Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Kevin Deem
Mr.
Biology
Miami University
Oxford Ohio United States
deemkd@miamioh.edu
Tomoyasu Lab
Because of a large gap in the fossil record, a debate on the origin of insect wings has roared on for more than 200 years between two competing hypotheses: tergal or pleural origin. Recent molecular evidence has provided support for a dual-origin of insect wings. I aim to investigate the contribution of two distinct wing serial homologs to ectopic wing formation in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, to further inform the dual-origin hypothesis of insect wings. Tribolium castaneum is an emerging model system which has been shown to bare two distinct wing serial homologs on the wingless first thoracic
Desalegn Tadese Mengistu
Medical Parasitology and Entomology
College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University
Mekelle Tigrai Ethiopia
desalegn.tadesse@mu.edu.et

Insecticide Resistance Pattern of Anopheles Vectors
chithravel vadivalagan
Molecular Entomology, Pest and Parasites Insects
CV
Zoology
Bharathiar University
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
marinedrug.9@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
My field of interest includes Molecular Ecology, Evolutionary genetics of vector born diseases and their potential vectors control by using biosynthesized Nanoparticles. I am much interested in Genomics of pest, parasites and novel haplotype variations for adaptive radiation of vector born diseases
Adriana Adolfi
Postdoc
Microbiology & Molecular Genetics
University of California Irvine
Irvine California United States
adriana.adolfi@uci.edu
James Lab
Gene drives for population replacement in the malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi
Ayman Ahmed
Mr
CV
Vector Biology
Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (LSTM)
Liverpool Merseyside United Kingdom
zoologist05@gmail.com
Vector behaviour and genomics
Mosquito Population genetics and Mosquito-borne Viral Diseases.
Ewald Große-Wilde
Evolutionary Neuroethology
MPI for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thüringen Germany
ewald.grosse.wilde@gmail.com

Arthropod chemosensation.
Matthew Edgington
Dr
Artropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
matt.edgington@pirbright.ac.uk

Mainly working on mathematical modelling of engineered underdominance gene drive systems in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes but also some other classes of gene drive.
David Dolezel
Instiute of Entomology
Biology Center
Ceske Budejovice Czech Republic Czech Republic
david.dolezel@entu.cas.cz

In our group we are mainly interested in understanding insect seasonality – diapause; architecture of photoperiodic timer (at molecular, genetic and cellular levels), geographic variability of the photoperiodic timer, Juvenile hormone signaling in reproduction of insects. The classical genetic models, such as D. melanogaster, display only poor photoperiodic response. Therefore we are trying to "bring" genetic tools to insect species with robust seasonal response. Our favorite organism is the linden bug (fire bug), Pyrrhocoris apterus. In this species we are mainly in terested in: endocrinology (neuropeptides, evolution of neuropeptide receptors), reproductive behavior, circadian clock, phylogeography of P. apterus and its adaptation.
Debdeep Dutta
Department of Molecular and Human Genetics
B.H.U.
Varanasi Uttar Pradesh India
debdeep.brc@gmail.com

Currently, I am working on regulation of Notch signaling and its crosstalk with other signaling pathways
Neal Dittmer
Research Assistant Professor
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas USA
ndittmer@ksu.edu

I’m interested in exploring how insects make their cuticle (exoskeleton). My main focus is on the proteins present in the cuticle and how they differ between cuticle that is hard versus cuticle that is flexible. I am also interested on how these cuticular proteins may be cross-linked together to help stabilize the cuticle (a process known as sclerotization). One important enzyme in this process is laccase, a member of the multicopper oxidase (MCO) family. Many insects have multiple MCO genes and their physiological functions are unknown but likely extend beyond sclerotization. Understanding how the insect cuticle is made may lead
Ramkumar Govindaraju
Dr
Biotechnology
Periyar University, Salem, TN, India
Salem Tamil Nadu India
rkentomology@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Toxicology Laboratory
My research is concerned with the biochemical, molecular and proteomic study in the evolution of Insecticide resistance among mosquitoes and to identify novel molecules for insect control. My work includes molecular and proteomic analysis, in addition to understanding the gene expression pattern of detoxification enzymes. Mainly my research focuses on the role of cytochrome P450 and esterase genes in conferring insecticides resistance in mosquitoes and agricultural insects.
Narender Dhania
M.Sc.
CV
Department of Animal Biology
School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad
Hyderabad Andhra Pradesh India
warlock.naren@gmail.com

Assessment of midgut regeneration in lepidopteran larvae upon Cry toxin intoxication.
Iliya Ndams
Prof.
Department of Zoology
Ahmadu Bello University Zaria
Zaria Kaduna State Nigeria
isndams@abu.edu.ng
Parasitology/Entomology Research Laboratory
Ecology and control of mosquitoes, tseste fly, blackfly, sandfly
Travis van Warmerdam
Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entemology and Plant Pathology
Mississippi State University
Starkville MS United States
tcv34@msstate.edu
King Lab
I am interested in developing transgenic methods for the manipulation of invertebrate genomes. I am currently developing a gene drive plasmid in a Coleopteran species.
AKASHATA DAWANE
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
GBPUAT PANTNAGAR
NAGPUR MAHARASHTRA INDIA
dawaneakshata@gmail.com

