Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Sethuraman Veeran
Department of Insect Toxicology
South China Agricultural University
Guangzhou Guangdong China
sethuramanbio@gmail.com

Working on Autophagy, Apoptosis cell death and cell signaling pathways mechanisms in Lepidopteron insect In-vivo and In-vitro. I am also interested and working in understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the process of Nucleophagy, my findings demonstrate for the first time “Nucleophagy or Nuclear Autophagy” in insect cell. Insect virus host interactions, isolations of new baculoviruses (NPV and Gv) and Entomopox viruses for biological control. Enhancing the effectiveness of nucleopolyhedroviruses through incorporation of enhancing inclusion proteins by midgut damage and other mechanisms.
Kevin Deem
Mr.
Biology
Miami University
Oxford Ohio United States
deemkd@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu Lab
Because of a large gap in the fossil record, a debate on the origin of insect wings has roared on for more than 200 years between two competing hypotheses: tergal or pleural origin. Recent molecular evidence has provided support for a dual-origin of insect wings. I aim to investigate the contribution of two distinct wing serial homologs to ectopic wing formation in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, to further inform the dual-origin hypothesis of insect wings. Tribolium castaneum is an emerging model system which has been shown to bare two distinct wing serial homologs on the wingless first thoracic
Maciej Maselko
Biotechnology Institute
University of Minnesota
St. Paul MN USA
mmaselko@umn.edu

I am developing Synthetic Incompatibility; an approach for engineering species-like barriers in sexually reproductive organisms. Synthetic Incompatibility has applications for transgene biocontainment in plants engineered to produce high-value compounds and for controlling pest species such as mosquitoes and invasive fish.
Lucia Proietti
CV
Zoology
Central University of Venezuela
Hialeah  Florida USA
proietti.dempaire@gmail.com

In my bachelor degree ( from Central University of Venezuela): I worked with Trypanosoma evansi and then I got some ability in trypanosomes diagnosis by PCR and supported the experiments about recombinant protein between T vivax cysteine protease and HSP70. In my PhD (from Ferrara University, Italy): I worked with T brucei 6PGDH. I studied:
Isabella Schember
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
ilschemb@buffalo.edu
Halfon Lab, PhD candidate
I am currently a PhD candidate and I am interested in studying gene regulatory network evolution and regulatory genomics of various insects.
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
Kaylen Brzezinski
Department of Biology
Carleton University
Ottawa Ontario Canada
kaylenbrzezinski@cmail.carleton.ca
MacMillan Lab
My research focuses on how temperature (mainly cold stress) affects paracellular barrier permeability in gut epithelia.
Andrew Guinness
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
aguinnes@nd.edu

Broadly, I am interested in molecular signalling and transgenic targets in insect vectors, most specifically applied to mosquitoes.
Courtney Clark-Hachtel
Doctoral Candidate
CV
Department of Biology
Miami Univerisity
Oxford OH United States
clarkcm6@miamioh.edu

Studying the evolutionary origin of the novel insect wing using various arthropods.
Ayman Ahmed
Mr
CV
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM)
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
zoologist05@gmail.com
Vector behaviour and genomics
Mosquito Population genetics and Mosquito-borne Viral Diseases.
Oliver Siehler
Dept. of Ecology, Evolution & Behavior
The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Sciences Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
oliver.siehler@gmx.de

Social and Neuroanatomical aspects of social entrainment
Katharina Wyschetzki
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking London UK
katharina.wyschetzki@gmail.com

The aim of my research is to make mosquitoes less able to transmit arboviruses.
Dylan Shropshire
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN United States
dylan.shropshire@vanderbilt.edu

Endosymbiont genetics
Rocio Elisa Yanes Ruano
CV
MOSCAMED
Guatemala Department of Agriculture
San Miguel Petapa Guatemala Guatemala
reyr66@gmail.com
San miguel Petapa Facilities
Anastrepha Ludens Ceratitis Capitata
Jennina Taylor-Wells
Research Scientist
Research and Development
Oxitec Ltd
Abingdon Oxfordshire England, United Kingdom
jennina.taylor-wells@oxitec.com
Oxitec Ltd
My research focus encompasses the design and creation of transgenic mosquitoes for novel vector control strategies. I am interested in novel molecular biology developments for the improved design of plasmids for insect transformation, research developments in transformation efficiency and new technologies relating to insect mass rearing.
Ewald Große-Wilde
Evolutionary Neuroethology
MPI for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thüringen Germany
ewald.grosse.wilde@gmail.com

Arthropod chemosensation.
Matthew Edgington
Dr
Artropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
matt.edgington@pirbright.ac.uk

Mainly working on mathematical modelling of engineered underdominance gene drive systems in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes but also some other classes of gene drive.
David Dolezel
Instiute of Entomology
Biology Center
Ceske Budejovice Czech Republic Czech Republic
david.dolezel@entu.cas.cz

In our group we are mainly interested in understanding insect seasonality – diapause; architecture of photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), geographic variability of the photoperiodic timer, Juvenile hormone signaling in reproduction of insects. The classical genetic models, such as D. melanogaster, display only poor photoperiodic response. Therefore we are trying to "bring" genetic tools to insect species with robust seasonal response. Our favorite organism is the linden bug (fire bug), Pyrrhocoris apterus. In this species we are mainly in terested in: endocrinology (neuropeptides, evolution of neuropeptide receptors), reproductive behavior, circadian clock, phylogeography of P. apterus and its adaptation.
Kathryn Weglarz
Biology
Utah State University
Logan UT USA
kathryn.weglarz@usu.edu

I study genome evolution in insect symbionts.
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Mamidala Praveen
Associate Professor
CV
Biotechnology
Telangana University
Nizamabad Telangana India
pmamidala@gmail.com
Laboratory of Functional Genomics
Functional genomics in non-model organisms
brian weiss
Research Scientist/Scholar and Lecturer
Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases
Yale School of Public Health
New Haven CT USA
brian.weiss@yale.edu

My research focuses on deciphering the interactions between arthropod disease vectors and the microorganisms they house. Specifically, I work with the tsetse flies, which vector African trypanosomes. These parasites are the causative agents of human and animal African trypanosomiases in sub-saharan Africa. Tsetse also harbor a community of symbiotic (maternally transmitted) and transient (environmentally acquired) bacteria that modulate many aspects of their host's physiology. I am interested in learning how tsetse's microbiota 1) regulates the development and function of the fly's immune system, and 2) can be harnessed to reduce the fly's ability to transmit trypanosomes.
OLUSOLA SOKEFUN
Dr
Genetics / Bioinformatics
Lagos State University, Faculty of Science, Ojo
Lagos Lagos Nigeria
osokefun@gmail.com
Genetics / Bioinformatics Lab
Phylogeny, Barcoding, Population Genetics
Neal Dittmer
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
ndittmer@ksu.edu

I’m interested in exploring how insects make their cuticle (exoskeleton). My main focus is on the proteins present in the cuticle and how they differ between cuticle that is hard versus cuticle that is flexible. I am also interested on how these cuticular proteins may be cross-linked together to help stabilize the cuticle (a process known as sclerotization). One important enzyme in this process is laccase, a member of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family. Many insects have multiple MCO genes and their physiological functions are unknown but likely extend beyond sclerotization. Understanding how the insect cuticle is made may lead
Shavonn Whiten
Doctoral Student | Graduate Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas United States
shavonnw@tamu.edu

My doctoral research seeks to identify and characterize adult Aedes aegypti midgut peritrophic matrix heme-binding proteins that may serve as novel targets for molecular based vector and vector-borne disease control.
ikbal agah ince
School of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology
ACIBADEM UNIVERSITY
İstanbul Atasehir TURKEY
agah.ince@acibadem.edu.tr
INCE Research Group / MBT / EPIMARK
I focus on understanding of the complexity of microbe-host interactions applying system biology approaches to provide the scientific basis for the development of novel bio-strategies and designing of bio-processes of products of a wide spectrum of interest in bio-industry. Fundamental/Applied Research Lines; - Detection of pathogen signals in complex biological samples using well established model organisms (in Human, Drosophila, Tsetse, Mosquito. - Manipulation of the host (vector) microbiota to block transmission of pathogens.
Richard Baxter
Assistant Professor
Chemistry
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
richard.baxter@yale.edu
Baxterlab
Current research within my laboratory includes the innate immune system of insect disease vectors, inhibitors of insect transglutaminases, and structural approaches for the design of novel peptide scaffolds and catalysts.
Jaeho Lee
Dept. of Agricultural Biotechnology
Seoul National University
Seoul Seoul Republic of Korea
lucanus@snu.ac.kr
Lab of Molecular Entomology and Toxicology
RNAi, pesticide, transgenesis
Ibrahim Elsheshney
Lecturer (Assistant Professor) of Economic Entomology
Plant Protection (Economic Entomology)
Tanta University, Egypt
Tanta Gharbeya Egypt
ishento@yahoo.com

• Investigating innovative methods of insect pest control such as CRISPR, RNAi, Bt … etc. • Studying insect physiology, molecular biology, and biochemistry in -omics levels. • Exploring insect resistance, immunological and development. • Understanding Ecological and multi-trophic interactions (plant-pathogen-insect-symbionts-natural enemies) in the ecosystem and microbial Ecology of insects. • IPM and Biological control of Horticulture and vegetable Insect Pests • Nanotechnology applications in pest control
Alexander Piper
Research Scientist
Invertebrates and Weed Sciences
Agriculture Victoria Research
Bundoora VIC Australia
alexander.piper@ecodev.vic.gov.au
Chemical Ecology lab
My research focusses on fungal symbionts of pest insects and how microbial volatiles can mediate insect behaviour
Silvia Lanzavecchia
Doctor in Science
CV
Genetics Institute
National Institute of Agricultural Technology (INTA)
HURLINGHAM BUENOS AIRES ARGENTINA
lanzavecchia.silvia@inta.gob.ar
LABORATORIO DE GENETICA DE INSECTOS DE IMPORTANCIA ECONÓMICA
Our scientific lines of research are focused on insect genetics, population genetics, application of molecular markers and the study of genes involved in physiological and behavioral processes. Our activities are associated to the development of environmentally-friendly control strategies against the most economically important insect pests and molecular characterization of beneficial insects.
Andrew Legan
PhD student
Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University
Ithaca New York United States
awl75@cornell.edu
Sheehan Lab
I am interested in major evolutionary transitions in individuality, such as the evolution of eusociality. As a graduate student, I study the primitively eusocial wasp genus Polistes, and I aim to describe the neurobiological and genomic mechanisms of chemosensation and their relevance to communication. By using a functional genetic approach in multiple paper wasp species, I hope to alter the production and perception of chemical signals in order to shed light on the function of chemical communication in social recognition, mating, and development.
Maria Kupper
Doctor of Science
CV
Chair of Microbiology
University of Wuerzburg
Wuerzburg Bavaria Germany
maria.kupper@freenet.de

My previous work as a doctoral researcher focussed on the involvement of the Camponotus floridanus immune system in the regulation and tolerance of its bacterial endosymbiont Blochmannia floridanus. I investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic responses of the ants upon immune challenge to provide an overview about ant immune factors. I also analysed differences in immune gene expression between endosymbiont bearing tissues and bacteria-free body parts to understand the role of the immune system in symbiont regulation. The results of the expression analysis revealed low expression levels of genes involved in immune signalling, and in addition the high expression of negative
Chrystophe Ferreira
coodinator
anmal facilities
Paris Descartes University
Paris ile de France France
chrystophe.ferreira@parisdescartes.fr

trangenesis, mice models of human diseases
Joseph Parker
Genetics and Development
Columbia University
New York NY United States
dibasic@gmail.com
Joe Parker
I study myrmecophilous rove beetles as a model for understanding the evolution and mechanistic basis of interspecies interactions. My aim is to develop certain species as laboratory models for deciphering the genetic and neurobiological basis of their symbioses with social insects.
Jared Koler
Biotechnology
University of Nevada Reno
Reno nv United States
jkoler@nevada.unr.edu
Gulia-Nuss
Lymphatic filariasis (LF), commonly known as elephantiasis, is a neglected tropical disease caused by parasitic filarial worms which are spread by infected mosquitoes taking blood meals required for egg maturation. More than 120 million people in ~70 countries are infected with LF. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) considers LF a priority in the ‘CDC winnable battles’ to eliminate LF from the Americas. Although drug therapy and mosquito control programs provide adequate control of LF, there are as yet no promising strategies on the horizon for the rise of drug and insecticide resistance in the worm
Travis van Warmerdam
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entemology and Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS United States
tcv34@msstate.edu
King Lab
I am interested in developing transgenic methods for the manipulation of invertebrate genomes. I am currently developing a gene drive plasmid in a Coleopteran species.
Samuel Arsenault
Mr.
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States of America
sva@uga.edu
Brendan G. Hunt: Evolutionary Insect Genetics Lab
My research focusses on understanding the genetic and epigenetic underpinnings of social polymorphism in the fire ant Solenopsis invicta. We seek to understand which genetic and behavioral cues maintain the colony structures of these organisms in their North American range. Additionally, we implement a phylogenetics-based approach for understanding the evolution of epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in Hymenoptera.
M’hamed El Mokhefi
Dr
Pre-Clinical
Ecole Nationale Superieure Veterinaire El Harrach
Algiers Algiers ALGERIA
elmokhefimhamed@yahoo.fr

