Participants

Participation in the Insect Genetic Technologies Research Coordination Network is open to students (undergraduate and graduate), postdoctoral researchers, technical and scientific staff and independent investigators with an interest in insect science, genomics, and genetic technologies. Knowledge of and/or expertise with insect genetic technologies is not required to participate in this network. In fact, those without specific knowledge of insect genetic technologies are especially encouraged to participate so that a broader understanding and application of these technologies can be developed.

As a participant, you will be able to fully interact and access the resources on this site. You will be able to find experts interested in technologies or insect systems you are interested in, find consultants or collaborators and submit content to this site in the form of ‘posts’ to Technology Topics, Knowledgebase, Network Announcements, and Activities.


 

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Participant Contact Research Focus
Peter Atkinson
Professor
Entomology/Institute for Integrative Genome Biology
University of California Riverside
Riverside CA USA
peter.atkinson@ucr.edu
Atkinson Lab
I am interested in how transposable elements work both in vitro and in their host organisms. I am interested in how transposable elements can be harnessed as gene vectors in insects and also how they can be utilized in genetic control strategies.
Dr. Zach N. Adelman Dr. Zach N. Adelman
Associate Professor
faculty
Department of Entomology
Texas A&M University
College Station TX United States
zachadel@tamu.edu
Adelman Lab
Research in my laboratory is concerned with understanding the molecular and genetic interactions between arboviruses and their mosquito hosts. Research projects are based in the molecular virology of arboviruses (dengue viruses, Sindbis) as well as the molecular biology and genetic manipulation of the vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti.
Dr. Gro Amdam
Professor
faculty
School of Life Sciences
Arizona State University
Tempe AZ USA
gro.amdam@asu.edu
Amdam Lab
Our lab experimentally investigates honey bee social structure to understand how communal living evolved from ancestral solitary forms of life. As we have come to a better understanding of the physiology and genetics of bees, we have expanded our research interests: the honey bee (Apis mellifera) makes an ideal model organism for understanding the regulation of social life-history, aging and epigenetics.
Dr. Serap Aksoy
Professor
researcher
School of Public Health
Yale
New Haven Connecticut USA
serap.aksoy@yale.edu
Aksoy Lab
Our lab studies multiple aspects of tsetse flies, the vectors of African trypanosomes. Trypanosomes are the causative agents of the devastating Sleeping Sickness disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. The lab’s work spans a range of projects including tsetse immunity, reproduction and symbiosis, tsetse-symbiont and trypanosome interactions, tsetse genomics and population genetics, and trypanosome developmental processes in tsetse. The ultimate goal of our work is to improve current control methods and/or develop novel strategies to reduce or eliminate the transmission of Sleeping Sickness in Sub-Saharan Africa.
varada abhyankar
MBRl, Department of Zoology
Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune
Pune Maharashtra India
varada.abhyankar@gmail.com
Molecular Biology Research laboratory
Epigenetic and molecular mechanisms involved in immune response of Drosophila melanogaster.
Badrul Arefin
Molecular Biosciences
Stockholm University
Stockholm   Sweden
badrul.arefin@su.se
Ulrich Theopold
I am interested in to understand the molecular and the cellular mechanisms involved in the response against nematode infections in Drosophila melanogaster. Currently, I am working on insect immunity, particularly Drosophila immunity towards entomopathogenic nematodes (EPN). Until now, our knowledge on Drosophila immunity mostly comes from studies of bacterial and fungal infections. However, nematode parasites are considered one the biggest threats to human health, causing diseases leading to death. Even when they are not killing, they could stay in the host and cause chronic diseases. Lymphatic filariasis is such an example which is caused by Wuchereria bancrofti (filarial nematode).
Kallare Arunkumar
Scientist
CV
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics
Hyderabad Telangana India
arun@cdfd.org.in
Laboratory of Molecular Genetics
During the last one decade, research in the silkworm, Bombyx mori has witnessed explosive developments which include unveiling of complete genome sequence; availability of large amount of transcirptomics resources through ESTs, microarray and RNAseq; high density linkage and physical maps; map-based cloning; well-established piggyBac mediated transgenics; TALENs based gene disruption systems; and identification of critical genes for proliferation of baculovirus. The concomitant advancements in other insects such as Drosophila, Honeybee, Mosquito, and Tribolium, particularly in understanding sex-determination mechanisms, microRNA functions, molecular mechanisms of immune response pathways and RNAi-based analysis of gene functions, provide impetus to build silkworm as a basic
Hassan M. Ahmed
Developmental Biology
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen
Göttingen Niedersachsen Germany
hmutasi@biologie.uni-goettingen.de
Wimmer Lab
My research focus in the use of developmental and molecular biology techniques to develop eco-friendly transgenic insect control strategies that can be used to fight insect of economical and public health importance (agricultural pest, diseases vectors).
Ramasamy Asokan
Principal Scientist (Agricultural Entomology)
CV
Biotechnology
Indian Institute of Horticultural Research (IIHR)
Bangalore  Karnataka INDIA
asokaniihr@gmail.com
Insect Molecular Biology
RNAi in the management of 1. Sap sucking insects viz. Thrips, whiteflies, aphids, leaf hoppers, mirids 2. Lepidoptera (Helicoverpa armigera, Spodoptera litura, Plutella xylostella) 3. Discovery and utilization of small RNAs especially microRNAs from insect pests
Dr. Md Saheb Ali
Senior Researcher (Senior Scientific Officer)
CV
Agriculture Wing/Faculty
Bangladesh Jute Research Institute
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan and Utsunomiya University, Japan
Utsunomiya & TUAT, TOKYO JAPAN
sahebbjri@yahoo.com
Lab of Insect Molecular Biology/ Lab of Insect Biotechnology
My research interest focused to clarify the regulatory mechanism of cuticular protein gene expression of insect using reverse-transcriptase PCR, real-time PCR, cloning, plasmid construction, histology, site-directed mutagenesis, gene-gun and reporter construct preparation, transient expression analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay.
Nesreen Abd El-Ghany
Dr.
Pests and Plant Protection
National Research Center
Cairo Giza Egypt
nesreennrc@gmail.com