I AM NOT DOING RESEARCH YET BUT VERY INTERESTED IN ENTOMOLOGY AND INSECT BIOTECHNOLOGY AND LOOK FORWARD TO BE A PART OF IT
G Sharath Chandra
PDF
CV
Biotechnology (Molecular Entomology)
University of Kentucky
Lexington Kentucky United States
sharathgsc@gmail.com
Entomology Lab
RNA interference (RNAi) mediated management of Insect pests; Development of Transgenic plants for pest resistance, drought tolerance; Nutritional quality improvement.
Nahid Borhani Dizaji
Post doc fellow
molecular microbiology and immunology
Johns Hopkins University , School of public health
Baltimore MD United States
nborhan1@jhu.edu

my focus interest is on different aspects of vector biology like mosquito-pathogen interactions and dissection of mosquito immunity to Plasmodium and dengue virus infection with emphasis on developing novel strategies against mosquito born disease vectors. As a current post doc fellow I am working on generating of transgenic mosquitoes.
Olawale Adeyinka
Molecular Biology, CEMB
University of Punjab, Pakistan
Lahore Punjab Pakistan
adeyinka.olawale@gmail.com
Seed Biotechnology
to develop a biotechnology technique that would be efficient to transform Africa indigenous crop against insect pest
Sarah Woodard
Assistant Professor
Department of Entomology
University of California, Riverside
Riverside California USA
hollis.woodard@ucr.edu
Woodard Lab
My research group uses bees as a model system for understanding the proximate mechanisms underlying adaptation, sensitivity, and resilience, with a focus on the behavior, physiology, and population dynamics of native bees in rapidly changing and extreme environments. We primarily use the bumble bee system for experimental research.
Elizabeth Brandt
Entomology
University of Maryland
Potomac MD USA
brandte13@gmail.com

Metabolic detox pathways of insects
Mary Adewole
Miss
CV
Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology
University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo Nigeria
modupeadewole75@gmail.com
Entomology Laboratory
MY ACADEMIC RESEARCH FOCUS I am a young graduate female researcher with a Bachelor’s Degree in Agriculture (Crop protection) from the Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta (2010). I have concluded a Master of Science Degree (2015) (Entomology) in the Department of Crop Protection and Environmental Biology, University of Ibadan with a Ph.D grade. Quest for more knowledge and desire to be an academia, a researcher and voice to reckon with in in the academic research world (Agriculture) have informed my stride to apply for further study to acquire Ph.D. I have been offered
Igor Medici de Mattos
Ph.D.
Department of Ecology Evolution and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem Jerusalem  Israel
igormmattos@yahoo.com.br

I'm interested in a variety of aspects concerning honey bees (Apis mellifera) genetics. I'm also involved in research addressing honey bee behavior and physiology.
Aniruddha Pandit
Mr
College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences
University of Glasgow
Glasgow Scotland United Kingdom
Aniruddha.Pandit@glasgow.ac.uk

Bioinformatics, Transcriptomics, Pest Management, Entomology
Julian Dow
Professor
College of Medical, Veterinary & Life Sciences
University of Glasgow
GLASGOW UNITED KINGDOM United Kingdom
julian.dow@glasgow.ac.uk
Dow/Davies labs
We are interested in exploiting genetics and transgenic technologies to understand how the organism works. Our particular focus is in organismal homeostasis, and thus the renal system. Most of our work is in Drosophila.
sanket deshmukh
AGROCHEMICAL AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY
nagpur maharstra india
sssanketdeshmukh@gmail.com

insilico study for pest managment
kanakala surapathrudu
post doctoral Research fellow
Department of Entomology
Agricultural Research Organization
Bet Dagan, Israel. Israel Israel
kanakalavit@gmail.com

RNAi
Sonja Lindner
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
sonja.lindner@uni-goettingen.de

My aim is to study the RNAi process in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum and to apply results to agricultural insect pests.
Andrew Hammond
Research Associate
Life Sciences
Imperial College London
London Greater London United Kingdom
andrew.hammond08@imperial.ac.uk
Crisanti Lab
Gene drives in the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae
S Sundar
Dr.
Protect Our Environment Trust
Non-Governmental Organisation
Coimbatore Tamil Nadu India
sun76dar@yahoo.co.in

Aquatic insects in various aspects include taxonomy, systematics, ecological, biological etc. My research interests is not confined into the aspects I have worked so far it extends to focus on aquatic insects genome studies which will provide enormous insights into insect biology.Besides, investigations on aquatic insects models can provide biological insights relevant to other organisms and it would lead to important discoveries like other aquatic organisms or invertebrates in many areas of research such as immunology, neurobiology and behaviour. Using insects as models will offer many advantages, including their short life cycle, simple anatomy and cost-effectiveness due to the ease
Robert Reed
Associate Professor
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Cornell University
Ithaca New York United States
robertreed@cornell.edu
Reed Lab
Our lab studies the evolution and development of butterfly wing patterns.
Jeff Demuth
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
University of Texas at Arlington
Arlington Texas United States
jpdemuth@uta.edu
Demuth Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics. Speciation. Sex chromosome evolution. Gene family evolution. Sexual selection.
Era Vaidya
Dr
Biotic Stress Resistance
National Research Centre on Plant Biotechnology
New Delhi New Delhi India
vaidya.era@gmail.com

