Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements and Activities.


A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Participant Contact Research Focus
Isabella Schember
Biochemistry
University at Buffalo-SUNY
Buffalo NY USA
ilschemb@buffalo.edu
Halfon Lab, PhD candidate
I am currently a PhD candidate and I am interested in studying gene regulatory network evolution and regulatory genomics of various insects.
Dr Jagdish Jaba
CV
Entomology
International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics(ICRISAT), Hyderabad, Telangana, Inida
HYDERABAD Telangana India
jaba.jagdish@gmail.com
Integrated Crop Management
Host Plant Resistance, Insect biochemistry, Biocontrol and IPM
Kaylen Brzezinski
Department of Biology
Carleton University
Ottawa Ontario Canada
kaylenbrzezinski@cmail.carleton.ca
MacMillan Lab
My research focuses on how temperature (mainly cold stress) affects paracellular barrier permeability in gut epithelia.
Kara Boltz
Postdoctoral Research Scholar
Entomology & Plant Pathology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC USA
kaboltz@ncsu.edu

Design and evaluation of gene drives in fly pests.
Lucille Kohlenberg
BME
UW Madison
Madison WI USA
lkohlenberg@wisc.edu

Genome Engineering
Richard Baxter
Assistant Professor
Chemistry
Yale University
New Haven CT USA
richard.baxter@yale.edu
Baxterlab
Current research within my laboratory includes the innate immune system of insect disease vectors, inhibitors of insect transglutaminases, and structural approaches for the design of novel peptide scaffolds and catalysts.
Timothy Ajiboye
Mr
Field Genebank
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology(NACGRAB), Moor Plantation, Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria
Ibadan Oyo state Nigeria
ajiboyefemi2002@yahoo.com
National Centre for Genetic Resources and Biotechnology
Molecular Characterization of Cereal stem borers. Control of cereal stemborers using host plant resistance. Conservation of Insects, Tree crops, and other Field genetic Resources.
Olena Riabinina
MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
Imperial College London
London London UK
oriabinina@gmail.com

I am interested in sensory neuroscience and genetics. I have introduced the Q-system into A. gambiae to study olfactory processing in these mosquitoes. I also play around with flies.
Wiem BEN AMARA
Biology
Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University of Tunis El Manar
Tunis El Manar Tunisia
wiem.benamara7@gmail.com
Unité de recherche de génomique des insectes ravageurs des cultures
study of transposable elements in insects
Karen Kemirembe
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park Pennsylvania United States
kuk195@psu.edu
Rasgon Lab
Investigating how Wolbachia pipientis affects mosquito susceptibility to mosquito viruses.
Sanjay Basu
CV
Arthropod Genetics
The Pirbright Institute
Woking Surrey UK
sanjay.basu@pirbright.ac.uk

Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, transgenesis, gene-editing, gene drive, refractory transgenes, site-specific integration, RMCE, transposons, HDR/NHEJ, virology, underdominance, molecular biology
Jovana Bozic
PhD
School of Biosciences and Veterinary Medicine
University of Camerino
Camerino Macerata Italy
jovana.bozic@unicam.it
Parasitology and Sanitary Entomology
Yeast symbionts of malaria vectors: manipulation of symbionts that can express anti-pathogen molecules within the host (paratransgenesis).
Anna Buchman
Project Scientist
Department of Entomology
UC Riverside
Riverside CA USA
annabuch@ucr.edu
Akbari Lab
I am currently working to develop replacement and suppression gene drive systems in fruit flies and mosquitoes.
Nahid Borhani Dizaji
Post doc fellow
molecular microbiology and immunology
Johns Hopkins University , School of public health
Baltimore MD United States
nborhan1@jhu.edu

my focus interest is on different aspects of vector biology like mosquito-pathogen interactions and dissection of mosquito immunity to Plasmodium and dengue virus infection with emphasis on developing novel strategies against mosquito born disease vectors. As a current post doc fellow I am working on generating of transgenic mosquitoes.
Heath Blackmon
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
coleoguy@gmail.com

I am interested in chromosome evolution, specifically, sex chromosome and chromosome number evolution. To address these topics, I use a broad range of approaches including theoretical population genetics, applied phylogenetics, and bioinformatics.
Elizabeth Brandt
Entomology
University of Maryland
Potomac MD USA
brandte13@gmail.com

