Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics, and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant, you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements, and Activities.


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Participant Contact Research Focus
Shengzhang Dong
Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public health
Baltimore MD USA

Aedes mosquito-arbovirus interactions; Anopheles mosquito-Plasmodium parasite interactions; insect miRNAs; insect immunity; insect physiology and molecular biology.
Molly Duman Scheel
Associate Professor
Medical and Molecular Genetics
Indiana University School of Medicine
University of Notre Dame
South Bend IN USA
Duman Scheel Lab
Mosquito Developmental Genetics
Andrew Dingwall
Associate Professor
Oncology Research Inst., Dept. Pathology and Microbiology & Immunology
Loyola Univ Chicago, Stritch School of Medicine
Maywood IL USA

We currently are focused on two related and overlapping research projects: Chromatin remodeling factors and nuclear receptor coactivators in normal development and cancer. We utilize a variety of in vivo and biochemical approaches, involving organismal genetics and cell biology, molecular biology, biochemistry and genomics/bioinformatics. Our genetic model systems include the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and mouse hematopoietic stem cells, with projects extending into mouse cancer models and human tumor analyses. We have broad interests in chromatin-based epigenetic gene regulation, signaling pathways in normal and stem cell development and cancer metastases. Training and education of graduate and undergraduate students is a top
Dr. Angela Douglas
Department of Entomology
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
Douglas Lab
All animals are multi-organismal: they are chronically infected by beneficial microorganisms. We study the interaction between animal function and the diversity and activities of resident microorganisms.
Claude Desplan
New York New York United States
Molecular Genetics
EVO-DEVO: Evolution of axis formation using the wasp Nasonia. Different strategies are used in insects to establish embryonic polarity. In the ancestral short-germ mode of development, nuclei fated to become the embryo are restricted to the posterior end of the egg while the anterior of the egg develops as extra-embryonic membranes. Only anterior segments are patterned at the syncytial blastoderm while abdominal segments form in a posterior growth zone. This system relies on a single posterior morphogenetic center whereby a localized posterior determinant (nanos) is responsible for forming gradients of factors that pattern head and thorax. In the derived long-germ
Jean-Philippe DAVID
LECA Grenoble
Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (french CNRS)
Grenoble Isère France
Laboratoire d'Ecologie Alpine
Adapation in mosquitoes including insecticide resistance mechanisms.
T.G. Emyr Davies
Biological Chemistry & Crop Protection
Rothamsted Research
Harpenden Hertfordshire UK
Senior Research Scientist
Recent research has been focused on understanding the molecular basis of target site (voltage-gated sodium channel, ryanodine receptor) resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, DDT and diamide insecticides in agricultural pests and vectors of human disease. Currently working towards establishing a transformation platform at Rothamsted using CRISPRs/TALENs and transgenic D. melanogaster to study metabolic and target-site resistance mechanisms.
Nicolas Durand
Department of Biology
University of Miami
Coral Gables Florida USA
Alex Wilson's lab
Insect physiology and ecology Sap feeding insects Symbiosis
Renata Da Rosa
Department of General Biology
State University of Londrina - Brazil
Londrina Paraná Brazil
Laboratory of Animal Cytogenetics
Molecular entomology; Functional Genomics in insects; Molecular cytogenetics and cytogenomics.
Wannes Dermauw
Crop Protection
Ghent University
Ghent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgium
The Acarology lab has a long tradition in studying fundamental and applied aspects of arthropod crop pests. One of the main achievements of our group was the establishment of a new resistance paradigm in arthropods, by documenting the role of heteroplasmy in insecticide resistance (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008). We have also documented the evolutionary adaptation to several xenobiotics, hereby often uncovering the mode of action of agrochemicals in spider mites (Van Leeuwen et al. 2008, 2012, Dermauw et al. 2012). In recent years, our group was one of the key players in a collaborative project to sequence and
Brittany Dodson
Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA USA

Recently there has been a lot of excitement surrounding the study of microorganisms that live inside us and how they influence our health. Insects also have relationships with their own microorganisms, but most research surrounding them has merely been descriptive. Medically important insects (like mosquitoes) vary in their ability to transmit pathogens, possibly due to differences between internal environments of those insects. Studies have found that mosquito bacteria abundance and diversity may impact malaria parasites. However, the identity, function and utility of those microbes are virtually unknown, especially in mosquitoes that transmit viruses. I am investigating how bacteria within the mosquito
Seth Donoughe
Organismic and Evolutionary Biology
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA

Insect development and evolution
Adam Dolezal
Postdoctoral Researcher
Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
Iowa State University

I am interested in the interaction of various stressors, particularly nutrition and pathogens, on honey bee health, as well as how these factors affect other pollinator species.
Gregory Davis
Assistant Professor
Bryn Mawr College
Bryn Mawr PA USA
G Davis Lab at Bryn Mawr College
At Bryn Mawr College my undergraduate students and I study environmentally cued, discrete, alternate phenotypes exhibited by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. The remarkable developmental plasticity of this insect presents an opportunity to examine divergent developmental processes that are somehow directed by a single genome and cued by the environment. Our focus is the reproductive polyphenism, in which differences in day length determine whether mothers will produce daughters that reproduce either sexually by laying fertilized eggs, or asexually by allowing oocytes to complete embryogenesis within the mother without fertilization. Oocytes and embryos that are produced asexually and develop within the
Dave Denlinger
Department of Biology
Utah State University
Logan Utah USA
Bernhardt Lab
I study insecticide resistance in sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae)
Ethan Degner
Entomology Department
Cornell University
Ithaca NY United States
Harrington Lab
I am broadly interested in the ecology of insect vectors of human disease. Specfically, I am interested in the reproductive biology of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti.
Claire Donald
MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research
University of Glasgow
Glasgow GLASGOW Scotland, UK
Kohl Lab
The Kohl group works on RNA interference, immune signalling pathways and virus/host interactions in arthropod vectors by using arboviruses or virus-derived replicons from all major families. The aim of my work is to further understand the interaction of arboviruses with the RNAi responses of their mosquito vector.
Anna-Louise Doss
Graduate Student Researcher
Cell, Molecular and Developmental Biology Graduate Program
University of California, Riverside
Riverside California United States
Peter Atkinson Lab
My dissertation research centers on elucidating DNA transposon structure and function and, reciprocally, on exploiting transposons as robust genetic tools in the field of mosquito-borne disease control.
Takaaki Daimon
Insect Growth Regulation Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Japan
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan

Insect genetics and endocrinology
Yuemei Dong
Dept of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology
Johns Hopkins School of Public Health
Baltimore MD USA

Vector biology, malaria control, mosquito innate immunity, vector-borne infectious diseases