Forest insects morphology, ecology and gentics. Response and adaptation of forest insects to climate change.
Timothy Ajiboye
Mr
Field Genebank
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology(NACGRAB), Moor Plantation, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo state Nigeria
ajiboyefemi2002@yahoo.com
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology
Molecular Characterization of Cereal stem borers. Control of cereal stemborers using host plant resistance. Conservation of Insects, Tree crops, and other Field genetic Resources.
Wiem BEN AMARA
Biology
Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar
Tunis El Manar Tunisia
wiem.benamara7@gmail.com
Unité de recherche de génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures
study of transposable elements in insects
Karen Kemirembe
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
kuk195@psu.edu
Rasgon Lab
Investigating how Wolbachia pipientis affects mosquito susceptibility to mosquito viruses.
Daniel Hasegawa
Research Molecular Biologist
U.S. Department of Agriculture
U.S. Vegetable Laboratory
Charleston SC USA
daniel.k.hasegawa@gmail.com

I am broadly interested in understanding the molecular and physiological processes that drive insect-virus relationships. I have joined the IGTRCN because I am interested in utilizing gene editing technologies to: 1) further understand insect-virus relationships that have agricultural importance; 2) develop translational tools for more effective and precise insect pest management practices.
AKASHATA DAWANE
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
GBPUAT PANTNAGAR
NAGPUR MAHARASHTRA INDIA
dawaneakshata@gmail.com

I AM NOT DOING RESEARCH YET BUT VERY INTERESTED IN ENTOMOLOGY AND INSECT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND LOOK FORWARD TO BE A PART OF IT
Pratima Chennuri
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX USA
pratima.chennuri@live.co.uk

Gene Drives.
Flávia Virginio Fonseca
Biologist, PhD. candidate
CV
Paarasitology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo Sao Paulo Brazil
fvfonsecaa@gmail.com

Scientific Dissemination, Scientific Diffusion, Science Popularization, Community Engagement, Public Engagement.
Dave Angelini
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Colby College
Waterville Maine United States
david.r.angelini@gmail.com

I am particularly interested in developmental genetic systems with alternative phenotypic outcomes, such as serially homologous, dimorphic and polyphenic traits. While my immediate research focuses on the mechanisms of these systems, my lab also uses a comparative approach to explore their evolution. Insect appendages are my most common study systems, where I use a combination of methods from functional genetics, morphometrics, endocrinology and genomics.
W. Cameron Jasper
PhD Candidate
Entomology and Nematology
UC Davis
Davis CA USA
wcjasper@ucdavis.edu
El Nino Bee Lab
My research focuses on the specialized "social" glands of the European honey bee (Apis mellifera) and how the regulation of gene expression within those glands underlies the bee's social organization.
Gaël Le Trionnaire
Research Scientist
Plant health and protection
INRA, France
Le Rheu Brittany France
gael.le-trionnaire@inra.fr
Ecology and Genetic of Insects
Functional Genomics in Aphids. We are particularly interested on how aphids can perceive changes in day length to switch from asexual to sexual reproduction. We thus develop integrative genomics (RNA-seq, FAIRE-seq and ChIP-seq) to understand large scale genome expression changes but are also currently setting up a step-by-step protocol of targeted mutagenesis with CRISPR-Cas9 system to precisely test for the real function of candidate genes in the photoperiodic response.
Chih-Chi Lee
Research assistant
CV
Biodiversity Research Center
Academia Sinica
Taipei Taiwan Taiwan
supervolans@gmail.com

My research is focus on the adaption of invasive insects, from genomic approach to decipher what gene(s) aided the fire ants adapt to introduced environments. My another research topic is to reveal the transposon interaction with the host genome in social insects by investigating include transposon phylogenetic relationship, expression level of transposon, and transposon insertion position.
Olawale Adeyinka
Molecular Biology, CEMB
University of Punjab, Pakistan
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
adeyinka.olawale@gmail.com
Seed Biotechnology
to develop a biotechnology technique that would be efficient to transform Africa indigenous crop against insect pest
Anthony Clarke
Professor
School of Earth, Environmental and Biological Sciences
Queensland University of Technology
Brisbane Queensland Australia
a.clarke@qut.edu.au

Tephritid fruit flies, especially the genera Bactrocera and Zeugodacus. The lab has interest in the systematics, taxonomy and diagnostics of these species, as well as a focus on their ecology and behaviour with a special interest in host utilisation patterns (e.g. generalism vesus specialsim) and mechanisms of host use. We use genetics and genomics equally with behaviour and ecology. We have also used genomic tools to better understand the response of male Bactrocera to plant derived secondary chemicals (= the so called fruit fly male lures).
Ramya Shanivarsanthe Leelesh
Dr Ramya S L
CV
Dpt of Molecular Biology
QTLOmics Technology Pvt Ltd
Bangalore Karnataka India
ramya.sl1989@gmail.com

RESEARCH INTEREST Plant-insect interaction, molecular biology, insect digestive physiology, insect detoxification and resistance mechanism, RNAi in pest management, endosymbionts, CRISPER/Cas, gene editing, NGS, genetic diversity, phylogenetic analysis, SSR, SNP, HRM analysis, barcoding, gene expression and insecticide degradation.
Mary Adewole
Miss
CV
Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology
University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo Nigeria
modupeadewole75@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
MY ACADEMIC RESEARCH FOCUS I am a young graduate female researcher with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture (Crop protection) from the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (2010). I have concluded a Master of Science Degree (2015) (Entomology) in the Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan with a Ph.D grade. Quest for more knowledge and desire to be an academia, a researcher and voice to reckon with in in the academic research world (Agriculture) have informed my stride to apply for further study to acquire Ph.D. I have been offered
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Mateus Berni
Institute of Biomedical Sciences
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
mateusberni@yahoo.com.br
Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento
Developmental Biology in Rhodnius prolixus
pradeep bhongale
AGROCHEMICALS AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY. KOLHAPUR
KOLHAPUR MAHARASTRA INDIA
pradeepbhongale1993@gmail.com

DNA BARCODING FOR PEST IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT
sanket deshmukh
AGROCHEMICAL AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY
nagpur maharstra india
sssanketdeshmukh@gmail.com

insilico study for pest managment
Janneke Bloem
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University The Netherlands
Wageningen x Netherlands
janneke.bloem@wur.nl

Entomology
Glady Samuel
Entomology
Texas A&M
College Station TX USA
hsamuel@tamu.edu

Vector Borne diseases, Vector Viral Interactions, Mosquito Antiviral pathways
Sonja Lindner
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
sonja.lindner@uni-goettingen.de

My aim is to study the RNAi process in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and to apply results to agricultural insect pests.
joe kramer
Instructor/director
pathology
rwjms
piscataway  nj usda
kramerjo@rwjms.rutgers.edu

Epitranscriptomics
Alison Gerken
Post Doctoral Researcher
Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
USDA ARS
Manhattan Kansas United States
alison.gerken@ars.usda.gov

My research focus is on functional genomics of sensory systems in stored grain insect pests. I'm interested in the applied aspects of understanding what attracts insects to stored grain and how we can intercept them. I'm interested in the genetic variation underlying behavioral components associated with attraction to stored grain.
Robert Reed
Associate Professor
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University
Ithaca New York United States
robertreed@cornell.edu
Reed Lab
Our lab studies the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns.
Jeff Demuth
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington Texas United States
jpdemuth@uta.edu
Demuth Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics. Speciation. Sex chromosome evolution. Gene family evolution. Sexual selection.
Ronny Rosner
Institute of Neuroscience
Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne England,  United Kingdom
ronny.rosner@ncl.ac.uk

I am neurophysiologist and am working on stereoscopic vision in the praying mantis.
Loic Revuelta
Senior Scientist (Insect Scientist)
Research & Development
Oxitec
Abingdon Oxfordshire United Kingdom
loicrl@gmail.com

I am interested in all areas of molecular entomology and insect biotechnology that could provide a basis for the research of novel insect control strategies. My current research focuses on the design and creation of transgenic Diptera for use in the field. My efforts encompass production, testing and support of all rearing aspects - including development of new rearing approaches - and also the molecular biology for the design of the genetic constructs for transformation.
Anja Pen
MSc.
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Aarhus University
Tjele Region Midt-Jylland Danmark
anja.pen@mbg.au.dk
Section for Molecular Genetics and Systems Biology
I am studying the effects of RNA on epigenetic marks in caste development of honey bees.
Judith Wexler
CV
Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
jrwexler@ucdavis.edu

I'm interested in the evolution of insect sexual differentiation pathways. Specifically, I'm researching how a system of sex determination via alternative splicing arose in holometabolous insects by studying sex differentiation in hemimetabolous insects.
Kevin Vogel
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Georgia
Athens GA United States
kjvogel@uga.edu
Strand Lab
My research focuses on mechanisms of mosquito development and reproduction. Specifically, I investigate mosquito reproductive endocrinology and mosquito-microbiome interactions.
Raquel Montanez-Gonzalez
Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Mishawaka IN USA
rmontane@nd.edu
Besansky Lab
Developing and validating a computational approach to identify chromosomal inversions in the Anopheles gambiae Ag1000G HapMap data, and to develop complementary molecular karyotyping approaches applicable without sequencing.
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
John Beckmann
Dr.
CV
Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Yale University
New Haven Connecticut USA
john.beckmann@yale.edu

I study the molecular mechanism of Wolbachia induced cytoplasmic incompatibility in insects. With respect to this I seek to develop transgenes that will be effective genetic units for induction of sterility and application of the sterile insect technique.
Jacob Stewart
Molecular Biology
University of Idaho
Moscow Id United States
jakestew@mail.com
Jake Stewart
Mating compatibility systems in Basidiomycetes, yeast genetics, plant transformation, gene drive systems, selfish elements/transposons, vector insect genetics and transformation.
Rafael Homem
Biological Chemistry and Crop Protection Department
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden England United Kingdom
rafael.homem@rothamsted.ac.uk

Insecticide resistance
Thais Rodrigues
PhD
CV
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
thaisbarros.bio@gmail.com

RNAi technology applied to pest management
Allison Hansen
Department of Entomology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois United States
akh@illinois.edu
Hansen Lab
The main focus of my research laboratory is to investigate host-symbiont interactions between sap-sucking insects (e.g., psyllids, whiteflies, scale insects) and their ancient obligate bacterial symbionts, because of their highly co-evolved and shared amino acid metabolisms. Due to genome-enabled sequencing technology, the regulation of this co-evolved amino-acid symbiosis is an emerging area of research in these unculturable microbe-insect systems.
Miranda Whitten
Dr
Institute of Life Science
Swansea University
Swansea County of Swansea UK
m.m.a.whitten@swansea.ac.uk
Applied Molecular Microbiology Group
Lecturer in infectious disease, parasitology and genetic analysis. Research interests in RNAi, symbiotic bacteria and symbiont-mediated RNAi, Galleria mellonella as a model organism, insect immunity, host-parasite interactions. I focus on insects that transmit disease (particularly neglected tropical diseases) and agricultural pests.
Linda Kothera
Microbiologist
Division of Vector-Borne Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Fort Collins CO US
lkothera@cdc.gov

Genetic changes associated with insecticide resistance in vector mosquitoes.
Tofazzal Hossain Howlader
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Bangladesh Agricultural University
Mymensingh Mymensingh Bangladesh
tofazzalh@gmail.com

Bacillus thuringiensis, Entomopathogenic fungi
Azza Elgendy
CV
Entomology Department
Faculty of Science, Cairo University
Giza Non-US/Non-Canadian Egypt
aelgendy@sci.cu.edu.eg

Medical entomology
Meredith Hawley
Research and Development Specialist
Pest Screening
Bayer NA - CropScience Division
Morrisville North Carolina United States of America
meredith.hawley@bayer.com
Research and Development Specialist
Investigating potential traits providing pest resistance in agricultural crops of interest
Kirsten Pelz-Stelinski
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Lake Alfred FL US
pelzstelinski@ufl.edu

Disruption of bacterial plant pathogen transmission, symbiosis, insect immunity
Michelle Anderson
Lab Manager
CV
Fralin Life Science Institute and Department of Entomology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg VA USA
manderson@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in our laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Kolja Neil Eckermann
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
keckerm1@uni-goettingen.de

Development of new environmental friendly methods and techniques to improve pest and disease vector control.
Marco Salvemini
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Naples Federico II
Naples ITALY Europe
marco.salvemini@unina.it
WEBSITE
My research activity is focused on the study of genes involed in sex determination and reproductive biology in insects of economical and medical importance. In particular I'm studying sex determination genes and sex-biased gene expression in the sand fly Phlebotomus perniciosus and in the mosquito Aedes albopictus. The approach utilized in my research is both classical, by molecular genetics and reverse genetics techniques (in vivo RNAi in embryos, larvae and adults) and computational, through the production and the analysis of sex-specific transcriptomics data by NGS. In particular, I’m developing new graphical interfaces and on-line databases for comparative genomic analyses and
Daniel Pers
PhD Student
Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago IL USA
dpers88@gmail.com