Metabolic detox pathways of insects
Mateus Berni
Institute of Biomedical Sciences
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro RJ Brazil
mateusberni@yahoo.com.br
Laboratório de Biologia Molecular do Desenvolvimento
Developmental Biology in Rhodnius prolixus
pradeep bhongale
AGROCHEMICALS AND PEST MANAGMENT
SHIVAJI UNIVERSITY. KOLHAPUR
KOLHAPUR MAHARASTRA INDIA
pradeepbhongale1993@gmail.com

DNA BARCODING FOR PEST IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT
Janneke Bloem
Laboratory of Entomology
Wageningen University The Netherlands
Wageningen x Netherlands
janneke.bloem@wur.nl

Entomology
John Beckmann
Dr.
CV
Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry
Yale University
New Haven Connecticut USA
john.beckmann@yale.edu

I study the molecular mechanism of Wolbachia induced cytoplasmic incompatibility in insects. With respect to this I seek to develop transgenes that will be effective genetic units for induction of sterility and application of the sterile insect technique.
Ma.Anita Bautista
Dr.
CV
Functional Genomics Laboratory
National Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology
Quezon City National Capital Region Philippines
mambautista69@gmail.com
Functional Genomics
I currently handle research projects involving transcriptome and genome analyses of termites and selected insect pests of coconut and rice, an insect parasitoid, stingless bees, plant pathogens, and Philippine coconut varieties.
Thais Rodrigues
PhD
CV
Entomology
University of Kentucky
Lexington KY United States
thaisbarros.bio@gmail.com

RNAi technology applied to pest management
Rebeca Carballar
CV
Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
University of California Irvine
Irvine CA United States
rebecacarballar@gmail.com

My long-term research theme will be focused on the biology of mosquito metabolism and how does the epigenetic basal stage can have an impact in mosquito metabolites during pathogen infections. Mosquito metabolomics: Metabolomics is a newly emerging field of “omics” research focused in the comprehensive characterization of small molecules (metabolites). Metabolomics is an important tool that can complement the existing data (transcriptomics, genomics and proteomics) in mosquito research. I pioneer the use of mass spectrometry analytical methods to profile a metabolite signature in vector mosquitoes and I have established a pipeline for metabolomics analyses, including sample collection, metabolite extractions, and data
Philipp Brand
MSc
CV
Department of Evolution and Ecology
University of California, Davis
Davis CA USA
pbrand@ucdavis.edu
Ramirez Lab
I am an evolutionary biologist interested in the evolution of insect chemosensory systems and its impact on speciation processes. I am currently working with Santiago Ramirez at the Center for Population Biology at UC Davis as a PhD candidate in the PopBio Graduate Group (Cohort of 2013/2014). My research focuses on the evolution of chemical communication systems in the charismatic group of orchid bees. By integrating molecular genomic, chemical and functional neurophysiological analyses in a population biological framework, I am studying how pheromone communication systems evolve.
Ulrich Beckers
Dr.
Department of biology and Department of chemistry
Bielefeld University
Gütersloh NRW F. R. Germany
ulrich.beckers@web.de

I am an neuroscientist interested in coding and signal transmission. I work on cellualar level mostly using electrophysiological methods. I want to evaluate genetic methods for my research projects. Primarily I want to learn more about CRIPR/CAS9. I may also look for potential collaborations (am planning to apply for a grant).
Vanessa Corby-Harris
Research Physiologist
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center
USDA-ARS
Tucson AZ USA
vanessa.corby@ars.usda.gov
Corby-Harris Lab
Our goal is to increase honey bee health through improved nutrition.
Nagraj Sambrani
Postdoc
CV
Lab of Molecular genetics
CDFD, Hyderabad, India
Hyderabad Telengana india
loginnagraj@gmail.com
LMG
My Current Project A major challenge in developmental biology is the elucidation of how changes in patterning mechanisms have contributed to the evolution of morphology. The insect wing is a fascinating developmental system in which to study this question, because of presence of vast diversification in insect wing morphologies. The proposed research will compare
Rebijith K B
PDN Cambridge
University of Cambridge
Cambridge  Cambridgeshire  United Kingdom
rebijith@gmail.com

My aim is to continue my work on the cutting-edge researchable areas of Molecular Entomology such as RNAi in insect pest management, Small RNAs: their diversity, roles and practical uses, Potential application of CRISPR/Cas9 to control insect pests etc. Moreover, I will strive to work into the real problems of farmers and develop procedures and novel techniques for solving their problems and improving the efficacy of production
Jennifer Baltzegar
NSF IGERT Fellow in Genetic Engineering and Society
CV
Department of Biological Sciences
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
jen_baltzegar@ncsu.edu
Gould Lab
I am broadly interested in studying the differences between populations and species via mechanisms of evolution and impacts of population change. I am particularly interested in studying the impacts genetic engineering technologies have on natural populations.
Anna Katrina Briley
LRRI Contractor for U.S. Navy
Navy Entomology Center of Excellence/ University of Florida
Jacksonville Florida US
annakatrinabriley@gmail.com