I am working on using RNA silencing strategies for control of Helicoverpa armigera, which a polyphagous pest of many crop plants
Vakil Ahmad
Dr.
Division of Biological Sciences
University of Missouri
Columbia Missouri USA
v.ahmad@outlook.com
Zhang Bing Laboratory
I am focused on the role of glial cells in Drosophila sleep behavior through Neurogenetics. In order to decipher the role of glial cells in fruit fly behaviors such as locomotion and sleep, and to gain an insight into glia-neural interaction underlying regulatory mechanisms for these behaviors, we use a “cell-centric” forward genetic approach to identify the subset glia through studying sleep behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. We hypothesize that specific glial cells are crucial for various sleep characteristics by modulating the functionality of specific neurons. We genetically manipulate subset glia within a broad glial-specific repo-Gal4 expression pattern using the FINGR (Flippase-induced
Moses McDaniel
Research Associate
CV
Natural Sciences
Elizabeth City State University
Elizabeth City NC US
mamcdaniel@ecsu.edu

My research over the years has involved studies on the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismustase (SOD) and catalase in Drosophila melanogaster, plasmid DNA transformation of Crithidia sp., trypanosomatid protists that infect insects, the production of a novel insect cell line from a dipteran species, and current studies involving the isolation of antimicrobial peptides from insects
Thais Rodrigues
PhD
CV
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
thaisbarros.bio@gmail.com

RNAi technology applied to pest management
Jacob Vinay Vikas Konakondla
Fly Facility
National Centre for Biological Sciences, TIFR
Bangalore Karnataka India
kjvinayvikas@outlook.com
Fly Facility In-charge
Our facility provides services to the Drosophila researchers in the areas of transgenic generation by P-element, PhiC31 mediated, MiMIC methods. Our facility also carries of developmental work towards enabling modern genome editing technologies including CRISPR/Cas9 in Drosophila.
Richard Fandino
Dr.
Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology
Jena Thueringen Germany
rfandino@ice.mpg.de

My interest is mainly focused on the evolution of gene regulation and expression in chemosensory genes and the role these play in odor-guided behavior of insects. My post-doctoral studies are focused on establishing the ecological model, the sphinx moth, Manduca sexta as a feasible molecular model for receptor / odorant interactions.
Camilo Ayra-Pardo
Postdoctoral researcher
Plant Division
CIGB
Havana Havana Cuba
cayrapardo73@gmail.com

My research experience covers the development of applied biotechnological solutions for the control of insect crop pests, as well as, the investigation of molecular aspects of host-pathogen interaction including the molecular mechanisms behind resistance evolution to microbial pesticides.
Tofazzal Hossain Howlader
Associate Professor
Department of Entomology
Bangladesh Agricultural University
Mymensingh Mymensingh Bangladesh
tofazzalh@gmail.com

Bacillus thuringiensis, Entomopathogenic fungi
Juan Hurtado
Ecology, Genetics and Evolution
IEGEBA - University of Buenos Aires
C.A. Buenos Aires C.A. Buenos Aires Argentina
hurtado.juanp@gmail.com

Reproductive Biology and Evolution
Azza Elgendy
CV
Entomology Department
Faculty of Science, Cairo University
Giza Non-US/Non-Canadian Egypt
aelgendy@sci.cu.edu.eg

Medical entomology
Michelle Anderson
Lab Manager
CV
Fralin Life Science Institute and Department of Entomology
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Blacksburg VA USA
manderson@vt.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in our laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Mohammad Haddadi
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
University of Zabol
Zabol Sistan and Baluchestan Iran
hadadimohamad@gmail.com
Molecular Neurobiology
Aging and neuronal dysfunction.
Philipp Brand
MSc
CV
Department of Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA USA
pbrand@ucdavis.edu
Ramirez Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested in the evolution of insect chemosensory systems and its impact on speciation processes. I am currently working with Santiago Ramirez at the Center for Population Biology at UC Davis as a PhD candidate in the PopBio Graduate Group (Cohort of 2013/2014). My research focuses on the evolution of chemical communication systems in the charismatic group of orchid bees. By integrating molecular genomic, chemical and functional neurophysiological analyses in a population biological framework, I am studying how pheromone communication systems evolve.
Sherry Adrianos
Research Molecular Biologist
Stored Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit (SPIERU)
USDA ARS
Manhattan KS USA
7SherryA@gmail.com
Oppert Lab
We are utilizing CRISPR/Cas technology with a goal to control coleopteran storage pests. Tribolium castaneum genes critical for survival are being targeted. These methodologies will be transferred to other stored product pests.
Lynette Strickland
Animal Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Champaign IL United States
slynn731@gmail.com