Gene Regulatory Networks of Embryo Patterning
Konner Winkley
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kmwinkley@gmail.com
Michel Lab
I explore the functions of signaling pathways on fungal and bacterial infections in mosquitoes.
Ulrich Beckers
Dr.
Department of biology and Department of chemistry
Bielefeld University
Gütersloh NRW F. R. Germany
ulrich.beckers@web.de

I am an neuroscientist interested in coding and signal transmission. I work on cellualar level mostly using electrophysiological methods. I want to evaluate genetic methods for my research projects. Primarily I want to learn more about CRIPR/CAS9. I may also look for potential collaborations (am planning to apply for a grant).
Girish Neelakanta
Assistant Professor (tenure-track)
Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk VA USA
gneelaka@odu.edu
Neelakanta Lab
My laboratory studies host-microbe interactions at the molecular level. Current focus is to understand interactions of vector-borne pathogens with their arthropod vectors (both hard and soft ticks) and their mammalian hosts. In addition, we study several aspects of vector biology in terms of understanding arthropod feeding, behavior to environment stimuli and symbiosis with microbes. We use combination of genetics, molecular biology, genomics, immunology, cell biology and microbiology approaches to decipher important aspects of these interactions.
Patricia Pietrantonio
Professor and AgriLife Research Fellow
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station  TX USA
p-pietrantonio@tamu.edu
Insect Toxicology and Physiology
Insect and tick endocrinology with emphasis in G protein-coupled receptors
Keith Hopper
Dr.
CV
Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Newark DE USA
khopper@udel.edu
USDA-ARS-Beneficial Insect Introductions Research Unit
The central theme of my research is to determine the mechanisms affecting host specificity of parasitic and herbivorous insects. My lab is testing alternative hypotheses about the genetic architecture of specificity: many genes interacting epistatically versus few genes interacting additively. Evolutionary shifts are much less likely under the first hypothesis than under the second. We are studing the genomics and transcriptomics of differences in host specificity among insect species.
Wendy Moore
Assistant Professor, Insect Systematics and Curator
Department of Entomology
University of Arizona
Tucson Arizona United States
wmoore@email.arizona.edu

Dr. Wendy Moore and her lab members investigate the evolution and ecology of terrestrial arthropods. Specific projects focus on arthropod systematics. We use molecular genetic techniques and morphological methods to infer robust phylogenetic frameworks to identify and describe natural groups of terrestrial arthropods, to study their diversification and patterns of distribution, and to elucidate their ecological roles and to assess the impact of key innovations on their evolutionary histories.
Murat Güler
P.hD. Student
Biology/Zoology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Campus Türkiye
muratgmbg@gmail.com
Cumsag
I earned my BSc degree from Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics (MBG) at the Cumhuriyet University. My research interests were shaped during this time. The MBG program have provided me with general theory and practice in the area of molecular biology. But my interest specially is focused on bioinformatics and evolutionary biology. At the same time I have started to work with Dr. Hasan H. BAŞIBÜYÜK, who is the head of the Molecular Systematic Research Group of Cumhuriyet University (for more info. cumsag.com). The research group works mainly on taxonomy, phylogeny, population genetics and mitogenome of sawflies (Symphyta: Hymenoptera).
Conor McMeniman
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins Malaria Research Institute, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
cmcmeni1@jhu.edu

My group studies the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving mosquito attraction to humans, and the impact of pathogen infection on mosquito olfactory perception and behavior.
Katrina Klett
Agronomy
Vietnam National University of Agriculture
Hanoi  Hanoi Vietnam
katrina.klett@gmail.com
Tropical Bee and Beekeeping Research Institute
I am interested in honey bee breeding as a means of selecting for genetic resistance to pathogens and producing robust and healthy bees.
Anne-Christine Auge
Junior Technician
Cellular and Molecular Medicine (CMM)
University of Ottawa
Ottawa Ontario Canada
aauge@uottawa.ca

I work in a new Drosophila melanogaster lab, studying the neurological and genetic bases of social and sexual behaviour in fruit flies.
Lien Thi Phuong Nguyen
Ph.D
CV
Insect Ecology Department
Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources
Hanoi Hanoi Vietnam
phuonglientit@gmail.com

My work is focusing on the inventory of hymenopterans and their ecology and behavior, especially wasps of the family Vespidae, bees of the family Apidae and ants of the family Formicidae, concentrating on the conservation of various areas within Vietnam such as limestone forest and mangrove forest.
Duverney Chaverra Rodriguez
PhD Candidate
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
State College Pennsylvania United States
ddc172@psu.edu
Jason Rasgon Lab
My research focuses in exploring and optimizing strategies to produce transgenic insects via maternal injection.
Kim Ferguson
PhD Candidate
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
kim.ferguson@wur.nl

I am an Early Stage Researcher (ESR) in the BINGO ITN, Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network (www.bingo-itn.eu for more info). Right now I'm in the first stage of my PhD so I'm trying to discover as much as possible and learn techniques to help me in my project. I will work with a few different species, but the goal is to use NGS technology to explore the genetic variation in wild-caught and commercially reared populations of select biocontrol species. I will work with Trichogramma brassicae, Nesidiocoris tenuis, and Amblyseious swirskii (aka Typhlodromips swirskii). They
Joshua Fisher
Invasive Species Biologist
Ecological Services
US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior
Honolulu Hawaii US
joshua_fisher@fws.gov

Vector Control, Avian Malaria
Luciano Cosme
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
luciano.cosme@yale.edu
Powell's Lab
Mosquito evolutionary genetics. Gene and miR expression.
Kathleen Cuijvers
Biological Sciences
The University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA Australia
kathleen.cuijvers@student.adelaide.edu.au

Alzheimer's research using zebrafish in vivo system.
Val Saffer
Administrative Assistant
Dr. David O'Brochta Lab
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
Rockville MD USA
safferv@ibbr.umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
None.
Lorna Cohen
PhD Candidate
Biological Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
cohen36@uic.edu
Lynch Lab
I am currently researching the genetic basis of head development in the parasitiod wasp, Nasonia. We aim to elucidate how specific morphologies are encoded in the genome, and the molecular mechanisms that regulate size and shape.
Joaquin de Navascues
Research Fellow
European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute
Cardiff University
Cardiff Cardiff United Kingdom
denavascuesj@cardiff.ac.uk

I am interested in how cells take decisions based on inter cellular signalling, in particular about differentiation. I study this in the context of the adult intestinal stem cells of the fruit fly.
Rick DeRose
External Collaborations and Technology Acquistion
Syngenta
RTP NC USA
rick.derose@syngenta.com

Mechanisms and methods for controlling insects.
Anna Gilles
Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon
Lyon Rhône-Alpes France
anna.f.gilles@gmail.com

I am working on posterior development in the insect model Tribolium castaneum. In contrast to Drosophila, the abdominal segments of Tribolium develop from a posterior growth zone during embryogenesis in a process similar to vertebrate somitogenesis. My project aims to understand the cellular basis of this by characterizing cell behavior both by in vivo imaging experiments and by clonal analysis. While the posterior growth zone of short germ insects has been described as a proliferative tissue in the classical literature, recent studies and my own data point to cell rearrangement as the main cause of posterior elongation. I am currently
Yizhou Chen
Senior Research Scientist
NSW Department of Primary Industries
Elizabeth Macarthur Agricultural Institute
Menangle NSW Australia
yizhou.chen@dpi.nsw.gov.au

genetics of insecticide resistance
Clement Kent
Senior Scientist
Janelia Research Campus
Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Ashburn VA USA
clementfkent@gmail.com
Heberlein Lab
Insect behavior genetics, genomics, and population genomics. Research foci in Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera.
Sandra Rehan
Assistant Professor of Genome Enabled Biology
Biological Sciences
University of New Hampshire
Durham New Hampshire USA
sandra.rehan@unh.edu
UNH Bee Lab
My research focus is social evolution and genetics. I have a special interest in the origin and evolution of social behavior in bees. The lab has three main foci: molecular phylogeny, behavioral ecology and comparative genomics. We employ these three levels of biological integration to study social complexity at multiple evolutionary scales.
Richard Meisel
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Biochemistry
University of Houston
Houston TX United States
rpmeisel@uh.edu

Evolutionary genomics of sex chromosomes, sex determination, and sexual dimorphism in flies.
Rolando Rivera-Pomar
Professor and Investigator
Centro de Bioinvestigaciones
Universidad Nacional del Noroeste de Buenos Aires / National Science and Technology Research Council (CONICET)
Centro Regional de Estudios Genómicos
Pergamino Buenos Aires Argentina
rrivera@unnoba.edu.ar
Genetics and functional genomics
Our laboratory is interested in comparative genomics of insects. We study early developmental genes and their regulation with a focus on the segmentation process, insecticide resistance-related genes, and small peptides and neuropeptides in different insect species, some of them of medical and agricultural interest.
Marko Petek
PhD
Department of Biotechnology and Systems Biology
National Institute of Biology
Ljubljana Osrednjeslovenska Slovenia
marko.petek@nib.si

insect RNAi, plant-insect interactions, insect digestive enzymes
Jennifer Baltzegar
NSF IGERT Fellow in Genetic Engineering and Society
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
jen_baltzegar@ncsu.edu
Gould Lab
I am broadly interested in studying the differences between populations and species via mechanisms of evolution and impacts of population change. I am particularly interested in studying the impacts genetic engineering technologies have on natural populations.
Anna Katrina Briley
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence/ University of Florida
Jacksonville Florida US
annakatrinabriley@gmail.com

Testing and Evaluation of novel pesticide products and equipment for military use.
Bart Pannebakker
Assistant Professor
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
bart.pannebakker@wur.nl

I am interested in the evolution and genomics of life-history traits and reproductive strategies in insects. My research focuses on the genetic and physiological mechanisms that underlie these traits in parasitoid wasps (insects that lay their eggs on other insects), and in honeybees. I am also Coordinator of BINGO-ITN: Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl. BINGO is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network that develops innovative research training to improve the production and performance of natural enemies in biological control by the use of genetic variation for rearing, monitoring and performance.
Heather Hines
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology, Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
hmh19@psu.edu
Hines Lab
My lab examines the evolution of adaptive trait variation, focusing heavily on the evolution of mimetic patterning. We are pushing a new system for evolutionary genetics and evo-devo in discovery of the genes that are driving the radiation in coloration, largely as a result of mimicry, in the bumble bees. We utilize more descriptive analytical chemsitry, developmental and systematic approaches, and combine these with genomic and transcriptomic approaches to target candidate genes for mimicry and better understand the evolution of this adaptive diversification. Once these genes are targeted we can gain a better understanding of how these novel phenotypes evolved,
Alexandros Belavilas-Trovas
Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
alexbelavilas@hotmail.com
Molecular biology & genomics-Mathiopoulos lab
The analysis of genes involved in the sexual behaviour of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. Our purpose is the use of these data for the improvement of the SIT approaches or other innovative pest control strategies
Ewan CAMPBELL
Dr
School of Biological Sciences
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen Aberdeen City United Kingdom
e.m.campbell@abdn.ac.uk
Bowman Lab
I am interested in applying RNAi and gene silencing techniques to the field of agricultural and livestock pests with a focus on the major parasite of Honey bees, the Varroa mite. I have developed RNAi targets and delivery mechanisms in a range of species including Sea Lice, Ticks and mites. I am also interested in utilising RNAi and gene manipulation for the study of physiological pathways in ectoparasites, such as in host sensing, reproductive cues and blood feeding.
T.G. Emyr Davies
Dr
Biological Chemistry & Crop Protection
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire UK
emyr.davies@rothamsted.ac.uk
Senior Research Scientist
Recent research has been focused on understanding the molecular basis of target site (voltage-gated sodium channel, ryanodine receptor) resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, DDT and diamide insecticides in agricultural pests and vectors of human disease. Currently working towards establishing a transformation platform at Rothamsted using CRISPRs/TALENs and transgenic D. melanogaster to study metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms.
Ann Tate
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TENNESSEE United States
annthomastate@gmail.com

We study the evolutionary ecology of infection and immunity in laboratory and wild insect populations. Our primary model host is Tribolium castaneum, and we combine experiments and theory to understand the effect of host-microbe interactions across biological levels of organization.
Waring Trible
Genetics
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
wtrible@rockefeller.edu
Kronauer Laboratory
Ant genetics. I am currently working on developing a CRISPR protocol in the ant Cerapachys biroi, which I will use to study genes relevant to caste differentiation and chemical communication. Past projects include population genetics of fire ants and army ants, fire ant phermone analysis, and phylogenetics of ant evolution.
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Neetha Nanoth Vellichirammal
Postdoctoral Research Associate
Department of Entomology
University of Nebraska-Lincoln
Lincoln NE USA
neethav@gmail.com