Testing and Evaluation of novel pesticide products and equipment for military use.
Bart Pannebakker
Assistant Professor
Laboratory of Genetics
Wageningen University
Wageningen Gelderland The Netherlands
bart.pannebakker@wur.nl

I am interested in the evolution and genomics of life-history traits and reproductive strategies in insects. My research focuses on the genetic and physiological mechanisms that underlie these traits in parasitoid wasps (insects that lay their eggs on other insects), and in honeybees. I am also Coordinator of BINGO-ITN: Breeding Invertebrates for Next Generation BioControl. BINGO is a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Innovative Training Network that develops innovative research training to improve the production and performance of natural enemies in biological control by the use of genetic variation for rearing, monitoring and performance.
Alexandros Belavilas-Trovas
Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology
University of Thessaly
Larissa Thessaly Greece
alexbelavilas@hotmail.com
Molecular biology & genomics-Mathiopoulos lab
The analysis of genes involved in the sexual behaviour of the olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae. Our purpose is the use of these data for the improvement of the SIT approaches or other innovative pest control strategies
Ewan CAMPBELL
Dr
School of Biological Sciences
University of Aberdeen
Aberdeen Aberdeen City United Kingdom
e.m.campbell@abdn.ac.uk
Bowman Lab
I am interested in applying RNAi and gene silencing techniques to the field of agricultural and livestock pests with a focus on the major parasite of Honey bees, the Varroa mite. I have developed RNAi targets and delivery mechanisms in a range of species including Sea Lice, Ticks and mites. I am also interested in utilising RNAi and gene manipulation for the study of physiological pathways in ectoparasites, such as in host sensing, reproductive cues and blood feeding.
Waring Trible
Genetics
Rockefeller University
New York NY USA
wtrible@rockefeller.edu
Kronauer Laboratory
Ant genetics. I am currently working on developing a CRISPR protocol in the ant Cerapachys biroi, which I will use to study genes relevant to caste differentiation and chemical communication. Past projects include population genetics of fire ants and army ants, fire ant phermone analysis, and phylogenetics of ant evolution.
William Bart Bryant
Research Assistant Professor
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan Ks usa
wbb@ksu.edu
Kristin Michel Lab
Currently my research in the Kristin Michel lab focuses on studying the interplay between fecundity and immunity in the malaria vector mosquito.
Nathaniel Grubbs
Postdoctoral Research Assistant
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh North Carolina United States
npgrubbs@ncsu.edu
Lorenzen Lab
My primary research focus is on the characterization of the naturally occurring, selfish genetic element, Medea, in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Medea operates by killing any offspring of a heterozygous mother that do not inherit at least one copy from either parent, but how the element causes this lethality, or prevents it, is still unknown. Understanding this function could give us valuable insight into selfish genetic elements, and perhaps even enable us to use Medea as a stable gene-drive in other species. I am also working with others in the lab to help develop molecular tools for studying the
RANIA ABD EL-WAHAB
Assistant Professor
CV
Mites of Cotton and Field Crops
PLANT PROTECTION RESEARCH INSTITUTE
MANSOURA MANSOURA EGYPT
rania-proline@hotmail.com

NANOTECHNOLOGY,LIGHT EMITTING DIODES EFFECTS,PREDATION ON MITES
Hasan Basibuyuk
Dr
Biology
Cumhuriyet University
Sivas Central Anatolia Turkey
hbbuyuk@cumhuriyet.edu.tr
CUMSAG
My main research areas include higher-level phylogeny, functional morphology, and systematics of Hymenoptera. I am interested in phylogeny and taxonomy of Turkish sawflies, in particularly stem borers (Cephidae), and also molecular systematics, evolution, phylogeny and phylogeography of Anatolian biodiversity. My ongoing research projects are on the evolution of mitochondrial genome in Hymenoptera (mostly sawflies) and utility of COI and ITS2 in barcoding of holo-and hemimetabolous insects.
sarah boyd
AWP
AWP
beacon NY United States
sarah.hoover.boyd@gmail.com
AWP
This is a sample entry.
Scott Geib
Research Entomologist
DKI-PBARC
USDA-ARS
Hilo Hawaii United States
scott.geib@ars.usda.gov