Broadly I am interested in molecular evolution and evolutionary genomics. For my dissertation work, I am focusing on the genetic and developmental basis of color variation in a Neotropical beetle species. I am using RAD-sequencing to construct the first linkage map, which will hopefully lead to the first annotated genome for Chelymorpha alternans. I am also using RAD to look at population structure between different morphotypes in different geographic locations. In addition to this, I will be using RNA-sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization to examine and visualize differences in development of color patterns between different morphotypes.
Prasad Paradkar
Senior Research Scientist
Health and Biosecurity
CSIRO
Geelong Victoria Australia
prasadnp@gmail.com
Vector-Borne Diseases
Interest in mosquito innate immunity against arboviruses. Our lab is working at identification of vector competence factors and whether we can manipulate these factors to prevent transmission.
Ewan Richardson
Mr
Biochemistry and Crop Protection
Rothamsted
Brighton Sussex United Kingdom
ewan.richardson@rothamsted.ac.uk

I study the mutations underlying resistance to Diamide insecticides amongst moths. Much of my work revolves around structural study of the Ryanodine Receptor, a calcium channel of major importance in all animals. I use transgenesis to explore the impact of Ryanodine Receptor mutations on pesticide resistance in moths, and to determine whether the same effects can be established in other insect orders.
Erica Lindroth
Testing and Evaluation
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence
Jacksonville Florida USA
erica.j.lindroth.mil@mail.mil

My research focuses on the development and evaluation of vector control technology for military use.
Duverney Chaverra Rodriguez
PhD Candidate
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
State College Pennsylvania United States
ddc172@psu.edu
Jason Rasgon Lab
My research focuses in exploring and optimizing strategies to produce transgenic insects via maternal injection.
Joaquin de Navascues
Research Fellow
European Cancer Stem Cell Research Institute
Cardiff University
Cardiff Cardiff United Kingdom
denavascuesj@cardiff.ac.uk

I am interested in how cells take decisions based on inter cellular signalling, in particular about differentiation. I study this in the context of the adult intestinal stem cells of the fruit fly.
Rick DeRose
External Collaborations and Technology Acquistion
Syngenta
RTP NC USA
rick.derose@syngenta.com

Mechanisms and methods for controlling insects.
Tetsuro Shinoda
Division of Insect Sciences
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
shinoda@affrc.go.jp

Molecular mechanisms of juvenile hormone action
Yuemei Dong
Dr.
Dept of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA
ydong3@jhu.edu

Vector biology, malaria control, mosquito innate immunity, vector-borne infectious diseases
Tabashir Chowdhury
PhD candidate
CV
Biology
University of Western Ontario
London Ontario Canada
tabashir@gmail.com

Genetic basis of behavioural isolation and speciation in Drosophila
T.G. Emyr Davies
Dr
Biological Chemistry & Crop Protection
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire UK
emyr.davies@rothamsted.ac.uk
Senior Research Scientist
Recent research has been focused on understanding the molecular basis of target site (voltage-gated sodium channel, ryanodine receptor) resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, DDT and diamide insecticides in agricultural pests and vectors of human disease. Currently working towards establishing a transformation platform at Rothamsted using CRISPRs/TALENs and transgenic D. melanogaster to study metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms.
Jean-Philippe DAVID
Dr
LECA Grenoble
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (french CNRS)
Grenoble Isère France
jean-philippe.david@ujf-grenoble.fr
Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine
Adapation in mosquitoes including insecticide resistance mechanisms.
Takaaki Daimon
PhD
Insect Growth Regulation Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Japan
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
daimontakaaki@affrc.go.jp

Insect genetics and endocrinology
Andrea Smidler
PhD candidate
Immunology and Infectious Diseases/ Dept. of Genetics
Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health/ Harvard Medical School
Boston Ma USA
asmidler@fas.harvard.edu

My thesis project focuses on mosquito genome engineering for the purposes of vector control.
Hector Quemada
Director, Biosafety Resource Network
Institute for International Crop Improvement
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
St. Louis MO USA
hquemada@danforthcenter.org

My area of work is the regulation of genetically engineered organisms, including transgenic insects and transgenic crops.
RANIA ABD EL-WAHAB
Assistant Professor
CV
Mites of Cotton and Field Crops
PLANT PROTECTION RESEARCH INSTITUTE
MANSOURA MANSOURA EGYPT
rania-proline@hotmail.com

NANOTECHNOLOGY,LIGHT EMITTING DIODES EFFECTS,PREDATION ON MITES
Atef Sayed
CV
Biological control
Plant Protection Research
Ismailia Ismailia Egypt
atef.mahmoud1@gmail.com

Willing to collaborate on : - Genetic and molecular researches and biotechnological and nanotechnology approaches for the management of insect pests. - Improve pest control strategies and programs for major economic pests and crops through new applied research results. - Maximization of biological control and other relevant substitutes within the framework of IPM and environmentally safe methods.
Anna-Louise Doss
Graduate Student Researcher
Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Graduate Program
University of California, Riverside
Riverside California United States
adoss001@ucr.edu
Peter Atkinson Lab
My dissertation research centers on elucidating DNA transposon structure and function and, reciprocally, on exploiting transposons as robust genetic tools in the field of mosquito-borne disease control.
Ethan Degner
Student
Entomology Department
Cornell University
Ithaca NY United States
ecd77@cornell.edu
Harrington Lab
I am broadly interested in the ecology of insect vectors of human disease. Specfically, I am interested in the reproductive biology of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.
sarah boyd
AWP
AWP
beacon NY United States
sarah.hoover.boyd@gmail.com
AWP
This is a sample entry.
Zain UlAbdin
Dr./Assistant Professor
Entomology
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
zainunibas@gmail.com
"Insect Molecular Biology Lab."
Insect parasitoids have evolved an amazing array of mechanisms to manipulate host physiology and biochemistry and they are able to suppress the immune response of the host and to disrupt its development and reproduction. The virulence and host regulation factors triggering these alterations are injected by the ovipositing females in their hosts. The astonishing richness of species in the parasitic Hymenoptera pro¬vides a unique reservoir of molecular biodiversity for new bio¬insecticide molecules, targeting a number of insect species and developmental stages. Host-parasitoid associations in insects offer an impressive opportunity to identify new genes and molecules responsible for the major
Flor Acevedo
Graduate student
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA United States
floredith.acevedo@gmail.com