I am a Postdoctoral researcher at the Department of Entomology, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, working with non-model insects. I am broadly interested in understanding the genetics of complex phenotypes. I work with pea aphids that are excellent laboratory models to investigate environmental control of developmental plasticity. I also work with economically important pests of corn including European corn borer and Western corn rootworm. My research revolves around understanding complex biological processes for example, maternal signals contributing to developmental plasticity in pea aphids, understanding mechanisms of insect resistance to transgenic plants and developing novel pest control mechanisms using genome editing.
Paula Irles
Assistant Professor
Institute of Agronomic Science
Universidad de O'Higgins
Rancagua Libertador Bernardo O'Higgins Chile
pirles@uc.cl

My research focused on the molecular mechanisms under insect oogenesis, specifically which and how signaling pathways are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and cell death during ovary maturation. I am currently work on the role of Hippo signaling pathway during ovarian and embryo development in earwigs.
Sara Mitchell
Dr
Debug
Verily Life Sciences
South San Francisco CA United States
moominsara@gmail.com
Debug Project
After completing a PhD at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine focusing on the molecular determinants of insecticide resistance in An. gambiae I joined the lab of Flaminia Catteruccia at Imperial College London in 2011. The Catteruccia lab (now at Harvard School of Public Health) studies the molecular basis of mating and reproduction in both the female and male Anopheles gambiae mosquitos. My projects within the lab focused on the female post-mating response, which we investigated through transcriptional analysis and functional RNAi approaches. I was also part of a global genomics project studying 16 different Anopheline species, determining
Jacob Riveron
Postdoctoral Research Assistant
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
jacob.riveron@lstmed.ac.uk
Vector Biology -LSTM
My current research focus is on understanding the molecular basis underlying the insecticide resistance in the African malaria-mosquito, Anopheles funestus, using functional analyses. I also have interest in the functional characterization of genes involved in insecticide resistance in agricultural pests, in insect behavior, and in the elucidation of the molecular basis of the olfaction in Drosophila melanogaster and in malaria and dengue vectors.
Ferdinand NANFACK MINKEU
Mr
Parasitology and Mycology
Pasteur
Paris Paris 15 France
nanleplot@yahoo.fr

My researches are focused on host-pathogen interactions in African malaria mosquito. Transgenic tools to fight malaria Modification of Tribolium castaneum and Sitophilus oryzae for SIT control
Hector Quemada
Director, Biosafety Resource Network
Institute for International Crop Improvement
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
St. Louis MO USA
hquemada@danforthcenter.org

My area of work is the regulation of genetically engineered organisms, including transgenic insects and transgenic crops.
Alys Jarvela
Postdoctoral Researcher
CV
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
veniecealys@gmail.com
Pick Lab
Building and comparing developmental gene regulatory networks among insects
Angela Meccariello
Ph.D. student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Naples 'Federico II'
Naples Italy Italy
angela.meccariello@unina.it
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
Genetics and transcriptomics of sex determination in pest insects: Aedes albopictus Ceratitis capitata Phlebotomus perniciosus
Zhenqing Chen
Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Urbana Illinois USA
zqchen@illinois.edu

The social behavior of Honeybee
Honglin Feng
Graduate Student
CV
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables FL USA
honglin@bio.miami.edu
The Wilson Lab
Insect/Bacteria symbiosis
RANIA ABD EL-WAHAB
Assistant Professor
CV
Mites of Cotton and Field Crops
PLANT PROTECTION RESEARCH INSTITUTE
MANSOURA MANSOURA EGYPT
rania-proline@hotmail.com

NANOTECHNOLOGY,LIGHT EMITTING DIODES EFFECTS,PREDATION ON MITES
Peter Piermarini
Assistant Professor
Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
piermarini.1@osu.edu

My lab investigates the molecular physiology of mosquito vectors with a focus on the excretory system.
kailash lipne
Research and development
Mahyco Research centre, Jalna
Jalna Maharashtra INDIA
kailash.lipne@gmail.com
Research associate
RNAi technology, Insecticidal gene discovery.
Atef Sayed
CV
Biological control
Plant Protection Research
Ismailia Ismailia Egypt
atef.mahmoud1@gmail.com

Willing to collaborate on : - Genetic and molecular researches and biotechnological and nanotechnology approaches for the management of insect pests. - Improve pest control strategies and programs for major economic pests and crops through new applied research results. - Maximization of biological control and other relevant substitutes within the framework of IPM and environmentally safe methods.
Dina Fonseca
Professor
Entomology; Ecology&Evolution, Public Health
Rutgers University
Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics, Smithsonian
New Brunswick NJ USA
dinafons@rci.rutgers.edu
Fonseca
My primary research interests are the evolution, prevention, and control of invasive mosquitoes, the principal vectors of significant disease epizootics and epidemics. Our results indicate that populations differ in vectorial capacity over space and time, profoundly affecting epidemiological landscapes and risk estimates. Rapid evolution in invasive mosquito vectors is a good model for the effects of Global Climate Change on disease epidemiology.
Justin Overcash
Graduate Research Assistant
Genetics
Texas A&M
College Station Texas USA
justmo1@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
DNA double stranded break repair, manipulation of the classical non-homologous end joining pathway to achieved desired gene editing, gene drive mechanisms in Aedes aegypti & CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing techniques
Sarah Merkling
Departement of Medical Microbiology
Radboud University Medical Center Nijmegen
Njmegen Gelderland The Netherlands
sarah.merkling@gmail.com
Ronald van Rij's lab
Insect antiviral immunity
Michalis Averof
IGFL
CNRS
Lyon Rhone France
michalis.averof@ens-lyon.fr

Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Mary Chaffee
Graduate Student
CV
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY USA
mary.chaffee@rochester.edu

My research is focused on studying the molecular basis of the wing polyphenism is pea aphids.
Kimberly Stephens
Entomology
University of California - Riverside
Riverside California United States
kstep002@ucr.edu

Sperm motility and sperm-egg interactions
Ethan Degner
Student
Entomology Department
Cornell University
Ithaca NY United States
ecd77@cornell.edu
Harrington Lab
I am broadly interested in the ecology of insect vectors of human disease. Specfically, I am interested in the reproductive biology of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.
Sarah Maguire
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Belle Mead NJ United States
smaguire@Princeton.edu

I am broadly interested in the biological basis of behavior – especially through neurogenetic and evolutionary perspectives. The mosquito, Aedes aegypti, is an ideal model system to study the biological basis of behavior because its attraction to human hosts makes it the number one vector of yellow and Dengue fever, the latter of which affects an estimated 50 million people per year! The goal of my research is to 1) determine the molecular basis of Aedes’s attraction to humans as well as 2) map the neural circuitry underlying Aedes’s attraction and repulsion behavior.
Margaret Allen
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Pests Research Unit
US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service
Stoneville MS USA
megallenathome@gmail.com
Functional Genetics
Functional genetics of a variety of insects that are non-model organisms.
Zengchun Ye
Department of Internal Medicine
MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston TEXAS United States
yzchun9@gmail.com

nephrology
Scott Geib
Research Entomologist
DKI-PBARC
USDA-ARS
Hilo Hawaii United States
scott.geib@ars.usda.gov

Genomics of Tephritid fruit flies. Whole genome sequencing, trait association, QTL, Linkage mapping, Functional Genomics, RNAi, CRISPR/CAS
Gary Puterka
Research scientist
Wheat, Peanut, other crops research unit, USDA-ARS
USDA-ARS
Stillwater OK USA
gary.puterka@ars.usda.gov
USDA-ARS, Wheat, peanuts, and other crops research unit
Aphid Pest Management/genetics; Wheat, Barley, and Sorghum aphid resistant germplasm development
Jacob Wenger
Ohio State Presidential Fellow
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Wooster OH USA
wenger.93@osu.edu

I am interested in the evolutionary and ecological mechanisms governing adaptation in pest insect populations, and how these mechanisms can be used to develop insect resistance management plans. My current work utilizes genomic analyses to clarify the inheritance and population dynamics of virulence to plant resistance in the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines). I am also interested in the role of plasticity and endosymbionts in insect adaptation.
Flor Acevedo
Graduate student
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA United States
floredith.acevedo@gmail.com

Functional genomics, insect transformation, plant defense response to biotic stresses, chemical ecology,
Dave Denlinger
CV
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
david.denlinger@aggiemail.usu.edu
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Isabelle Vea
Postdoctoral Fellow
Graduate School of Bio-Agricultural Sciences
Nagoya University
Nagoya Aichi Japan
isabelle.vea@gmail.com

Elucidating extreme sexual dimorphism in scale insects through Juvenile Hormone regulation, using the Japanese mealybug as a study model.
Wei Peng
Huazhong Agricultural University
College of Plant Science and Technology
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Insect Resource Application and Sustainable Pest Control and Institute of Urban and Horticultural Pests
Wuhan Hubei China
pengweijack@163.com
State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Hubei Key Laboratory of Insect Resource Application and Sustainable Pest Control and Institute of Urban and Horticultural Pests
The molecular regulation of sex determination and female-specific lethality or embryonic conditional lethality in Bactrocera species 
Raman Chandrasekar
Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
manhattan Kansas United States
biochandrus@yahoo.com
Research Associate
1. RNA Sequence analysis, Genomic and Proteomics appraoches 2. Study of insect proteins and enzymes will not only give valuable information on their unique biochemistry and physiology but will also identify novel tools for the development of new technologies and new ways to produce novel insect control measures. My main focus is will address the physiological and biochemical functions of proteins and enzymes in the insects’ life processes by using proteomics tools (i.e 2D PAGE, MS, MALDI-TOF, PMF), characterization of novel enzymes, qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their interactions on a genome scale,
Adenike Adeyemo
Dr Mrs
Department of Biology, School of Sciences
Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
Akure,  Ondo State Nigeria
yemonike@yahoo.com
Food Storage Laboratory, Department of Biology
Stored products Entomology, Insect biochemistry with emphasis on mode of action of bio -pesticides in insects
Claudio Ramirez
Associate Professor
Instituto de Ciencias Biológicas
Universidad de Talca
Talca Talca Chile
clramirez@utalca.cl
Laboratorio de Interacciones Insecto-Planta
I am interested on insect-plant interactions emphasizing proximal (ecological) and distal (evolutionary) causes. This approach is intended to elucidate insect herbivory patterns in native and productive systems. From the proximal point of view, I have been studying behavioural and morphological mechanisms underlying insect-feeding patterns, as well as plant responses to insect herbivory. Concerning distal causes, I am looking for experimental or co-relational association between proximal causes and reproductive output, as well as their phylogenetic associations.
Keshava Mysore
PhD
CV
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine - University of Notre Dame
South Bend Indiana USA
kmysore@iu.edu
Duman-Scheel Lab
I am currently studying functional and developmental neurogenetics of the dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti.
Muhammad Tayyib Naseem
CV
Agriculture Biotechnology Division
National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
tayyibnaseem@hotmail.com
Muhammad Naseem
DNA based identification of aphid species and vector-virus association analysis of aphid borne luteovirus
Robert Waterhouse
Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellow
Department of Genetic Medicine and Development
University of Geneva Medical School
Geneva Geneva Switzerland
robert.waterhouse@unige.ch
Computational Evolutionary Genomics Group
Evolutionary genomics of mosquitoes and other insects.
Jianwu Chen
Dr
Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA United States
jwchen97@yahoo.com

Mechanism of action of Bt toxins
Mubarak Hussain Syed
Dr
University of Oregon
HHMI/Institute for neurobiology
Eugene Oregon United States
mosvey@gmail.com
Doe lab
Drosophila neural Stem cell temporal identity
David Majerowicz
Msc., PhD.
Faculdade de Farmacia
Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro Rio de Janeiro Brazil
majerowicz@pharma.ufrj.br

Use of insect as models for lipid metabolsim and obesity; Role of nuclear receptors and hormones in the control of lipid metabolism; Role of nuclear receptors in the Rhodnius prolixus - Trypanossoma cruzi interaction.
Robert Brucker
Rowland Junior Fellow
FAS - Rowland Institute
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
bruckerlab@gmail.com
Brucker lab
Microbe-host-envoronment interactions and evolution.
Samuel Helrich
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
samuel.helrich@tufts.edu

Bioactuation
Ashley Peery
Entomology
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg VA United States
peerya2@vt.edu

As I pursue my PhD I am using comparative genomics to investigate evolutionary changes between species of Anopheles mosquitoes. I have created a chromosome based genome assembly for Anopheles stephensi which has allowed characterization of molecular features including genes, transposable elements, simple repeats and scaffold or matrix associated regions within the genome. I am interested in how molecular features within the genome impact the propensity for the genome to change via chromosomal inversions. The 16 genomes project has also allowed me to characterize the molecular features within the mapped genomes of mosquitoes representing ~100 MY of Anopheles evolution. This
Maaria Kankare
Academy Fellow
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyvaskyla
Jyvaskyla Keski-Suomi Finland
maaria.kankare@jyu.fi
Evolutionary Genetics
My research interests are focused on the adaptation to northern conditions at the genetic and genomic levels. Current work is directed to the role of alternative splicing in candidate genes in life-history traits involved in adaptation to seasonally varying environment.
Eveline Verhulst
PhD
CV
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Wageningen The Netherlands
e.c.verhulst@gmail.com