Genomics of Tephritid fruit flies. Whole genome sequencing, trait association, QTL, Linkage mapping, Functional Genomics, RNAi, CRISPR/CAS
Zain UlAbdin
Dr./Assistant Professor
Entomology
University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Faisalabad Punjab Pakistan
zainunibas@gmail.com
"Insect Molecular Biology Lab."
Insect parasitoids have evolved an amazing array of mechanisms to manipulate host physiology and biochemistry and they are able to suppress the immune response of the host and to disrupt its development and reproduction. The virulence and host regulation factors triggering these alterations are injected by the ovipositing females in their hosts. The astonishing richness of species in the parasitic Hymenoptera pro¬vides a unique reservoir of molecular biodiversity for new bio¬insecticide molecules, targeting a number of insect species and developmental stages. Host-parasitoid associations in insects offer an impressive opportunity to identify new genes and molecules responsible for the major
Bryony Bonning
Director, NSF I/UCRC
Department of Entomology
University of Florida
Gainesville Florida USA
bbonning@ufl.edu
Insect Management Technology
Molecular interactions between viruses and insects, and between microbe-derived insect toxins and their receptors. Fundamental knowledge of these interactions is then used to optimize current insect pest management strategies and to develop novel environmentally benign solutions.
Hua Bai
Investigator
CV
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Brown University
Providence RI USA
hua_bai@brown.edu

Neuroendocrine regulation of insect development, reproduction, metabolism and aging
Robert Brucker
Rowland Junior Fellow
FAS - Rowland Institute
Harvard University
Cambridge MA USA
bruckerlab@gmail.com
Brucker lab
Microbe-host-envoronment interactions and evolution.
Gary Blissard
Professor
Boyce Thompson Institute
Boyce Thompson Institute at Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
gwb1@cornell.edu
Blissard Lab
Our lab focuses on virus-insect interactions with a particular emphasis on baculoviruses and other viruses that interact with the midgut of insects. We are especially interested in polarized transport within midgut cells, and the cellular responses (at the transcriptome level) to viral infection.
varada abhyankar
MBRl, Department of Zoology
Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune
Pune Maharashtra India
varada.abhyankar@gmail.com
Molecular Biology Research laboratory
Epigenetic and molecular mechanisms involved in immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.
Nasiru Ibrahim
Prof
Crop Science
Usmanu Danfodiyo University,Sokoto,Nigeria
Sokoto Sokoto Nigeria
dolegoronyo@yahoo.com

My interest is looking at different plants for thier potential in controlling insect pest of field and stored produce
Patricia Jumbo Lucioni
Postdoctoral research scholar
Biological Sciences
Vanderbilt University
Nashville TN USA
patricia.jumbo@vanderbilt.edu
Postdoctoral Research Scholar-Broadie Lab
My current research field addresses the unknown mechanisms behind inborn errors of metabolism, classic galactosemia and congenital disorders of glycosylation. Patients with these disorders grow to develop neurodevelopmental complications of unknown mechanism which lack appropriate treatment. I use fruit flies as genetic models to characterize these phenotypes and elucidate disease mechanisms underlying these chronic inborn deficits.
Michelle Brown
Vice President & Chief Scientist
R & D
Olfactor Laboratories Inc
Riverside California United States
mbrown@olfactorlabs.com

Olfactor Laboratories, Inc. (OLI) is designing and developing innovative products that can be part of the world-wide strategy to significantly reduce diseases spread by insects and lower the general nuisance caused by their proximity to humans. Our initial research is focused on mosquitos as they are a major cause of the spread of many debilitating and potentially lethal diseases around the world. By using safe chemicals to disrupt the insect’s olfactory system (the primary mechanism used in locating a human or other animal to use as a source of a blood-meal), OLI’s efficient and cost-effective products will seek to protect humans
Julia Bristow
Biological Sciences
Syngeta
Bracknell Berkshire England
Julia.Bristow@syngenta.com

Molecular Biology and Genetics
Komal kumar Bollepogu Raja
student
Biochemistry and Molecular biology
Michigan Technological University
Houghton Michigan USA
kbollepo@mtu.edu

Studying complex color patterns in new model organisms
Peter Cherbas
Professor emeritus
Biology
Indiana University
Bloomington IN USA
cherbas@indiana.edu