Functional genomics, insect transformation, plant defense response to biotic stresses, chemical ecology,
Dave Denlinger
CV
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
david.denlinger@aggiemail.usu.edu
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Raman Chandrasekar
Research Associate
Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics
Kansas State University
manhattan Kansas United States
biochandrus@yahoo.com
Research Associate
1. RNA Sequence analysis, Genomic and Proteomics appraoches 2. Study of insect proteins and enzymes will not only give valuable information on their unique biochemistry and physiology but will also identify novel tools for the development of new technologies and new ways to produce novel insect control measures. My main focus is will address the physiological and biochemical functions of proteins and enzymes in the insects’ life processes by using proteomics tools (i.e 2D PAGE, MS, MALDI-TOF, PMF), characterization of novel enzymes, qualitative and quantitative characterization of proteins and their interactions on a genome scale,
Adenike Adeyemo
Dr Mrs
Department of Biology, School of Sciences
Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
Akure,  Ondo State Nigeria
yemonike@yahoo.com
Food Storage Laboratory, Department of Biology
Stored products Entomology, Insect biochemistry with emphasis on mode of action of bio -pesticides in insects
Geoffrey Attardo
Assistant Professor
CV
Entomology and Nematology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA United States
gmattardo@ucdavis.edu

My research focuses upon the reproductive biology of insect vectors of human disease. My Ph.D. thesis in Dr. Alex Raikhels lab focused upon the effects of nutritional components of blood (amino acids) upon the transcriptional regulation of yolk protein genes in the Yellow Fever mosquito (Aedes aegypti). Following that I worked for 13 years, first as a Postdoc and then a Research Scientist, at Yale University with Dr. Serap Aksoy on the reproductive biology of tsetse flies. I have recently started a lab group in the Entomology and Nematology Department at the University of California, Davis. My work here is
Mubarak Hussain Syed
Dr
University of Oregon
HHMI/Institute for neurobiology
Eugene Oregon United States
mosvey@gmail.com
Doe lab
Drosophila neural Stem cell temporal identity
Shengzhang Dong
Ph.D
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public health
Baltimore MD USA
dongshzhang@gmail.com

Aedes mosquito-arbovirus interactions; Anopheles mosquito-Plasmodium parasite interactions; insect miRNAs; insect immunity; insect physiology and molecular biology.
Trevor Wardill
BBSRC David Phillips Fellow
Physiology, Development and Neuroscience Department
University of Cambridge
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
tjw79@cam.ac.uk

I study how visual information in various species of flies is integrated in the brain, looking particularly how colour and motion signals are combined and used in behaviours such as finding mates and food. This research aims to discover some of the principles of how neurons decide which information is important and which to discard, and which has the greatest priority. In the coming year I will hire a postdoc to help my plans to make genetic tools that will make non-model species more accessible to transgenic alteration.
Claire Donald
Miss
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
University of Glasgow
Glasgow GLASGOW Scotland, UK
1103886d@student.gla.ac.uk
Kohl Lab
The Kohl group works on RNA interference, immune signalling pathways and virus/host interactions in arthropod vectors by using arboviruses or virus-derived replicons from all major families. The aim of my work is to further understand the interaction of arboviruses with the RNAi responses of their mosquito vector.
durga prasad
Dr
Entomology - cotton
Regional Agricultural Research Station,Lam,Guntur,Andhra Pradesh -522034,India
Guntur Andhra Pradesh India
nemanidp@yahoo.com
Cotton entomology lab
Insect Toxicology
Gary Blissard
Professor
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
gwb1@cornell.edu
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
Brittany Dodson
Entomology
Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA USA
bld25@psu.edu

Recently there has been a lot of excitement surrounding the study of microorganisms that live inside us and how they influence our health. Insects also have relationships with their own microorganisms, but most research surrounding them has merely been descriptive. Medically important insects (like mosquitoes) vary in their ability to transmit pathogens, possibly due to differences between internal environments of those insects. Studies have found that mosquito bacteria abundance and diversity may impact malaria parasites. However, the identity, function and utility of those microbes are virtually unknown, especially in mosquitoes that transmit viruses. I am investigating how bacteria within the mosquito
philip Ndaloma
Lecturer
CV
Plant and Soil Sciences
Cuttington University
Monrovia Gbarnga  Liberia
firstnamephilipndaloma@yahoo.com