My main research focuses on the evolution of sex determining mechanisms in insects. From 2014 onwards, I am funded by a NWO Veni grant to determine how this one conserved gene, called doublesex, can regulate the diverse sexual morphologies found in insects. This research is hosted at the Wageningen University (WUR) in the Laboratory of Genetics group. The main ambition of my research is to compare the sex determining pathways of three parasitic wasp species: Nasonia vitripennis, Muscidifurax raptorellus and M. uniraptor.
Arnubio Valencia
Plant Sciences
Universidad de Caldas
Manizales Caldas Colombia
arnubio.valencia@ucaldas.edu.co

Research activities are focused on the study of transcripts (RNAm) from the intestinal tract of insect pests, in order to find some target insect genes that could be silenced using RNAi technology. In addition, I am also interested in cloning and expression of insect genes involved with the digestion of cellulose with potential to be used in future programs related with bioenergy production and Insect transcriptome analysis.
Valeria Petrella
PhD
CV
biology
University of Naples "Federico II"
Napoli Italy Italy
valeria.petrella@unina.it
Insects Molecular Genetics
I'm a postdoctoral researcher with a broad interest in Molecular Genetics. My main research focuses on the study of sex determining mechanisms in insects and biotech approaches to control pest insects, with particular interest on diptera (Ceratitis capitata, aedes aegypti, aedes albopictus, phlebotomus perniciosus). In 2014 I've joined the Giuseppe Saccone and Marco Salvemini group as a Post. Doc with a one-year fellowship entitled "Comparative Population Transcriptomics To Uncover Sex Determination of Aedes albopictus and Phlebotomus perniciosus, Two Emerging Haematophagous Insect Species". Then main goal of my project is the molecular charachterization and functional analysis of genes
Zhao Chunyue
School of Life Sciences
Peking University
Bejing Beijing China
chunyuezhaopku@163.com

I use fly,cell culture and animal model systems to study cell death mechanisms and related drugs that can rescue or enhance cell death.
David Meekins
Post-Doc
CV
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
dmeekins@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel lab
My current research concerns the role of serpins in the immune response of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. The immune system of mosquitoes is regulated by serine protease cascades that culminate in a molecular response to invading pathogens. Serpins are irreversible inhibitors of serine proteases and have been found to negatively regulate these pathways. We are currently investigating the structure/function relationship of mosquito serpins and their target proteases with the purpose of developing both late life acting insecticides and methods to limit the transmission of parasites through the mosquito vector.
Kajan Muneeswaran
Ph.D. Student
CV
Department of Chemistry
University of Colombo
Colombo Western province Sri Lanka
kajan.muneeswaran@gmail.com
Biotechnology Laboratory
Developing transgenic mosquitoes resistant to all four dengue viral serotypes in Sri Lanka by RNA interference pathway which can be activated by the blood-meal in female mosquitoes to combat against the #1 killer dengue disease which kills more than 200 annually.
Josefa Steinhauer
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Yeshiva University
New York NY United States
jsteinha@yu.edu
Steinhauer Lab
Potent lipid signaling molecules such as fatty acids and lysophospholipids are stored in an inert state as membrane phospholipids. When cells need them, they are released from phospholipids by Phospholipase A2 enzymes. Acyltransferases reverse this reaction, and together the PLA2s and acyltransferases control the concentration of signaling lipids that are available. These enzymes are conserved from humans to Drosophila, but their functions are not well elucidated, especially in invertebrates. My lab is investigating this pathway in order to understand how lipid signals are generated and perceived by cells, how they change cell behaviors, and how they affect fertility.
Scott Emrich
Computer Science and Engineering
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
semrich@nd.edu

Arthropod bioinformatics with a focus on vectors and ecologically important genome improvement/analysis
Komal kumar Bollepogu Raja
student
Biochemistry and Molecular biology
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
kbollepo@mtu.edu

Studying complex color patterns in new model organisms
Valentina Resnik
Intitut für Bienenkunde, Oberursel
Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main
Oberusel Hessen Germany
valentinaresnik@gmx.de

Comparative analysis of metabotropic transmitter receptors in the honeybee and its external parasitic mite Varroa destructor
Peter Cherbas
Professor emeritus
Biology
Indiana University
Bloomington IN USA
cherbas@indiana.edu

Drosophila development. Ecdysone. Cell lines.
Jonathan Bobek
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe Arizona United States
jonathan.bobek@asu.edu
Gro Amdam Lab
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of behavior and physiology in the honeybee, Apis Mellifera. Previously I have studied artificial flower color choice of free-flying honeybee foragers, examining relative expression through microarray. I am currently examining gene candidates which may be involved in the transition from nurse to forager roles.
Simon Collier
PhD
Department of Genetics
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
psc38@cam.ac.uk
Fly Facility
Drosophila genome modification Planar Cell Polarity
Simon Groen
PhD
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Arizona
Tucson Arizona United States of America
scgroen@email.arizona.edu
Whiteman Lab
Plant-insect interactions
Brian Counterman
Biological Sciences
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS USA
bcounterman@biology.msstate.edu

Evolution, Population Genomics, Speciation
Hideki Sezutsu
Head
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
hsezutsu@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research lab
We are developing transgenic silkworms for fundamental research and applications. Our aims are to understand insect functions and evolution, in addition to design the insects for the creation of new insect-industries.
Hassan M. Ahmed
Developmental Biology
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
hmutasi@biologie.uni-goettingen.de
Wimmer Lab
My research focus in the use of developmental and molecular biology techniques to develop eco-friendly transgenic insect control strategies that can be used to fight insect of economical and public health importance (agricultural pest, diseases vectors).
Tamsin Jones
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
tjones01@fas.harvard.edu
Extavour Lab
I am interested in the evolution of germ line genes and their function. My current project examines the evolution of the oskar gene in insects. In flies, oskar is essential for germ line development, but in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, oskar functions in neural development. I am studying the molecular function of oskar in the cricket early nervous system.
Antonio Celestino Montes
PhD Student
Molecular Pathogenesis
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico City D.F. México
clonfago_t4@hotmail.com
Molecular Entomology
We are interested in knowing the process of developing the mosquito Aedes aegypti vector of dengue virus and the participation of the immune system in host pathogen interaction
Fidel de la Cruz Hernandez-Hernandez
PhD
Infectomica y Patogenesis Molecular
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico DF Mexico
cruzcruz@cinvestav.mx
Molecular Entomology
Physiology of midgut, fat body and salivary glans during feeding.
Diana Cox-Foster
Professor
Entomology
Penn State
Univ. Park PA USA
dxc12@psu.edu
Cox-Foster Lab
My Lab is interested in host/pathogen interactions. We are interested in genes associated with the immune system and cuticular exoskeleton (biosynthesis and molting). We are interested in immune responses to viruses, and responses to parasites such as nematodes and varroa mites. In particular, the anti-viral immune responses are of interest, going from point of infection to death of the insect host.
Ifeoma Ezugbo-Nwobi
Parasitology and Entomology
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka Anambra Nigeria
ifeomaezugbonwobi@yahoo.com
Parasitology and Entomology Research Lab
Focused on understanding vector-borne diseases like Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Dengue, Yellow fever, etc, so that better control measures can be developed. I seek to integrate traditional parasitological and entomological procedures with molecular genetics and bioinformatics-based technologies to deliver new insights into vector biology and ecology.
Eran Tauber
Dr
Genetics
University of Leicester
Leicester Leicestershire United Kingdom
eran.tauber@gmail.com

proximate and ultimate (evolutionary) mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms and seasonal timing.
Isidoro Feliciello
Dr.
Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery
University of Naples Federico II
Napoli NA Italy
ifelicie@unina.it
Laboratory of Experimental Biology
Satellite DNAs of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum: roles in genome dynamic and gene expression.
Jozef Vanden Broeck
Prof. Dr.
Animal Physiology and Neurobiology (Dept. of Biology)
University of Leuven
Leuven Flanders Belgium
Jozef.VandenBroeck@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
This research group is investigating the physiological role and mode of action of neural and endocrine messenger molecules in postembryonic developmental processes. These processes are studied in an evolutionary context by comparative approaches. In particular, we are studying receptors and their signal transduction pathways in insect cells. Our aim is to unravel the cellular and organismal physiological mechanisms that regulate important post-embryonic developmental processes, such as growth and reproduction. The group is also interested in the influence of environmental factors that can lead to the extreme phenotypic plasticity of locust species. In addition, application-oriented research is carried out to explore novel
Omaththage Perera
Research Entomologist
Southern Insect Management Research Unit
USDA-ARS
USDA Agricultural Research Service
Stoneville MS USA
op.perera@ars.usda.gov

Genetics, population genetics, and molecular biology of crop pests
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
Mark Blaxter
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Scotland UK
mark.blaxter@ed.ac.uk
Nematode and neglected genomics
The Blaxter nematode and neglected genomics lab uses genomics approaches, based on next-gen sequencing, to assemble, annotate and interpret the genomes of target species. While our main focus is on parasitic members of the Nematoda (we are involved in projects to understand the evolutionary genomic origins of parasitism, and collaborate with a wide range of biologists developing new drugs and vaccines for human and animal diseases), we also study free-living nematodes, nematomorphs, tardigrades, onychophorans, obscure and not so obscure arthropods... and some token lophotrochozoans, such as snails and earthworms. A second research focus in on bacterial symbionts of animals, particularly
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
Philip Batterham
Professor
Genetics Dept/Bio21 Institute
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
p.batterham@unimelb.edu.au
Systems biology of the insect:insecticide interface
There are three areas of research in my lab:- 1. The biology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are targeted by insecticides including neonicotinoids and spinosyns. 2. The systems biology of neonicotinoid metabolism and transport combining genetic and metabolomic approaches. 3. Pest insect genomics. Specifically we work on the flesh fly, Lucilia cuprina, and the moth, Helicoverpa armigera. Much of our research is conducted in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster, however we do bioassay the function of pest genes expressed in this species.
chao he
acedemic of plant protection
hunan agricultural university
changsha hunan China
837957358@qq.com

insectiside resistant
Adriana Costero-Saint Denis
Vector Biology Program Officer
Div. of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Rockville Maryland USA
acostero@niaid.nih.gov

Vector biology
Martin Beye
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary Genetics
Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
martin.beye@hhu.de
Honeybee genetics, evolutionary genetics
We would like to understand the genetic basis of sex determination and social behaviors in honeybees. We have developed a method to generate high frequency integrations of the piggyBac Transposon in the honeybee
Marcos Pereira
Full Professor
Department of Parasitology
Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG)
Belo Horizonte Minas Gerais Brazil
marcoshp@icb.ufmg.br
Laboratory of Physiology of Hematophagous Insects
Our group is dedicated to the study of feeding behaviour and of bioactive molecules from blood-sucking insects. We use distinct and complementary approaches to investigate of the feeding process involving electrophysiology and image analysis. These evaluations are complemented by biochemical characterization of molecules present in the insect saliva and midgut that assist in the blood meal and with functional analysis (RNAi) of target genes in vivo.
David Haymer
Professor
CV
Cell and Molecular Biology
University of Hawaii
Honolulu HI USA
dhaymer@hawaii.edu
Haymer lab
Molecular population genetics, molecular taxonomy of species complexes, Bactrocera dorsal is complex, Tephritidae
Owain Edwards
Group Leader, Environmental Genomics
Land & Water
CSIRO
Floreat WA Australia
Owain.Edwards@csiro.au
CSIRO Environmental Genomics
Dr Owain Edwards’ research focuses on aphid-host plant interactions at the level of the organism (both aphid and plant) and the molecule, including work with colleagues in the International Aphid Genomics Consortium (IAGC) to characterise the components of aphid saliva. Dr Edwards’ work as part of the IAGC also includes a focus on epigenetic regulation of aphid polyphenism, in particular the roles of DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs in modulating aphid development. With collaborators at the University of Melbourne, Dr Edwards is investigating novel strategies to control invertebrate pests through better management of insecticide resistance, and by using
Christopher Jones
Associate Professor
Biological Sciences
Moravian College
Bethlehem PA United States
jonesc@moravian.edu

My lab focuses primarily on behavioral genetics, currently a phenotype in Drosophila called "bang-sensitivity," in which subjecting the flies to strong physical shocks (as in a standard lab vortex) triggers seizures.
John Belote
Professor
Biology Department
Syracuse University
Syracuse NY USA
jbelote@syr.edu
Belote Lab
In collaboration with the Scott Pitnick lab (Syracuse University) we are studying mechanisms of post-mating sexual selection in a variety of insects, including Drosophila, Tribolium, sepsids and yellow dung flies.
John Tower
Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
University of Southern California
Los Angeles California United States
jtower@usc.edu
Tower Lab
Gene expression during aging and predictive biomarkers of life span. Sexual antagonistic pleiotropy and p53. MnSOD and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response UPRmt 3D video tracking of flies including GFP
Mitch McVey
Associate professor
Biology
Tufts University
Medford MA USA
mitch.mcvey@tufts.edu
The McVey lab
We use Drosophila to study DNA repair and recombination. We are particularly interested in the mechanisms by which alternative end-joining and recombinational repair of double-strand breaks results in mutagenesis and genome instability.
Mark Guillotte
Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
University of Maryland Baltimore
Baltimore Maryland United States
mguil33@gmail.com