Drosophila development. Ecdysone. Cell lines.
Jonathan Bobek
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe Arizona United States
jonathan.bobek@asu.edu
Gro Amdam Lab
I am interested in the genetic underpinnings of behavior and physiology in the honeybee, Apis Mellifera. Previously I have studied artificial flower color choice of free-flying honeybee foragers, examining relative expression through microarray. I am currently examining gene candidates which may be involved in the transition from nurse to forager roles.
Takuya Tsubota
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
Tsukuba Ibaraki Japan
tsubota@affrc.go.jp
Transgenic Silkworm Research Unit
My research is concerned with the development of silkworm transgenic technique and its application. I succeeded in identifying a novel silkworm strong and ubiquitous promoter, that is, hsp90 promoter. Using the novel techniques, I want to clarify lepidopteran-specific biological phenomena such as gene regulation in the silk gland.
Ifeoma Ezugbo-Nwobi
Parasitology and Entomology
Nnamdi Azikiwe University
Awka Anambra Nigeria
ifeomaezugbonwobi@yahoo.com
Parasitology and Entomology Research Lab
Focused on understanding vector-borne diseases like Malaria, Lymphatic filariasis, Onchocerciasis, Dengue, Yellow fever, etc, so that better control measures can be developed. I seek to integrate traditional parasitological and entomological procedures with molecular genetics and bioinformatics-based technologies to deliver new insights into vector biology and ecology.
Daniel Bopp
Dr
Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
University of Zurich
Zurich Zurich Switzerland
daniel.bopp@imls.uzh.ch
Evolution of sex determination pathways
We are studying the evolution of sex determining pathways by comparing the pathway in Drosophila melanogaster to those of the housefly Musca domestica and the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum. We find that the genes at the end of the Drosophila pathway, doublesex and its direct regulators, transformer and transformer2 are highly conserved and probably part of an ancient module that controls sexual differentiation in holometabolous insects . In contrast, genes upstream at the signaling end of the cascade have largely diverged between the different insect species. We are presently analysing the structure and function of such regulatory genes
Eran Tauber
Dr
Genetics
University of Leicester
Leicester Leicestershire United Kingdom
eran.tauber@gmail.com

proximate and ultimate (evolutionary) mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms and seasonal timing.
Vassiliki Bariami
Dr.
CV
Bioresources Project-Group
Justus Liebig University
Giessen Hessen Germany
vassiliki.bariami@ime.fraunhofer.de
Risk Assessment of Transgenics
In my early scientific pursuits my main focus has been the unveiling of genes and pathways implicated in insect and more specifically, mosquito insecticide resistance establishment. Having seen first hand that resistance development is rapidly undermining mosquito control efforts my research interest and focus have shifted towards the development of eco- friendly transgene based tools for mosquito management .
Jozef Vanden Broeck
Prof. Dr.
Animal Physiology and Neurobiology (Dept. of Biology)
University of Leuven
Leuven Flanders Belgium
Jozef.VandenBroeck@bio.kuleuven.be
Molecular Developmental Physiology and Signal Transduction
This research group is investigating the physiological role and mode of action of neural and endocrine messenger molecules in postembryonic developmental processes. These processes are studied in an evolutionary context by comparative approaches. In particular, we are studying receptors and their signal transduction pathways in insect cells. Our aim is to unravel the cellular and organismal physiological mechanisms that regulate important post-embryonic developmental processes, such as growth and reproduction. The group is also interested in the influence of environmental factors that can lead to the extreme phenotypic plasticity of locust species. In addition, application-oriented research is carried out to explore novel
Kristen Brochu
Entomology
Cornell University
Ithaca NY USA
kb532@cornell.edu

I study the digestive adaptations involved in specialist vs. generalist bee diet preferences.
Mark Blaxter
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Scotland UK
mark.blaxter@ed.ac.uk
Nematode and neglected genomics
The Blaxter nematode and neglected genomics lab uses genomics approaches, based on next-gen sequencing, to assemble, annotate and interpret the genomes of target species. While our main focus is on parasitic members of the Nematoda (we are involved in projects to understand the evolutionary genomic origins of parasitism, and collaborate with a wide range of biologists developing new drugs and vaccines for human and animal diseases), we also study free-living nematodes, nematomorphs, tardigrades, onychophorans, obscure and not so obscure arthropods... and some token lophotrochozoans, such as snails and earthworms. A second research focus in on bacterial symbionts of animals, particularly
Roger Huybrechts
Prof.Dr.
Department of Biology
KU Leuven
Leuven Flanders  Belgium
Roger.huybrechts@bio.kuleuven.be
Insect physiology and Molecular Ethology
In context of two ongoing PhD researches we presently focus our research towards two main topics 1) cellular innate immunity in the locust including trials to obtain primary and stable locust cell lines 2) understanding the regulation of anautogenicity in the fleshfly Sarcophaga crassipapis
Philip Batterham
Professor
Genetics Dept/Bio21 Institute
University of Melbourne
Parkville Victoria Australia
p.batterham@unimelb.edu.au
Systems biology of the insect:insecticide interface
There are three areas of research in my lab:- 1. The biology of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors that are targeted by insecticides including neonicotinoids and spinosyns. 2. The systems biology of neonicotinoid metabolism and transport combining genetic and metabolomic approaches. 3. Pest insect genomics. Specifically we work on the flesh fly, Lucilia cuprina, and the moth, Helicoverpa armigera. Much of our research is conducted in the model insect Drosophila melanogaster, however we do bioassay the function of pest genes expressed in this species.
Martin Beye
Professor
Institute of Evolutionary Genetics
Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Duesseldorf NRW Germany
martin.beye@hhu.de
Honeybee genetics, evolutionary genetics
We would like to understand the genetic basis of sex determination and social behaviors in honeybees. We have developed a method to generate high frequency integrations of the piggyBac Transposon in the honeybee
Hongmei Li-Byarlay
NRC Research Fellow
CV
Entomology
North Carolina State University
Raleigh NC United States
hlibyar@ncsu.edu