Climate change impact on the re-occurrence of army worm
Hassan M. Ahmed
Developmental Biology
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
hmutasi@biologie.uni-goettingen.de
Wimmer Lab
My research focus in the use of developmental and molecular biology techniques to develop eco-friendly transgenic insect control strategies that can be used to fight insect of economical and public health importance (agricultural pest, diseases vectors).
Fidel de la Cruz Hernandez-Hernandez
PhD
Infectomica y Patogenesis Molecular
CINVESTAV-IPN
Mexico DF Mexico
cruzcruz@cinvestav.mx
Molecular Entomology
Physiology of midgut, fat body and salivary glans during feeding.
Helena Richardson
Group Leader
CV
Research
Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre
Melbourne V ictoria Australia
Drh_richardson@yahoo.com.au
Cell cycle and development lab
My research ulilizes the vinegar fly, Drosophila, to model tumourigenesis, with the vision of understanding how regulators of cell polarity and the actin cytoskeleton impact on cell signalling and cell proliferation, a field in which she is internationally recognised. She collaborates with mammalian researchers to translate her findings to mouse and human cancer models.
Jozef Vanden Broeck
Prof. Dr.
Animal Physiology and Neurobiology (Dept. of Biology)
University of Leuven
Leuven Flanders Belgium
Jozef.VandenBroeck@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
This research group is investigating the physiological role and mode of action of neural and endocrine messenger molecules in postembryonic developmental processes. These processes are studied in an evolutionary context by comparative approaches. In particular, we are studying receptors and their signal transduction pathways in insect cells. Our aim is to unravel the cellular and organismal physiological mechanisms that regulate important post-embryonic developmental processes, such as growth and reproduction. The group is also interested in the influence of environmental factors that can lead to the extreme phenotypic plasticity of locust species. In addition, application-oriented research is carried out to explore novel
Musa Mohammedani
federal ministry of health
environmental health/ entomologist
university of khartoum
Khartoum Khartoum Sudan
mmmusamhd09@gmail.com

Genetic and molecular biology
Adriana Costero-Saint Denis
Vector Biology Program Officer
Div. of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH
Rockville Maryland USA
acostero@niaid.nih.gov

Vector biology
Owain Edwards
Group Leader, Environmental Genomics
Land & Water
CSIRO
Floreat WA Australia
Owain.Edwards@csiro.au
CSIRO Environmental Genomics
Dr Owain Edwards’ research focuses on aphid-host plant interactions at the level of the organism (both aphid and plant) and the molecule, including work with colleagues in the International Aphid Genomics Consortium (IAGC) to characterise the components of aphid saliva. Dr Edwards’ work as part of the IAGC also includes a focus on epigenetic regulation of aphid polyphenism, in particular the roles of DNA methylation and non-coding RNAs in modulating aphid development. With collaborators at the University of Melbourne, Dr Edwards is investigating novel strategies to control invertebrate pests through better management of insecticide resistance, and by using
Rodney Richardson
Department of Entomology
The Ohio State University
Columbus  Ohio USA
richardson.827@osu.edu

My research efforts focus on issues pertaining to toxicology and immunology in the European honey bee. Specifically, I am interested in the discovery and mechanistic explanation of how environmentally encountered xenobiotics affect insect immune function.
George Roderick
Professor and Chair
Environmental Science
UC Berkeley
Berkeley CA USA
roderick@berkeley.edu

Invasive species, population biology, biodiversity, sustainability, biological control, global homogenization
TRANG LE THI DIEU
Dr.
Research Institute for Biotechnology and Environment
Nong Lam University in HCMC
Thu Duc District Ho Chi Minh City Vietnam
ltdtrang@hcmuaf.edu.vn
Insect Science
Insect Circadian Biology, Insect Physiology, Pesticide resistance in insect, Insect control
Seth Donoughe
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
seth.donoughe@gmail.com

Insect development and evolution
Dr. ATUL KUMAR PANDEY
Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior
Alexander Silberman Institute of life sciences
Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India
Jerusalem Jerusalem Israel
atulkumarpandey@gmail.com
Sociobiology Lab
Sociobiological, physiological and behavioural studies of sleep and its deprivational consequences
Mostafa Ghafouri Moghaddam
Ph.D candidate
Plant Protection
University of Zabol
Zahedan Iran Iran
m.ghafourim@yahoo.com

Systematic Braconidae and Ichneumonidae
Maurijn van der Zee
Dr.
Institute of Biology
Leiden University
Leiden ZH Netherlands
m.van.der.zee@biology.leidenuniv.nl
Van der Zee lab
-comparative genomics and evolution of the TGFbeta ligands -transgenesis, live imaging and blastoderm formation -the function of the serosa in innate immunity
Leigh Boardman
Dr
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Fl USA
lboardman@ufl.edu

Integrative and comparative biology, genotype-phenotype interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying organismal tolerance to environmental stressors
Craig Wilding
Lecturer in Evolutionary Genetics
CV
School of Natural Sciences and Psychology
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool Merseyside UK
c.s.wilding@ljmu.ac.uk