Vector-borne disease
Susan Villarreal
Postdoctoral Associate
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
smv32@cornell.edu
Laura Harrington Lab
Exploring the genetic components to insect mating behavior
George Roderick
Professor and Chair
Environmental Science
UC Berkeley
Berkeley CA USA
roderick@berkeley.edu

Invasive species, population biology, biodiversity, sustainability, biological control, global homogenization
John Rebers
Department Head
CV
Biology
Northern Michigan University
Marquette MI USA
jrebers@nmu.edu

Structure of arthropod cuticular proteins, particularly as related to chitin binding.
Vandana Hivrale
Dr. Vandana Hivrale
CV
Department of Biochemistry and molecular biology
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Ok, USA
Stillwater Oklahoma USA
vandanahivrale@hotmail.com
Biochemistry and molecular biology
At my institute (Department of Biochemistry, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad), we are attempting to screen of non-host Protease inhibitor /Amylase inhibitor proteins for developing Helicoverpa armigera tolerance in important crop plants like pigeonpea, cotton and tomato. In India, H. armigera is responsible for preharvest losses of pigeonpea, chickpea, cotton, tomato, okra etc and storage pests such as callosobruchus and tribolium spp for post harvest damage. One of the sustainable solutions to this problem is development of insect-resistant transgenic plants using two transgenes (PI/AI), however, effect of such transgene expression in these plants has yet to be investigated.
TRANG LE THI DIEU
Dr.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
ltdtrang@hcmuaf.edu.vn
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Seth Donoughe
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
seth.donoughe@gmail.com

Insect development and evolution
Dr. ATUL KUMAR PANDEY
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
Alexander Silberman Institute of life sciences
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
atulkumarpandey@gmail.com
Sociobiology Lab
Sociobiological, physiological and behavioural studies of sleep and its deprivational consequences
Shyh-Chi Chen
Ophthalmology
Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
Cincinnati Ohio USA
shyhchi@gmail.com

circadian rhythm
Magali Eychenne
Entomology
INRA
Montpellier cedex 05 Languedoc Roussillon France
magali.eychenne@univ-montp2.fr
DGIMI
Lepidopteran functionnal genomics
Gianluca Tettamanti
Associate Professor
Department of Biotechnology and Life Sciences
University of Insubria
Varese --- Italy
gianluca.tettamanti@uninsubria.it
Laboratory of Invertebrate Biology
- Cell death and regeneration in insect development - Insect biotechnology - Immune response in insects
Christopher Jones
Dr
AgroEcology
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire United Kingdom
christopher.jones@rothamsted.ac.uk
Post-doctoral Researcher
I have worked with insects of both medical and agricultural importance to understand the genetic basis of phenotypes, and in particular, insecticide resistance. I currently study insect migration in the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera, combining tethered flight assays with genomic approaches to understand the genetic basis of this phenomenon.
Jorge Vieira
Professor
Molecular Evolution Lab
IBMC
Porto Porto Portugal
jbvieira@ibmc.up.pt
Molecular Evolution lab
Molecular Evolution with a focus on Drosophila (including non-melanogaster species).
Monique van Oers
Prof dr
Laboratory of Virology
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland Netherlands
monique.vanoers@wur.nl
Insect Virology
Insect virus host interactions, baculoviruses, SGHV, iridovirus, lepidoptera, Glossinia, Spodoptera exigua, behavioral manipulation, virus entry mechanisms
Nico Posnien
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Lower Saxony Germany
nico.posnien@gmail.com

My main focus of our research is understanding the molecular basis of natural variation in complex morphological traits. We mainly work on insect and spider systems and apply genome wide approaches in combination with classical developmental biology methods.
Raymond St. Leger
Distunguished University Professor
Entomology
University of Maryland
College Park MD USA
stleger@umd.edu
St. Leger
St. Leger has published 145 papers on basic and applied aspects of entomopathogenic fungi ranging from ecology to the complex molecular warfare waged between fungi and their insect victims, and genetic engineering of pathogens to make them much more effective against mosquitoes
Maurijn van der Zee
Dr.
Institute of Biology
Leiden University
Leiden ZH Netherlands
m.van.der.zee@biology.leidenuniv.nl
Van der Zee lab
-comparative genomics and evolution of the TGFbeta ligands -transgenesis, live imaging and blastoderm formation -the function of the serosa in innate immunity
Xi’en Chen
Dr.
College of Plant Protection
Northwest A&F University
Yangling Shannxi China
chenpp2006@nwsuaf.edu.cn

The physiological roles of insect protein phosphatases; molecular basis of physiological changes in insects under abiotic and/or biotic stresses; Xenobiotic resistance in insects resulting from metabolic enzymes and/or target site insensitivity; in vitro degradation of insecticide by insect metabolic enzymes
Giuseppe Saccone
PhD, Assist. Professor
Department of Biology
University Federico II of Naples
Naples Italy Italy
giuseppe.saccone@unina.it
Sex Evo Devo
Evolution of sex determining genes and networks in dipteran species of economic or medical relevance. Molecular entomology and Insect Biotechnology. We have uncovered in the mediterranean fruitly Ceratitis capitata a key epigenetic gene for female sex determination, Cctra(ep), which has an additional autoregulatory function compared to the Drosophila tra orthologue, which lost it. In Ceratitis, as in Drosophila, Cctra(ep) controls the splicing of the downstream doublex and fruitless genes. We and others have found that this evolutionary version of transformer(ep) is a master gene for female sex determination widely conserved in Diptera, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera. We have developed a
Heiko Vogel
Dr.
Department of Entomology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thuringia Germany
hvogel@ice.mpg.de
Research Group Leader
Insect Genomics; Innate Immunity; Molecular Evolution; Plant-Insect Interactions; Detoxification; Insect adaptation to extreme ecological niches.
Elizabeth Walker
Lab Manager/Research Tech Sr.
EEB
University of Michigan
Ann Arbor Michigan United States
walkeliz@umich.edu
Wittkopp Lab
I am broadly interested in evolutionary development and how that plays a role in the diversity of organisms, including gene regulation
Tatiana Torres
Assistant Professor
Genetics and Evolutionary Biology
University of Sao Paulo
Sao Paulo SP Brazil
tttorres@ib.usp.br
Genomics and Evolution of Arthropods
Our research focuses on the investigation of patterns of variability observed in genes and genomes, particularly regulatory variation, and understanding the underlying evolutionary processes involved in the emergence of these patterns. To pursue this we use insects and other arthropods as model organisms.
Cynthia Staber
Sr. Laboratory Manager
Zeitlinger Lab
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Kansas City MO USA
cst@stowers.org
Zeitlinger Lab
I have worked on Segregation Distorter for many years and now work on regulation of developmental timing in the Drosophila embryo.
Philipp Lehmann
Department of Biological and Environmental Science
University of Jyväskylä
Jyväskylä Central Finland Finland
philipp.lehmann@jyu.fi

My research area covers both behavioral and physiological aspects of survival in and expansion to environments with large seasonal fluctuations. I primarily study energetic and immunity related stress responses during insect diapause in high latitude environments.
Mark Rheault
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of British Columbia
Kelowna British Columbia Canada
mark.rheault@ubc.ca
Rheault Lab
Our lab strives to understand how transporting epithelia of insects such as the, salivary glands, midgut, Malpighian tubules, hindgut and anal papillae of various insects play a role in the ionoregulation, osmoregulation, and the excretion of potentially toxic endogeneous or exogenous compounds. In order to elucidate mechanisms responsible for these phenomena our lab uses an integrative approach which includes gene level to to whole organism studies.
Christopher Potter
Assistant Professor
Department of Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Baltimore MD USA
cpotter@jhmi.edu
Potter Lab
We are interested in the neural mechanisms underlying insect olfaction. We have initially focused on Drosophila melanogaster, and will extend our research into Anopheles gambiae.
Steve Stowers
Assistant professor
Cell Biology and Neuroscience
Montana State University
Bozeman Montana United States
sstowers@montana.edu

How sensory information is processed by the nervous system to produce behavioral outputs is a long-standing problem in neuroscience, but one far from being understood. My lab exploits the many advantages of the Drosophila model system to study the relationship between somatosensory input and behavior. Our overall strategy is to first map neural circuits associated with specific somatosensory neurons and then manipulate and measure neuronal activity within the circuit to elucidate the fundamental principles of neuronal circuit logic. Since the depth with which a neural circuit will be understood will correlate with the precision with which it can be manipulated, we
Nicholas Teets
Assistant Professor
CV
Department of Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY USA
n.teets@uky.edu

My research centers on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which insects survive extreme environmental conditions. Specifically I am interested in the signaling mechanisms governing rapid responses to cold and other environmental stress, and how these pathways can be manipulated for pest control. I use an integrative approach to study these questions from multiple levels of biological organization, using cell biology, functional genomics, and transgenic methods to study these pathways in both model and non-model species.
Jose-Luis Martínez-Guitarte
Faculty of Sciences
UNED
Madrid Madrid Spain
jlmartinez@ccia.uned.es
Biology and Environmental Toxicology Lab
Ecotoxicology, cell and molecular biology, endocrine disruption, non-coding RNA
Rahul Rane
Genetics
Bio21, University of Melbourne
Parkville VIC Australia
rahulvrane@gmail.com
Hoffman Lab
My project mainly revolves around tracking the genomic basis of climate adaptation and by extension inspecting adaptive capacity under a climate change model using high throughput ‘next-generation’ sequencing. I study multiple Drosophila species as a result (Sophophora as well as the Repleta group) to ask whether with an increase in global temperatures, will different species adapt to changing conditions on a genomic level? Also what intra and inter specific changes will define this adaptive capacity for ecologically important traits as heat and desiccation tolerance. Along with this I am also developing Drosophila specific softwares and pipelines for accurate and efficient assembly
Elsayed Hafez
Professor
CV
Plant Protection and Biomolecular Diagnosis
City for Scientific Research and technology applications, Arid lands cultivation research institute
Alexandria Alexandria  Egypt
elsayed_hafez@yahoo.com
Molecular Biology Lab
we are interested in studying of the honey bee genome (Egyptian strain).
Michal Zurovec
Dr.
Institute of Entomology
Biology Centre CAS
Ceske Budejovice Czechia Czech Republic
zurovec@entu.cas.cz
Molecular Genetics
Gene mutagenesis by engineered nucleases, Adenosine signaling pathway. We are developing approaches to the investigation of extrinsic controls on tissue growth by using the imaginal discs of Drosophila as a model system.
Gareth Lycett
Vector
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine
Liverpool Merseyside UK
gareth.lycett@lstmed.ac.uk
Lycett Group
I am a vector molecular biologist whose main interests are focused on functional genetic analysis of Anopheles gambiae. The topics explored include cellular and molecular analysis of mosquito/plasmodium interactions, developing tools for conditional expression in transgenic Anophelines, regulation of gene expression in mosquito tissues, and functional genetic analysis of insecticide resistance.
Carlos Gustavo Nunes Silva
Professor
Department of Genetics
Universidade Federal do Amazonas
Manaus Amazonas Brazil
cgmanaus@gmail.com
Lab. DNA technologies
"Beeotechnology"
Martin Hasselmann
Professor
Livestock Population Genomics
University of Hohenheim
Stuttgart Baden-Würtemberg Germany
martin.hasselmann@uni-hohenheim.de
Livestock Population Genomics
Currently, we are using social insect species (including honey-, bumble- and stingless bees) as model to elucidate the molecular basis of evolutionary innovations. These species have evolved several unique biological characteristics and interact with a variety of abiotic and biotic environmental factors. We are interested in the natural variation and the evolutionary processes which provide the basis of modified gene function and phenotypic differentiation.
Wannes Dermauw
Dr.
Crop Protection
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
wannes.dermauw@ugent.be
Acarology
The Acarology lab has a long tradition in studying fundamental and applied aspects of arthropod crop pests. One of the main achievements of our group was the establishment of a new resistance paradigm in arthropods, by documenting the role of heteroplasmy in insecticide resistance (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008). We have also documented the evolutionary adaptation to several xenobiotics, hereby often uncovering the mode of action of agrochemicals in spider mites (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008, 2012, Dermauw et al. 2012). In recent years, our group was one of the key players in a collaborative project to sequence and
Salva Herrero
Associate Professor
Department of Genetics
Universitat de Valencia
Burjassot Valencia España
sherrero@uv.es
GenBqBt Insect-Pathogen Interaction
Studies in our group aim to determine and characterize the components involved in the interaction of Lepidoptera larvae with their pathogens as well as determine novel proteins and mechanisms that could also contribute to reduce the detrimental effects of the pathogens. We are mainly focused on the study of the response of the Lepidoptera Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) to two entomopathogens such as Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus. In this context, our main objectives are: • Development of genetic tools for the study of pathogen interaction with S. exigua. • Characterization of tritrophic interactions in the mode of action of B. thuringiensis
Gregor Bucher
Professor
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
gbucher1@uni-goettingen.de
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
I am interested in the developmental genetics of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum with a focus on the evolution of development. The current topics of the lab are: 1. Large scale RNAi screen "iBeetle" 2. Genetics of insect head development 3. Evolution of neural stem cells of the central complex 4. Pattern formation during meetamorphosis. 5. Development of transgenic tools (misexpression, in vivo imaging, etc).
Thierry Brévault
Dr
Entomology
CIRAD
Dakar Dakar Senegal
brevault@cirad.fr