I'm working on insect genomics, stress, and social behavior. My research interests include how genetic or epigenetic marks regulate gene activities in natural conditions as well as different stress conditions, or how they affects social behaviors of insects.
John Belote
Professor
Biology Department
Syracuse University
Syracuse NY USA
jbelote@syr.edu
Belote Lab
In collaboration with the Scott Pitnick lab (Syracuse University) we are studying mechanisms of post-mating sexual selection in a variety of insects, including Drosophila, Tribolium, sepsids and yellow dung flies.
John Rebers
Department Head
CV
Biology
Northern Michigan University
Marquette MI USA
jrebers@nmu.edu

Structure of arthropod cuticular proteins, particularly as related to chitin binding.
Markus Brown
Entomology
University of Maryland
Beltsville MD USA
markus.a.brown@hotmail.com

Cells experience a variety of stresses in their environment, whether from friend, foe, or terrain, and must adapt to their changing environment to maintain their survival. This occurs in two ways, evolution and epigentic modifications. Evolution is the much slower process by which the cell permanently alters the enzymes in its arsenal, whilst epigenetics are a quick, temporary change in pace caused by fleeting stresses in the environment. I hope to elucidate the mechanisms by which fungi use epigenetics to quickly mediate and monitor their gene expression profiles in response to alterations in their environment.
Anna-Maria Botha
Professor PhD
Genetics
Stellenbosch University
Stellenbosch Western Cape South Africa
ambo@sun.ac.za
Cereal Genomics
The Genomics research group at Stellenbosch, headed by Prof. Anna-Maria Botha-Oberholster aims to be at the forefront of research on wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) resistance to Diuraphis noxia (Kurdj., Hemiptera, Aphididae), although other important plant stressors are also under investigation. Our research is hypothesis driven and fundamental in nature, but aims to address current problems relevant to the agricultural community. Research focus Russian wheat aphid resistance Research in the Cereal Genome programme focuses on the elucidation of the underlying genetic mechanisms involved in host-pest interactions by making use of genomic tools. Understanding defence mechanisms in the wheat host and how
Guy Bloch
Prof.
Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Jerusalem - None - Israel
guy.bloch@mail.huji.ac.il
Molecular Sociobiolgy
The main research interests of our group are the evolution and mechanisms underlying sociality and social behavior, we study bees as a model. To study these fascinating and intricate phenomena we integrate analyses at different levels, from molecular to social. In recent years, one of our main research focuses has been the interplay between circadian rhythms and social behavior ("sociochronobiology").
Laura Boykin
Dr.
ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology and School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
The University of Western Australia
Crawley Western Australia Australia
laura.boykin@uwa.edu.au

I am interested in invasive species (Influenza, Hepatitis C, Carribbean Fruit fly, Whitefly, Asian citrus psyllid, Gypsy moth, Aphid parasitoid, and the Oriental Fruit Fly). My expertise in genomics, phylogentic theory and utilisation of supercomputers has made a substantial contribuion to understanding the evolutionary history of the invasive species. My most influential work has come from contributions (12 publications) to understanding the evolutionary relationships of the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci), the vector of the devastating Cassava Mosaic Viruses.
Leigh Boardman
Dr
Entomology & Nematology
University of Florida
Gainesville Fl USA
lboardman@ufl.edu

