affecting epidemiological landscapes and risk estimates. Rapid evolution in invasive mosquito vectors is a good model for the effects of Global Climate Change on disease epidemiology.
Michalis Averof
IGFL
CNRS
Lyon Rhone France
michalis.averof@ens-lyon.fr

Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Mary Chaffee
Graduate Student
CV
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY USA
mary.chaffee@rochester.edu

My research is focused on studying the molecular basis of the wing polyphenism is pea aphids.
Diana Cox-Foster
Professor
Entomology
Penn State
Univ. Park PA USA
dxc12@psu.edu
Cox-Foster Lab
My Lab is interested in host/pathogen interactions. We are interested in genes associated with the immune system and cuticular exoskeleton (biosynthesis and molting). We are interested in immune responses to viruses, and responses to parasites such as nematodes and varroa mites. In particular, the anti-viral immune responses are of interest, going from point of infection to death of the insect host.
Isidoro Feliciello
Dr.
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery
University of Naples Federico II
Napoli NA Italy
ifelicie@unina.it
Laboratory of Experimental Biology
Satellite DNAs of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum: roles in genome dynamic and gene expression.
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran
m.ghafourim@yahoo.com

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
yosra khalfallah
PhD student
Biology
university of Tunis el manar
Djerba Medenine Tunisia
yosra_khalfallah0607@yahoo.fr
génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures à intéret agronomique
microRNAs implicate in plant pathogen interactions
Elsayed Hafez
Professor
CV
Plant Protection and Biomolecular Diagnosis
City for Scientific Research and technology applications, Arid lands cultivation research institute
Alexandria Alexandria  Egypt
elsayed_hafez@yahoo.com
Molecular Biology Lab
we are interested in studying of the honey bee genome (Egyptian strain).
Guido Favia
Professor
CV
School of Biosciences and Veterinary Medicine
University of Camerino
Camerino Macerata Italy
guido.favia@unicam.it
Molecular Parasitology
Recent advances in the knowledge of anophelines biology make possible new strategies to control malaria by genetically modifying the mosquito to reduce its vectorial competence. However, one crucial aspect of this approach is how to introduce into wild mosquito populations the appropriate effector transgenes, which are able to interfere with parasite development. We will explore an alternative method to introduce effector genes into mosquitoes, via the microbiota hosted in its midgut lumen, i.e. rather than by genetically modifying mosquitoes, by modifying bacteria that inhabit the mosquito midgut. We have recently identified bacteria (Asaia) and yeasts (Pichia), inhabiting the midgut and
Thomas Flatt
SNF Professor
CV
Department of Ecology and Evolution
University of Lausanne, Switzerland
Lausanne Vaud Switzerland
thomas.flatt@unil.ch
Evolution and Mechanisms of Life History
I study the evolution and mechanisms of life history and aging, mostly by applying population and functional genomics approaches (next-generation sequencing, population genomics) to natural (e.g., clinal) and laboratory (e.g., artificial selection and experimental evolution) populations of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) which are phenotypically differentiated for life history. I am particulary interested in using genomic approaches to identify candidate genes and alleles likely shaped by selection and then to test these candidates for effects upon life history by using functional genetics (e.g., RNAi, synthetic recombinant populations, and gene editing methods such as CRISPR/Cas-9). Currently, we are applying this toolbox
Alexander Franz
Dr.
Dept. of Veterinary Pathobiology
University of Missouri
Columbia  Missouri USA
franza@missouri.edu

Arbovirus-mosquito interactions; identification of genes/pathways in mosquitoes determining vector competence for arboviruses; interrupting arbovirus disease cycle in Aedes aegypti
Alimorad Sarafrazi
Dr
CV
Insect Taxonomy Research Department
Iranian Research Institute of Plant Protection
Tehran Tehran/Asia Iran
asarafrazi@yahoo.com
Heteroptera
I'm working on the taxoxnomy of Heteroptera based on morphological and molecular characters. I have also working on the population Genetics of these taxa. Recently I have conducted some works on phyloclimatics of Heteroptera combining the genetic structure and distribution modeling
Ada Rafaeli
Associate Director , Prof.
Academic Affairs and International Cooperation
Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center
Bet Dagan NONE ISRAEL
vtada@volcani.agri.gov.il
Insect Physiology Lab, Department of food quality and safety
Physiological, biochemical and molecular regulatory mechanisms of insect reproductive behavior, particularly in lepidopterans
Lucy Firth
Dr
Invertebrate Genetics
Syngenta
Bracknell Berkshire UK
lucy.firth@syngenta.com
Dr. Lucy C. Firth
Drosophila genetic technologies to uncover and understand insecticidal mode of action targets and resistance. Comparative genomics of agronomic pest species.
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes
Associate Professor
Entomology and Plant Pathology
University of Tennessee
Knoxville TN USA
jurat@utk.edu

Our research is focused on the physiology of the insect gut, particularly the molecular characterization of interactions between the gut epithelium and insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the identification of novel enzymes for biofuel production, and the characterization of the gut regenerative response after pathogenic attack.
Badrul Arefin
Molecular Biosciences
Stockholm University
Stockholm   Sweden
badrul.arefin@su.se
Ulrich Theopold
I am interested in to understand the molecular and the cellular mechanisms involved in the response against nematode infections in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am working on insect immunity, particularly Drosophila immunity towards entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN). Until now, our knowledge on Drosophila immunity mostly comes from studies of bacterial and fungal infections. However, nematode parasites are considered one the biggest threats to human health, causing diseases leading to death. Even when they are not killing, they could stay in the host and cause chronic diseases. Lymphatic filariasis is such an example which is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti (filarial nematode).
Marc Halfon
Associate Professor
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
mshalfon@buffalo.edu

My laboratory maintains an active research program divided between Drosophila molecular genetics and computational/bioinformatics. Current research in the laboratory falls into three main areas: (a) discovery and characterization of transcriptional cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in Drosophila and other holometabolous insects, (b) promoter-CRM interactions, and (c) mechanisms of specificity for receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, with a focus on mesoderm development. I am also the developer and curator of the REDfly database of Drosophila transcriptional regulatory elements and as such am active in the field of genome annotation and in providing community-accessible database resources.
Dr. Thomas Kaufman
Distinguished Professor of Biology
faculty
Department of Biology
Indiana University Bloomington
Bloomington IN USA
kaufman@indiana.edu
Kaufman Lab
Using the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the long-term goal of our laboratory is to contribute to an understanding of the genetic basis of the developmental program of higher organisms. The homeotic genes, which play a crucial role in development, have been our principal locus. Our research areas include chromatin, chromosomes, and genome integrity; developmental mechanisms and regulation in eukaryotic systems; and eukaryotic cell biology, cytoskeleton and signaling.