Entomology and Ecology
Ben Matthews
Neurogenetics and Behavior
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
bmatthews@rockefeller.edu

I study the neural and genetic basis of behavior in Aedes aegypti, focusing on the sensory biology of oviposition (egg-laying). I use a combination of transcriptome profiling, loss-of-function genetics, and quantitative behavioral assays to examine the effect of specific genes on oviposition behavior. We have recently adapted the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Aedes aegypti, allowing us quickly and efficiently generate mutations via non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Ultimately, I hope to use this technology to study the neural circuits underlying genetically encoded behaviors in disease vectors such as Aedes aegypti.
Frank Criscione
Entomology
University of Maryland
Rockville MD USA
fcris@umd.edu

Enhancer trap technologies and mosquito hematology.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Peter Armbruster
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC USA
paa9@georgetown.edu
Armbruster
Research in my lab is focused on understanding processes of phenotypic evolution in natural populations and the molecular bases of adaptation. Our approach to these questions is integrative. We perform a wide range of studies, including field ecology, quantitative and population genetics, and molecular physiology. We are currently studying the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus, a vector of both dengue fever and Chikungunya virus. Our research intersects with a variety of topics in both invasive species biology and medical entomology, and we are particularly interested in novel approaches that lie at the interface of these
Brenda Oppert
Research Molecular Biologist
CV
Stored Products Insects Research Unit
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
Manhattan KS USA
bso@ksu.edu
BeetleLab
Although my background is protein chemistry, in 2007 our lab research focus shifted to high throughput sequencing to address functional genomics related to stored product insects. We now use sequencing in the evaluation of differential gene expression in insects fed microbial toxins or protease inhibitors, among others. We also were involved in the annotation of the Tribolium genome, particularly protease genes, and now are working with collaborators to sequence the genome of the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica. To evaluate data from these sequencing projects, we have developed data management infrastructure and analysis algorithms for in-house bioinformatics.
Carolyn McBride
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ USA
lmcbride@rockefeller.edu

The molecular, neural, and evolutionary basis of insect behavior
Ada Rafaeli
Associate Director , Prof.
Academic Affairs and International Cooperation
Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center
Bet Dagan NONE ISRAEL
vtada@volcani.agri.gov.il
Insect Physiology Lab, Department of food quality and safety
Physiological, biochemical and molecular regulatory mechanisms of insect reproductive behavior, particularly in lepidopterans
Luc Swevers
Dr
Biosciences & Applications
NCSR "Demokritos"
Aghia Paraskevi (Athens) Attiki Greece
swevers@bio.demokritos.gr
Insect Molecular Genetics and Biotechnology
1) Molecular analysis of the developmental program that directs follicular cell differentiation during oogenesis in silkmoths : in vitro culture of ovarioles, molecular analysis of ecdysone response, analysis of transcription factor function, functional analysis of the nuclear receptor BmE75 during the transition from vitellogenesis to choriogenesis. 2) Analysis of small RNA pathways in lepidopteran insects: the RNA-binding proteins R2D2 and Translin. Development of methods to increase the efficiency of RNAi in lepidopteran insects. 3) Development of methods for control of insect pests: development of baculoviruses as transformation vectors, exploration of transposable elements for insect transformation, environmental RNAi, insect growth regulators. 4)
Sara Oppenheim
NSF Postdoctoral Fellow
Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics
American Museum of Natural History
NY NY USA
saraoppenheim@gmail.com

The evolution of host plant use and diet breadth in specialists and generalists.
Paul Linser
Professor of Cell Biology
Whitney Laboratory
University of Florida
Saint Augustine Florida USA
pjl@whitney.ufl.edu
Linser Lab
Cell biology of a number of organismal systems. In regard to mosquitoes, my group has focused on epithelial physiology and cell biology as it impacts alimentary canal function. Tools we use include transcriptomics, electrophysiology, advanced imaging (light microscopy), general molecular biology.
Emilie Pondeville
Dr
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
Glasgow Glasgow Scotland, UK
emilie.pondeville@glasgow.ac.uk

Reproduction and immunity in mosquito vectors using genetic tools
Don Champagne
Associate Professor
Entomology/Center for Tropical and Emerging Global Diseases
University of Georgia
Athens Georgia USA
dchampa@uga.edu
Champagne Lab
I am interested in characterizing salivary factors that facilitate blood feeding by arthropods. More specifically, I am interested in proteins and peptides that modulate vertebrate hemostatic, inflammatory, and immune responses.
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Ioannis Eleftherianos
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
The George Washington University
Washington DC USA
ioannise@gwu.edu
Insect Infection and Immunity
Our lab uses a tripartite system consisting of three model organisms: an insect, Drosophila; the entomopathogenic (or insect pathogenic) nematode Heterorhabditis; and its symbiotic bacterium Photorhabdus, to investigate the molecular and evolutionary basis of insect immunity, bacterial symbiosis/pathogenicity and nematode parasitism, and to understand the basic principles of the complex interactions between these important biological processes. This system promises to reveal not only how pathogens evolve virulence but also how two pathogens can come together to exploit a common host.
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
Juan Luis Jurat-Fuentes
Associate Professor
Entomology and Plant Pathology
University of Tennessee
Knoxville TN USA
jurat@utk.edu

Our research is focused on the physiology of the insect gut, particularly the molecular characterization of interactions between the gut epithelium and insecticidal Cry toxins produced by the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), the identification of novel enzymes for biofuel production, and the characterization of the gut regenerative response after pathogenic attack.
Julie Reynolds
Postdoctoral Researcher
Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
reynolds.473@osu.edu
Postdoctoral Researcher
Molecular, Biochemical, and Physiological aspects of diapause.
Paul Eggleston
Prof.
Life Sciences
Keele University
Keele Staffs. UK
p.eggleston@keele.ac.uk
Molecular Entomology
My research interests are in molecular entomology, particularly the molecular genetics of mosquitoes that transmit human disease and their complex interactions with the parasites and viruses that cause disease. Because of their medical importance, the focus of my group is on the malaria vector mosquito, Anopheles gambiae and the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. Current projects include the development of technologies for genetic engineering of mosquitoes, the creation of genetically modified mosquitoes that are compromised in their ability to transmit disease and the development of strategies for stage- and tissue-specific gene expression within genetically modified mosquitoes. My research has attracted
Cassandra Extavour
Associate Professor
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA United States
extavour@oeb.harvard.edu
Extavour Lab
My lab is interested in the evolution of early embryonic development. We focus primarily on the evolution and development of reproductive systems, including both the germ line and the somatic components of the gonad. We use molecular genetic developmental analysis, histological analysis, and experimental embryology to study early animal embryogenesis, germ cell specification, and gonad development in several different invertebrate model systems. Our main goal is to understand the evolution of the genetic mechanisms that enabled the evolution of multicellularity, and how these mechanisms employed during early embryogenesis in extant organisms to specify cell fate, development and differentiation.
Rachel Wiltshire
PhD Candidate
Dept. of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
rwiltshi@nd.edu

Passionate, energetic mosquito DNA geek seeking to contribute to malaria vector control in Uganda and the Solomon Islands.
Marc F. Schetelig
Professor / Head of Emmy Noether and Fraunhofer Attract Group
Department of Insect Biotechnology in Plant Protection
Justus-Liebig-University Gießen / Fraunhofer IME
Institute for Insect Biotechnology
Giessen Hessen Germany
marc.schetelig@agrar.uni-giessen.de
Schetelig lab
General research interests are developmental biology, the development of pest control systems and the evaluation and comparison of transgenic systems for improving integrated pest management programs.
Naomi Pierce
Hessel Professor of Biology
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
npierce@oeb.harvard.edu
Pierce lab
Research in the Pierce lab focuses on the behavioral ecology of insect interactions, including mutualisms between social insects and other species, microbiota/ host associations, and insect/plant coevolution. We’ve used molecular characters to reconstruct the evolutionary history of a range of insects (mostly ants, bees, butterflies and moths), and comparative methods to study adaptation and life history evolution, biogeography, rates of diversification and patterns of community assembly. At a functional level, we are also exploring proximate mechanisms underlying trade-offs in a model genetic plant–pathogen–insect system, as well as the interplay of genetics and the environment in the evolution of social behavior
Daniel Sonenshine
Professor (Emeritus)
Biological Sciences
Old Dominion University
Norfolk Virginia United States
dsonensh@odu.edu
Tick Lab
Neurobiology of ticks; transcriptomics; neuropeptides, neurotransmitters; tick-borne pathogens; innate immunity; pheromones.
Christina Schulte
CV
Heinrich-Heine University
Evolutionary Genetics
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
christina-schulte@gmx.de

Honeybee workers show altruistic behaviors in contrast to queens and drones, which show behaviors that are related to reproduction. The collective behaviors of the worker bees produce group phenotypes that allow them to remain well-adapted in a changing environment. These worker specific behaviors have been largely described but we have little understanding of the molecular control that specifies these behaviors in the brain during development, and of its evolution that gave rise to social behaviors during the last 60 million years. Differentiation of the worker brain is specified by female- and caste-determining signals. The sex-determining signal is implemented by Feminizer protein
Yoosook Lee
Pathology, Immunology and Microbiology
University of California - Davis
Davis CA United States
yoslee@ucdavis.edu
Vector Genetics Laboratory
Population genomics of malaria vectors. Population genetics of mosquitoes
Adam Dolezal
Postdoctoral Researcher
Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
adolezal@gmail.com

I am interested in the interaction of various stressors, particularly nutrition and pathogens, on honey bee health, as well as how these factors affect other pollinator species.
Maohua Chen
Prof.
CV
Department of Entomology
Northwest A&F University
Yangling Shaanxi Province China
maohua.chen@nwsuaf.edu.cn
Insecticide Resistance and Insect Population Genetics
I am using molecular markers (microstatellites, mitochondrial genes and other makers) to investigate how environmental and anthropogenic factors affect the genetic diversity, genetic structure and gene flow pattern of insect populations.
Micky Mwamuye
Molecular Biology & Bioinformatics Unit/Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab
International Centre of insect Physiology and Ecology
Nairobi Nairobi Kenya
mmwamuye@icipe.org
Postgraduate Student
My current research focus is on the biodiversity of Ticks and tick-borne zoonoses at human-livestock-wildlife interfaces.
Kasim George
Post doctoral fellow
Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Maryland College Park
Institute for Bioscience & Biotechnology Research
Rockville Maryland USA
kigeorge@umd.edu
O'Brochta Group IBBR
My research interest focuses on host-pathogen interaction. Specifically, I am investigating the interaction of the human malaria pathogen, Plasmodium falciparum and the arthropod vector Anopheles stephensi. Using transgenic technology, I aim to modify to innate immune system of A. stephensi, to increase the intensity of P. falciparum infection for live attenuated sporozoites vaccine development.
Marten Edwards
Assoc. Professor
Biology
Muhlenberg College
Allentown PA USA
edwards@muhlenberg.edu
Edwards
I am interested in corpora allata expression in Aedes aegypti. I have prepared 8 constructs that contain 1-3 kb upstream regions of JH biosynthetic enzyme genes fused to EGFP and would like to test them in transgenic Ae. aegypti. If anyone is interested in collaborating with me to test these constructs, please contact me.
Christine Merlin
Assistant Professor
Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station Texas USA
cmerlin@bio.tamu.edu
Merlin Lab
In our laboratory, we use the eastern North American migratory monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) as a model system to study animal clock mechanisms and the role of circadian clocks in a fascinating biological output, the animal long-distance migration. The recent sequencing of the monarch genome and the establishment of genetic tools to knockout clock genes (and others) in vivo using nuclease-mediated gene targeting approaches provides us with a unique opportunity to uncover the molecular and cellular underpinnings of the butterfly clockwork, its migratory behavior and their interplay.
Antonia Monteiro
Associate Professor
CV
Biological Sciences
National University of Singapore
Singapore Singapore Singapore
antonia.monteiro@nus.edu.sg
Monteiro Lab
We seek to understand the evolution of morphological novelties by focusing on the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns. Research in the lab addresses both the ultimate selective factors that favor particular wing patterns, as well as the proximate mechanisms that generate those patterns. We combine tools from ethology, population genetics, phylogenetics, and developmental biology to understand the nature of the variation underlying developmental mechanisms within or between species, and why species display their particular color patterns. Our model organisms (so far) have been African satyrid butterflies in the genus Bicyclus, other nymphalids, pierid butterflies, and saturniid moths.
Kevin Nyberg
Biology
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park MD USA
kevingnyberg@gmail.com

I am currently researching the expression and evolution of long noncoding RNAs in the genus Drosophila.
Wayne Hunter
Research Entomologist
Subtropical Insects Research Unit
USDA-ARS
Fort Pierce Florida USA
wayne.hunter@ars.usda.gov
U.S. Horticultural Research Lab
RNAi to manage hemipteran pests, Psyllid & Leafhopper Genomics. Viral pathogens, cell culture.
Susanta Behura
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
sbehura@nd.edu