Integrative and comparative biology, genotype-phenotype interactions and the molecular mechanisms underlying organismal tolerance to environmental stressors
N Wybouw
Entomology
Gent University
Gent Oost-Vlaanderen Belgie
nicky_wybouw@hotmail.com

xenobiotic metabolism of phytophagous arthropods
Cynthia Staber
Sr. Laboratory Manager
Zeitlinger Lab
Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Kansas City MO USA
cst@stowers.org
Zeitlinger Lab
I have worked on Segregation Distorter for many years and now work on regulation of developmental timing in the Drosophila embryo.
Simon Bullock
Dr
Cell Biology
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology
Cambridge Cambridgeshire UK
sbullock@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk
Mechanisms of cytoplasmic mRNA transport
Our group is interested in how mRNAs and other cargoes are sorted within the cytoplasm by microtubule-based motors. We exploit the genetics of Drosophila melanogaster for part of our work, and have optimised CRISPR/Cas tools for this organism (www.crisprflydesign.org).
Darren Obbard
Dr
Institute of Evolutionary Biology
University of Edinburgh
Edinburgh Midlothian UK
darren.obbard@ed.ac.uk

Evolutionary Genetics Genome Evolution Drosophila Insect viruses Antiviral RNAi
Gregor Bucher
Professor
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
Georg-August-University Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
gbucher1@uni-goettingen.de
Evolutionary Developmental Genetics
I am interested in the developmental genetics of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum with a focus on the evolution of development. The current topics of the lab are: 1. Large scale RNAi screen "iBeetle" 2. Genetics of insect head development 3. Evolution of neural stem cells of the central complex 4. Pattern formation during meetamorphosis. 5. Development of transgenic tools (misexpression, in vivo imaging, etc).
Thierry Brévault
Dr
Entomology
CIRAD
Dakar Dakar Senegal
brevault@cirad.fr

Entomology and Ecology
Omar Akbari
Postdoctoral Scholar
Biological Engineering
Caltech
Pasadena CA USA
oakbari@caltech.edu
Bruce Hay Lab
My research focuses on developing innovative population replacement methods for manipulating the composition and/or fate of the wild mosquito vector populations in ways that are catalytic: by introducing relatively small numbers of individuals into natural populations, resulting in effects that increase over time and in space, and that are self-sustaining. These approaches utilize synthetically engineered selfish genetic elements designed to rapidly spread themselves with linked cargo genes into wild populations.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Peter Armbruster
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC USA
paa9@georgetown.edu
Armbruster
Research in my lab is focused on understanding processes of phenotypic evolution in natural populations and the molecular bases of adaptation. Our approach to these questions is integrative. We perform a wide range of studies, including field ecology, quantitative and population genetics, and molecular physiology. We are currently studying the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus, a vector of both dengue fever and Chikungunya virus. Our research intersects with a variety of topics in both invasive species biology and medical entomology, and we are particularly interested in novel approaches that lie at the interface of these
Carolyn McBride
Assistant Professor
Neuroscience and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Princeton University
Princeton NJ USA
lmcbride@rockefeller.edu

The molecular, neural, and evolutionary basis of insect behavior
Leonard Rabinow
professor
Biology
Univ. Paris Sud
Orsay none France
leonard.rabinow@u-psud.fr

Regulation of sex determination, apoptosis, and signal transduction via phosphorylation by LAMMER protein kinases
Mohammad Mehrabadi
Department of Entomology
TMU
Tehran Tehran Iran
mehrabadi86@gmail.com

Small regulatory RNAs (microRNAs, piRNAs) and their roles in insect biology and host-pathogen interactions RNA-based antiviral immunity & viral suppressor of RNAi (VSR) Evolution of host-pathogen/microbe interactions Patho-bitechnology (genetic engineering of insect pathogens to enhance virulence and efficiency) Molecular biology of insect viruses and their application in agriculture and medicine
Gene Robinson
Swanlund Chair of Entomology
Department of Entomology and Institute for Genomic Biology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Urbana IL USA
generobi@illinois.edu
Robinson Lab
Robinson uses genomics and systems biology to study the mechanisms and evolution of social life. His principal model system is the Western honey bee, Apis mellifera, along with other species of bees. The goal is to explain the function and evolution of behavioral mechanisms that integrate the activity of individuals in a society, neural and neuroendocrine mechanisms that regulate behavior within the brain of the individual, and the genes that influence social behavior. Research focuses on division of labor, aggression, and the famous dance language, a system of symbolic communication. Current projects include: 1) nutritional regulation of brain gene expression
Kevin Nyberg
Biology
University of Maryland, College Park
College Park MD USA
kevingnyberg@gmail.com