My research focus on Insect Microbial Control; specially control of lepidopterous insect pests using Bt and other biological control agents as nematode and fungi. Moreover, I have experience in plant transformation as a new approach for insect control "Bt-Crops". I'm interested in insect molecular biology and transformation system. I'm interested in how transposable elements can be used in genetic control strategies.
Omar Akbari
Postdoctoral Scholar
Biological Engineering
Caltech
Pasadena CA USA
oakbari@caltech.edu
Bruce Hay Lab
My research focuses on developing innovative population replacement methods for manipulating the composition and/or fate of the wild mosquito vector populations in ways that are catalytic: by introducing relatively small numbers of individuals into natural populations, resulting in effects that increase over time and in space, and that are self-sustaining. These approaches utilize synthetically engineered selfish genetic elements designed to rapidly spread themselves with linked cargo genes into wild populations.
Peter Armbruster
Associate Professor
CV
Department of Biology
Georgetown University
Washington DC USA
paa9@georgetown.edu
Armbruster
Research in my lab is focused on understanding processes of phenotypic evolution in natural populations and the molecular bases of adaptation. Our approach to these questions is integrative. We perform a wide range of studies, including field ecology, quantitative and population genetics, and molecular physiology. We are currently studying the invasive and medically important mosquito Aedes albopictus, a vector of both dengue fever and Chikungunya virus. Our research intersects with a variety of topics in both invasive species biology and medical entomology, and we are particularly interested in novel approaches that lie at the interface of these
Karen Barandoc-Alviar
Research Associate
Plant Pathology
Kansas State University
Manhattan KS USA
kbalviar@ksu.edu
Plant-virus-vector interactions lab
My research focuses on virus-vector interaction and we use the emerging model system, Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper and Maize mosaic rhabdovirus (MMV). Our goal is to identify vector molecules that respond to virus infection and how changes in vector physiology and behavior affect efficiency of transmission to host plants.
Channa Aluvihare
Research Technician
technician
Insect Transformation Facility
Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research
University of Maryland College Park at Shady Grove
Rockville MD USA
aluvihar@umd.edu
Insect Transformation Facility
Insect rearing for genetic modification, genetically modified organisms and gene delivery systems.
Adenike Adeyemo
Dr Mrs
Department of Biology, School of Sciences
Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria
Akure,  Ondo State Nigeria
yemonike@yahoo.com
Food Storage Laboratory, Department of Biology
Stored products Entomology, Insect biochemistry with emphasis on mode of action of bio -pesticides in insects
Flor Acevedo
Graduate student
Entomology
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park PA United States
floredith.acevedo@gmail.com

Functional genomics, insect transformation, plant defense response to biotic stresses, chemical ecology,
Michalis Averof
IGFL
CNRS
Lyon Rhone France
michalis.averof@ens-lyon.fr

Comparative developmental biology and regeneration
Muhammad Akmal
Insect genetic diversity and infection with endosymbionts
CV
Entomology
Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan
Multan Punjab Pakistan
akmal07bzu@gmail.com
lab. of Insect Microbiology and Molecular Biology,
I am working on genetics of Amrasca biguttula and its infection with wolbachia.
Margaret Allen
Research Entomologist
Biological Control of Pests Research Unit
US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service
Stoneville MS USA
megallenathome@gmail.com
Functional Genetics
Functional genetics of a variety of insects that are non-model organisms.