My work focuses on insect genetics and genomics. My primary interests are on functional and evolutionary genomics of vector competence of Aedes aegypti to dengue virus infection. Other specific areas of interest are 1) Comparative genomics, 2) Transcriptomics 3) Codon bias and translational selection, 4) Mitochondria and Numt, 5) Transposable elements and repeat sequences, 6) Non-coding RNAs, 7) Genome sequencing and analysis, and genome-wide association studies.
Brian Lovett
Graduate Student
Entomology Department
University of Maryland
College Park MD United States
lovettbr@umd.edu
St. Leger Lab
Brian Lovett is a PhD student studying mycology and genetics in agricultural and vector biology systems. He is currently working on projects analyzing mycorrhizal interactions in agricultural systems and the transcriptomics of malaria vector mosquitoes.
Thomas Werner
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
twerner@mtu.edu
Werner Lab
Evo-devo and toxicology in Drosophila. Please visit: http://www.mtu.edu/biological/department/faculty/werner/
Nicole Gerardo
Assistant Professor
Biology
Emory University
Atlanta GA - Georgia United States
nicole.gerardo@emory.edu
The Gerardo Lab
Our lab's focus is on the evolutionary ecology of interactions between microbes and hosts. We are interested in how both beneficial and harmful microbes establish and maintain relationships with their hosts. Such associations are shaped by ecological limitations on host range, evolutionary trade-offs for both hosts and microbes, and host immunology. We combine genomics, phylogenetics and experimental approaches to study these forces in diverse insect-microbe systems.
Jay Evans
Research Scientist
Bee Research Laboratory
USDA-ARS
Beltsville MD USA
jay.evans@ars.usda.gov
Bee Research Lab
We study honey bee traits linked with disease and stress resistance, and use genetic and genomic techniques to understand honey bee health as well as the virulence traits and biologics of parasites and pathogens of bees. Current projects include honey bee resistance to gut parasites, interactions among members of the bee microbiome, and genomic analyses of a key honey bee parasite, the mite Varroa destructor.
Yehuda Ben-Shahar
Assistant Professor
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis Missouri USA
benshahary@wustl.edu
Ben-Shahar lab at Wash U
We are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity on three major time scales: evolutionary, Developmental and Physiological. We address these questions with the powerful genetic model Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), and the emerging model for complex social behaviors, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Research approaches in the lab include behavior, genetics, genomics, molecular and cellular biology, and neurophysiology.
Claude Desplan
Professor
CV
Biology
NYU
New York New York United States
cd38@nyu.edu
Molecular Genetics
EVO-DEVO: Evolution of axis formation using the wasp Nasonia. Different strategies are used in insects to establish embryonic polarity. In the ancestral short-germ mode of development, nuclei fated to become the embryo are restricted to the posterior end of the egg while the anterior of the egg develops as extra-embryonic membranes. Only anterior segments are patterned at the syncytial blastoderm while abdominal segments form in a posterior growth zone. This system relies on a single posterior morphogenetic center whereby a localized posterior determinant (nanos) is responsible for forming gradients of factors that pattern head and thorax. In the derived long-germ
Badrul Arefin
Molecular Biosciences
Stockholm University
Stockholm   Sweden
badrul.arefin@su.se
Ulrich Theopold
I am interested in to understand the molecular and the cellular mechanisms involved in the response against nematode infections in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am working on insect immunity, particularly Drosophila immunity towards entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN). Until now, our knowledge on Drosophila immunity mostly comes from studies of bacterial and fungal infections. However, nematode parasites are considered one the biggest threats to human health, causing diseases leading to death. Even when they are not killing, they could stay in the host and cause chronic diseases. Lymphatic filariasis is such an example which is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti (filarial nematode).
Kevin Temeyer
Research Molecular Biologist
CV
Agricultural Research Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Kerrville Texas USA
kevin.temeyer@ars.usda.gov
Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory
Incumbent is a Research Molecular Biologist in the Livestock Insects Research Unit of the Knipling-Bushland U.S. Livestock Insects Research Laboratory, Kerrville, Texas. The research is a component of ARS National Program 104 – Veterinary, Medical and Urban Entomology. Incumbent is Lead Scientist for the Biting Fly CRIS Project with objectives to 1) develop new attractants, repellents, and behavior modifying chemicals based on physiology of chemical reception; 2) evaluate efficacy of novel technologies for control of flies; and 3) determine interactions between flies and microorganisms that affect survival of the insects and their capability to transmit pathogens. Incumbent is Lead Scientist
Jennifer Gleason
Associate Professor
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS USA
jgleason@ku.edu

My lab focuses on the genetics of behavior, primarily in Drosophila. We are interested in the genetic changes resulting in behavioral isolation between species. To that end, we study courtship behaviors, primarily acoustic signals (courtship song) and pheromones.
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón
VectorBase Scientific Liaison/Outreach Manager
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
ggiraldo@nd.edu
VectorBase
I teach scientist at all career stages, students, postdocs, technicians, researchers, and faculty, how to use VectorBase data, tools and resources. I also teach how to manually annotate genes to submit them in VectorBase, we currently use Artemis but will soon host WebApollo too. Our developers are currently working on VectorBase Galaxy, soon will be teaching how to use it too.
Dominic Esposito
Director
Protein Expression Laboratory
Frederick National Lab for Cancer Research
Frederick MD USA
dom.esposito@fnlcr.nih.gov
Protein Expression Laboratory
Generation of recombinant DNA and proteins in support of the National Cancer Institute's RAS initiative.
Anthony A. James
Distinguished Professor
Micro. Molec. Genet. and Molec. Biol. Biochem.
University of California
Irvine CA USA
aajames@uci.edu

We research vector-parasite interactions, mosquito molecular biology and practical approaches to controlling vector-borne diseases. We use molecular-genetic tools to develop synthetic approaches to interrupt pathogen transmission by mosquitoes. Our group developed mosquito transgenesis procedures and engineered genes that interfere with malaria parasite development in mosquitoes. We collaborated to develop RNAi-mediated approaches to prevent dengue virus transmission and population-suppression strains based on flightless females. We use bioinformatics to study the evolution of control DNA involved in regulating genes involved in hematophagy. We have a strong interest in what it takes to move laboratory science from the laboratory to the field.
Björn Brembs
Prof. Dr.
Institute of Zoology - Neurogenetics
Universität Regensburg
Regensburg Bavaria Germany
bjoern@brembs.net

We are interested in the neurobiology of spontaneous behavioral choice and operant learning.
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Josephine Reinhardt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Biology
University of Maryland College Park
College Park MD USA
reinharj@umd.edu
http://igtrcn.org/participant/gerald-wilkinson/
I am currently studying several aspects of the genomics of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), which are best known as a model for sexual selection and meiotic drive. Recently, it was also discovered the T. dalmanni have a sex chromosome distinct from both the ancestral X and the X in Drosophila, making them an interesting comparative model for aspects of sex-chromosome evolution. We recently released a transcriptome assembly as part of an analysis that identified genes that are differentially regulated in males carrying a driving sex chromosome. We are currently assembling and annotating the T. dalmanni genome.
Prof. Dr. Ernst A. Wimmer
CV
Department of Developmental Biology
Georg-August University Goettingen
Goettingen Lower Saxony Germany
ewimmer@gwdg.de
Developmental Biology and Insect Biotechnology
The research in the department of developmental biology covers a variety of developmental and physiological processes (e.g. head development, brain development, limb development, segmentation, germ cell differentiation, development and function of stink glands, as well as olfaction), their molecular basis, and their evolutionary conservation or diversification. In addition, novel approaches to insect pest management are developed using developmental genes and molecular biology tools. The animal model systems used at the department include a series of arthropods: insects, crustaceans, spiders.
Steve Paterson
Professor
CV
Centre for Genomic Research
University of Liverpool
Liverpool Merseyside UK
s.paterson@liv.ac.uk
Centre for Genomic Research
Genomics and population genetics, particularly of host-parasite interactions. Bioinformatics, including RNAseq, de novo assembly and annotation. Sequenced Plodia interpunctella genome.
Mr. Shreeharsha Tarikere
Biology
IISER Pune
pune maharashtra india
harsha_tts1@yahoo.co.uk

Wing development in insects with focus on lepidoptera
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
LJ Zwiebel
Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Vanderbilt University/Medical Center
Nashville TN USA
l.zwiebel@vanderbilt.edu
LJZlab
We are examining the molecular events of olfaction as this sensory modality predominates most of the relevant behaviors in ants as well as host preference and several other behaviors in mosquitoes to thereby make significant impact to vectorial capacity. Working together with several outstanding collaborators here at Vanderbilt and around the world, we are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which insects transduce chemical signals from their environment into neuronal activity and ultimately behavior. Within Anopheles, we focus specifically on the genetic basis for anthropophily- the characteristic preference for human biting that significantly drives malaria transmission by An. gambiae.
David Marcey
Fletcher Jones Professor of Developmental Biology
CV
Biology
California Lutheran University
Thousand Oaks California USA
marcey@clunet.edu
Marcey Lab
The compound eye of Drosophila melanogaster consists of about 800 ommatidia in a polar arrangement around the dorsoventral (D-V) midline. Each ommatidium consists of eight photoreceptor cells arranged in a trapezoidal fashion with two mirror-symmetric forms, a dorsal form above the D-V midline, and a ventral form below. When differentiation of the ommatidia begins within the epithelium of the third instar larval eye-antennal imaginal disc, each ommatidium is a bilaterally symmetrical cluster of photoreceptor precursors polarized in the anteroposterior axis. These precursors become polarized on the D-V axis by proto-ommatidium rotation. The establishment of polarity along the D-V axis requires
Koen Venken
Assistant Professor
Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Baylor College of Medicine
Houston TX United States
kv134369@bcm.edu
Team Venken
Genetic Manipulation, Genome Engineering, Synthetic Biology, and Human Disease Modeling in Drosophila melanogaster
William Reid
Post Doctoral Associate
CV
Entomology
University of Maryland
IBBR
Rockville MD USA
wzr0005@tigermail.auburn.edu
O'Brochta lab
Working with forward genetic technologies in Anopheles stephensi
Rob Harrell Robert Harrell
ITF Manager
undergraduate
Insect Transformation Facility
IBBR-University of Maryland
Rockville Maryland United States
harrelr@umd.edu
University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility
The University of Maryland Insect Transformation Facility (UM-ITF) provides functional genomics researchers access to transgenic and non-transgenic genome altering technologies. The techniques for altering insect genomes have been available for many years however they have not been widely used, mainly because the technology requires a high level of expertise and specialized equipment. The mission of the UM-ITF is to aid researchers in the creation of genetically modified insects through; fee for service microinjection of insects with developed genome altering protocols, collaboration to develop genome altering protocols for insects without such protocols, training for researchers who are interested in
Channa Aluvihare
Research Technician
technician
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland College Park at Shady Grove
Rockville MD USA
aluvihar@umd.edu
Insect Transformation Facility
Insect rearing for genetic modification, genetically modified organisms and gene delivery systems.
Dr. Marcé Lorenzen
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
marce_lorenzen@ncsu.edu
Marce Lorenzen Lab
To elucidate the molecular mechanism that underlies a class of novel selfish-genetic element found only in Tribolium. Due to the selfish behavior of these elements they have potential as gene "drivers" to push pesticide susceptibility into populations of insect pests of crops, or vector incompetence into populations of insect vectors of disease.
Alfred Handler
Research Geneticist
faculty
Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Gainesville FL United States
al.handler@ars.usda.gov
none
Our research is focused on understanding and manipulating the genes of tephritid fruit flies, a group of invasive pests of significant agricultural importance. We study transposable elements and their use as vectors for germ-line transformation, and development of new vector systems for genomic targeting and transgene stability.
Dr. Christina Grozinger
Professor of Entomology
faculty
Department of Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
College of Agricultural Sciences
University Park PA United States
cmgrozinger@psu.edu
Grozinger Lab
My program seamlessly integrates research, education, outreach and service related to the biology and health of honey bees and other pollinators.  My research addresses both basic and applied questions, using a highly trans-disciplinary approach encompassing genomics, physiology, neurobiology, behavior, and chemical ecology.  My program consists of two main areas of study, which examine the mechanisms underlying social behavior and health in honey bees and related species.  Our studies on social behavior seek to elucidate the proximate and ultimate mechanisms that regulate complex chemical communication systems in insect societies.  Our studies on honey bee health examine how biotic and abiotic stressors
Dr. Jamie Walters
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Kansas
Lawrence KS United States
jrwalters@ku.edu
James R. Walters Profile
The adaption and speciation in the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Dr. Kristin Michel
Associate Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
kmichel@ksu.edu
Michel Lab
We study the innate immune system of insect vectors and how it relates to the pathogens these insects transmit. In addition, we continue to expand the molecular tool box for non-model insects to identify intrinsic factors of vector competence.
Dr. Zach N. Adelman
Associate Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
zachadel@tamu.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in my laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.