I am currently researching the expression and evolution of long noncoding RNAs in the genus Drosophila.
Susanta Behura
Department of Biological Sciences
University of Notre Dame
Notre Dame Indiana USA
sbehura@nd.edu

My work focuses on insect genetics and genomics. My primary interests are on functional and evolutionary genomics of vector competence of Aedes aegypti to dengue virus infection. Other specific areas of interest are 1) Comparative genomics, 2) Transcriptomics 3) Codon bias and translational selection, 4) Mitochondria and Numt, 5) Transposable elements and repeat sequences, 6) Non-coding RNAs, 7) Genome sequencing and analysis, and genome-wide association studies.
Yehuda Ben-Shahar
Assistant Professor
Biology
Washington University in St. Louis
St. Louis Missouri USA
benshahary@wustl.edu
Ben-Shahar lab at Wash U
We are interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral plasticity on three major time scales: evolutionary, Developmental and Physiological. We address these questions with the powerful genetic model Drosophila melanogaster (the fruit fly), and the emerging model for complex social behaviors, the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. Research approaches in the lab include behavior, genetics, genomics, molecular and cellular biology, and neurophysiology.
Björn Brembs
Prof. Dr.
Institute of Zoology - Neurogenetics
Universität Regensburg
Regensburg Bavaria Germany
bjoern@brembs.net

We are interested in the neurobiology of spontaneous behavioral choice and operant learning.
Kent Shelby
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Insects Research Laboratory
Agricultural Research Service
Columbia MO USA
shelbyk@missouri.edu

Immunobiology, nutrition, toxicogenomics, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, RNAi
Stefan Baumgartner
Professor
Dept. of Experimental Medical Sciences
Lund University
Lund SE Sweden
Stefan.Baumgartner@med.lu.se
Baumgartner Lab
We are mainly interested in the mechanisms involved in early patterning of the insect embryo and work mostly on the bicoid gene in Drosophila. There, we analyze the mechanisms that lead to the formation of the bicoid mRNA gradient which ultimately dictates the Bicoid protein gradient. Lately, we also developed an interest in patterning events in Lucilia sericata and Bactrocera dorsalis. There, we work on the orthodenticle, Kruppel and the even-skipped genes.
LJ Zwiebel
Cornelius Vanderbilt Professor of Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Biological Sciences/Pharmacology
Vanderbilt University/Medical Center
Nashville TN USA
l.zwiebel@vanderbilt.edu
LJZlab
We are examining the molecular events of olfaction as this sensory modality predominates most of the relevant behaviors in ants as well as host preference and several other behaviors in mosquitoes to thereby make significant impact to vectorial capacity. Working together with several outstanding collaborators here at Vanderbilt and around the world, we are interested in understanding the mechanisms by which insects transduce chemical signals from their environment into neuronal activity and ultimately behavior. Within Anopheles, we focus specifically on the genetic basis for anthropophily- the characteristic preference for human biting that significantly drives malaria transmission by An. gambiae.
Dr. Noble Sinnathamby
Professor in Zoology
faculty
CV
Department of Zoology
University of Jaffna
Jaffna Northern Sri Lanka
noble@jfn.ac.lk
Vector Biology Lab
Major research areas are (i) study the biology of insect disease vectors such as mosquitoes and sand flies (ii) develop molecular techniques to identify sibling species of the Anopheline species complexes in Sri Lanka, (iii) investigate insecticide resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes and sand flies and (iv) population genetics of insect vectors . Currently working with IBBR/University of Maryland-College Park to study the functional genomics using transgenic approach.
Dr. Susan Brown
Distinguished Professor
faculty
Division of Biology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS United States
sjbrown@ksu.edu
Brown Lab
The Brown lab is using the Irys high-throughput genome mapping platform from BioNano Genomics to improve the Tribolium castaneum genome.
Dr. Jennifer Brisson
Assistant Professor
faculty
Department of Biology
University of Rochester
Rochester NY United States
jbrisso3@bio.rochester.edu
Brisson Lab
genetic mapping and association mapping using Illumina data, as well as Illumina (RNA-Seq) studies; in situ hybridization of RNA to embryos, methyl-Seq
David O’Brochta
Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology; Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland
dobrocht@umd.edu
Rockville MD United States
dobrocht@umd.edu
O'Brochta Lab
Our research focuses on insect molecular genetics with particular interest in the study of insects that transmit human diseases although our interests are very broad. Our interests in genetics center around the study of transposable elements.  Those interests range from questions concerning their basic biology and aspects of their movement to more applied question concerning their development and use as genome manipulation tools.  Our insect interests are centered mainly on mosquitoes and the physiological genetics of Plasmodium infection.