My current research uses molecular and evolutionary genetic techniques and principles to address problems in tropical medicine, principally the molecular genetics of insect disease vectors primarily in Anopheles mosquitoes but more recently on the Culex vectors of lymphatic filariasis. The main focus of my research is the genetic basis of insecticide resistance in mosquitoes. Resistance to the insecticides used in vector control represents a possible impediment to effective control strategies and an understanding of the genetic basis of this resistance would aid not only in the development of improved insecticide formulations, and hence more effective control measures, but also allow the
Mustafa Wajidi
Associate Professor
CV
School of Distance Education
Universiti Sains Malaysia
Minden Pulau Pinang Malaysia
mfadzil@usm.my
Molecular Entomology Research Group
Current research focuses on insect molecular biology, in particular, trying to elucidate the role of cytochromes P450 in metabolism of xenobiotics
Mauro Mandrioli
PhD
Life Sciences
University of Modena and Reggio Emilia
Modena Italy Italy
mauro.mandrioli@unimo.it
Insect genetics and Biosciences Lab
Insect cytogenetics and microbiome analysis
Rob Good
Genetics
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
rtgood@unimelb.edu.au
Robin
Genomics of Drosophila, Aphids,Molluscs RNAi studies of Aphids and molluscs Developing software tools.
Takahiro Kikawada
Principal Researcher/ Associate Professor
Insect Mimetics Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences (Japan)/ The University of Tokyo
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
kikawada@affrc.go.jp
Anhydrobiosis Research Group- Kikawada Lab
We study the molecular mechanisms underlying an extreme desiccation tolerance, anhydrobiosis in the African midge, Polypedilum vanderplanki, which can revive even if they are completely dehydrated. In the process of this study, we identified several key genes involved in anhydrobiosis, such as LEA proteins and trehalose transporters. Now we have started integrative omics projects of the midge to understand comprehensively the mechanisms.
Darren Obbard
Dr
Institute of Evolutionary Biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Midlothian UK
darren.obbard@ed.ac.uk

Evolutionary Genetics Genome Evolution Drosophila Insect viruses Antiviral RNAi
Wannes Dermauw
Dr.
Crop Protection
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
wannes.dermauw@ugent.be
Acarology
The Acarology lab has a long tradition in studying fundamental and applied aspects of arthropod crop pests. One of the main achievements of our group was the establishment of a new resistance paradigm in arthropods, by documenting the role of heteroplasmy in insecticide resistance (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008). We have also documented the evolutionary adaptation to several xenobiotics, hereby often uncovering the mode of action of agrochemicals in spider mites (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008, 2012, Dermauw et al. 2012). In recent years, our group was one of the key players in a collaborative project to sequence and
Nicolas Durand
Ph.D.
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables Florida USA
nfdurand@gmail.com
Alex Wilson's lab
Insect physiology and ecology Sap feeding insects Symbiosis
Renata Da Rosa
PhD
CV
Department of General Biology
State University of Londrina - Brazil
Londrina Paraná Brazil
renata-darosa@uel.br
Laboratory of Animal Cytogenetics
Molecular entomology; Functional Genomics in insects; Molecular cytogenetics and cytogenomics.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
mscheel@nd.edu
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Carolyn McBride
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ USA
lmcbride@rockefeller.edu

The molecular, neural, and evolutionary basis of insect behavior
Emilie Pondeville
Dr
Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation
University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
Glasgow Glasgow Scotland, UK
emilie.pondeville@glasgow.ac.uk

Reproduction and immunity in mosquito vectors using genetic tools
Anna Whitfield
Associate Professor
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Kansas United States
aewtospo@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research is devoted to investigating plant-virus-vector interactions at the molecular level with the goal of developing a better understanding of the complex sequence of events leading to virus acquisition and transmission by vectors. The virus life cycle is inextricably linked to fundamental host processes and this intimate association poses a challenge for plant virologists searching for ways to develop novel control strategies that specifically attack the infection cycle of viruses without compromising the health of host plants. Using a systems approach, we hope to identify the commonalities and unique features of the virus infection cycle in arthropod and plant
Vett Lloyd
Professor
Biology
Mt. Allison University
Sackville New Brunswick Canada
vlloyd@mta.ca
Lloyd Lab - Mt. Allison
Drosophila: Epigenetics, transgenerational effects, Wolbachia Ticks: Genome structure, population structure, Borrelia, bartonella
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
Julie Reynolds
Postdoctoral Researcher
Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology
Ohio State University
Columbus OH USA
reynolds.473@osu.edu
Postdoctoral Researcher
Molecular, Biochemical, and Physiological aspects of diapause.
Adam Dolezal
Postdoctoral Researcher
Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University
Ames IA USA
adolezal@gmail.com

I am interested in the interaction of various stressors, particularly nutrition and pathogens, on honey bee health, as well as how these factors affect other pollinator species.
Marian Goldsmith
Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Rhode Island
Kingston RI USA
mki101@uri.edu
Professor
Molecular linkage mapping, cytogenetics, and genomics of the domesticated silkworm, Bombyx mori and applications to other lepidopteran species.
Marten Edwards
Assoc. Professor
Biology
Muhlenberg College
Allentown PA USA
edwards@muhlenberg.edu
Edwards
I am interested in corpora allata expression in Aedes aegypti. I have prepared 8 constructs that contain 1-3 kb upstream regions of JH biosynthetic enzyme genes fused to EGFP and would like to test them in transgenic Ae. aegypti. If anyone is interested in collaborating with me to test these constructs, please contact me.
Urs Schmidt-Ott
Associate Professor
Organismal Biology and Anatomy
University of Chicago
Chicago Illinois USA
uschmid@uchicago.edu

Molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. I have a long-standing interest in comparative developmental genetics of animals, especially the molecular evolution of developmental mechanisms. Research in my laboratory examines the reorganization of embryonic development during the radiation of the insect order Diptera (flies, mosquitoes, midges etc.) and involves developmental, genetic, genomic and biochemical approaches in a variety of dipteran models that we and others have been developing for many years (e.g. Megaselia, Clogmia, Episyrphus, Chironomus, Coboldia).
Nicole Gerardo
Assistant Professor
Biology
Emory University
Atlanta GA - Georgia United States
nicole.gerardo@emory.edu
The Gerardo Lab
Our lab's focus is on the evolutionary ecology of interactions between microbes and hosts. We are interested in how both beneficial and harmful microbes establish and maintain relationships with their hosts. Such associations are shaped by ecological limitations on host range, evolutionary trade-offs for both hosts and microbes, and host immunology. We combine genomics, phylogenetics and experimental approaches to study these forces in diverse insect-microbe systems.
Claude Desplan
Professor
CV
Biology
NYU
New York New York United States
cd38@nyu.edu
Molecular Genetics
EVO-DEVO: Evolution of axis formation using the wasp Nasonia. Different strategies are used in insects to establish embryonic polarity. In the ancestral short-germ mode of development, nuclei fated to become the embryo are restricted to the posterior end of the egg while the anterior of the egg develops as extra-embryonic membranes. Only anterior segments are patterned at the syncytial blastoderm while abdominal segments form in a posterior growth zone. This system relies on a single posterior morphogenetic center whereby a localized posterior determinant (nanos) is responsible for forming gradients of factors that pattern head and thorax. In the derived long-germ
Gloria I. Giraldo-Calderón
VectorBase Scientific Liaison/Outreach Manager
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame IN USA
ggiraldo@nd.edu
VectorBase
I teach scientist at all career stages, students, postdocs, technicians, researchers, and faculty, how to use VectorBase data, tools and resources. I also teach how to manually annotate genes to submit them in VectorBase, we currently use Artemis but will soon host WebApollo too. Our developers are currently working on VectorBase Galaxy, soon will be teaching how to use it too.
Josephine Reinhardt
Postdoctoral Fellow
CV
Department of Biology
University of Maryland College Park
College Park MD USA
reinharj@umd.edu
http://igtrcn.org/participant/gerald-wilkinson/
I am currently studying several aspects of the genomics of stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), which are best known as a model for sexual selection and meiotic drive. Recently, it was also discovered the T. dalmanni have a sex chromosome distinct from both the ancestral X and the X in Drosophila, making them an interesting comparative model for aspects of sex-chromosome evolution. We recently released a transcriptome assembly as part of an analysis that identified genes that are differentially regulated in males carrying a driving sex chromosome. We are currently assembling and annotating the T. dalmanni genome.
Juergen Gadau
Professor
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe AZ United States of America
jgadau@asu.edu
Gadau Lab
Evolutionary genetics and genomics of solitary and social Hymenoptera
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA
adingwall@luc.edu

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Gregory Davis
Assistant Professor
CV
Biology
Bryn Mawr College
Bryn Mawr PA USA
gdavis@brynmawr.edu
G Davis Lab at Bryn Mawr College
At Bryn Mawr College my undergraduate students and I study environmentally cued, discrete, alternate phenotypes exhibited by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. The remarkable developmental plasticity of this insect presents an opportunity to examine divergent developmental processes that are somehow directed by a single genome and cued by the environment. Our focus is the reproductive polyphenism, in which differences in day length determine whether mothers will produce daughters that reproduce either sexually by laying fertilized eggs, or asexually by allowing oocytes to complete embryogenesis within the mother without fertilization. Oocytes and embryos that are produced asexually and develop within the
William Reid
Post Doctoral Associate
CV
Entomology
University of Maryland
IBBR
Rockville MD USA
wzr0005@tigermail.auburn.edu
O'Brochta lab
Working with forward genetic technologies in Anopheles stephensi
Alfred Handler
Research Geneticist
faculty
Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology
USDA, Agricultural Research Service
Gainesville FL United States
al.handler@ars.usda.gov
none
Our research is focused on understanding and manipulating the genes of tephritid fruit flies, a group of invasive pests of significant agricultural importance. We study transposable elements and their use as vectors for germ-line transformation, and development of new vector systems for genomic targeting and transgene stability.
Dr. Zach N. Adelman
Associate Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
zachadel@tamu.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in my laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Dr. Angela Douglas
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
aes326@cornell.edu
Douglas Lab
All animals are multi-organismal: they are chronically infected by beneficial microorganisms. We study the interaction between animal function and the diversity and activities of resident microorganisms.
Dr. Gro Amdam
Professor
faculty
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe AZ USA
gro.amdam@asu.edu
Amdam Lab
Our lab experimentally investigates honey bee social structure to understand how communal living evolved from ancestral solitary forms of life. As we have come to a better understanding of the physiology and genetics of bees, we have expanded our research interests: the honey bee (Apis mellifera) makes an ideal model organism for understanding the regulation of social life-history, aging and epigenetics.